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How to view an 8gb .mkv file on a mac

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February 19, 2010 4:17:37 PM

Hi, i've just got a film in high definition on my pc and i want to give it to a friend of mine who has a mac but i cant give her the file because the bloody mac hard drive format doesn't allow single files over 4.5 gb. surely there must be a workaround for this? if not it is a serious problem that apple really really should have foreseen!

Thanks for any help on this

More about : view 8gb mkv file mac

February 19, 2010 5:38:55 PM

Someone's been pulling your leg. The maximum file size on an HFS partition is (depending upon the version of OS X) somewhere between 2TB and 8 EB - providing you can find a big enough disk.

Obviously a problem that Apple did foresee.
February 21, 2010 4:53:35 PM

Hi, ok fair enough that they foresaw it but how can i transfer an 8gb file from a pc to a mac? is there a type of hard drive formatting that i dont know about that works for both mac and pc that allows large files? i thought the only one that was compatible for both was FAT32?

Cheers
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February 21, 2010 6:53:46 PM

The easiest way would be to transfer the files over a network. If that's not possible, you can use MacFuse to allow OS X to read NTFS formatted disks.

Note that the limitation that you ascribe to Apple is actually a limitation of a Microsoft file system.
February 22, 2010 8:04:31 AM

I think i'm going to go with the network idea then if you think its easiest and because i've sorted a basic home network out here. but how do i get a drive thats shared on a pc to appear on the mac's desktop?

Thanks again
February 22, 2010 8:59:08 AM

Here's a link that explains how to do this. The network connection is by far the easiset way to transfer files.
February 22, 2010 9:08:54 AM

heh - you could use 7zip or something to make the mkv file into a series of .rar files, chop the file up into smaller pieces, copy them across on a FAT32 USB stick, then use some software to un-rar them on the Mac.

I dont use a Mac, so Im not sure what good archiving software you can run on one, but this method to me sounds easiest :) 
February 22, 2010 9:14:08 AM

RickyT23 said:
heh - you could use 7zip or something to make the mkv file into a series of .rar files, chop the file up into smaller pieces, copy them across on a FAT32 USB stick, then use some software to un-rar them on the Mac.

I dont use a Mac, so Im not sure what good archiving software you can run on one, but this method to me sounds easiest :) 

Sounds rather more complicated than a simple network transfer to me!
February 22, 2010 10:14:40 AM

Ijack said:
Sounds rather more complicated than a simple network transfer to me!


As apposed to setting up a “network” just to copy one file? Sorry but I just had to say ;o)
February 22, 2010 10:45:58 AM

lloydie_p said:
As apposed to setting up a “network” just to copy one file? Sorry but I just had to say ;o)

The OP has already stated that he has a home network. Doesn't everyone nowadays?
February 23, 2010 9:18:01 AM

Quite a few people have home networks that is true, but as a person who in the past has gotten Macs to speak to Windows (NT, 2003 servers) and visa versa; it’s not necessarily an easy thing to do.

Thus you telling "RickyT23" that it “Sounds rather more complicated than a simple network transfer to me!” seemed a bit too much of a network centric response.

Your solution is probably the best if “DJ-Specter” will be doing further transfers; but I’m pretty certain that splitting and re combining one mkv file as suggested would be the faster and simpler method or at worst require the same amount of effort.

The file split option is also useful when sending larger files (I’m not suggesting an 8gb mkv) via email.

Forgive my diatribe but basically what I’m saying is that there is always more than one way to skin a cat!!
February 23, 2010 9:34:36 AM

Whatever. I find it trivial to get my Mac talking to my PCs over the network. YMMV.
February 23, 2010 10:27:45 AM

why split the file? 16GB memory sticks aren't uncommon.
February 26, 2010 3:59:40 AM

mi1ez said:
why split the file? 16GB memory sticks aren't uncommon.

Because if the memory stick is (like most memory sticks) formatted as FAT32, the maximum file size is 4GB. Of course, if you just format the memory stick as NTFS, the transfer will work fine (and I'm pretty sure OSX can read NTFS formatted volumes).
February 26, 2010 6:03:44 AM

Current versions of OS X can certainly read NTFS. But it's a one-way process. I suspect that most people would like to transfer files both ways. You can't beat Samba, FTP, or some other network protocol for this as it makes the underlying file system transparent.

We're living in the 21st century, so let's make use of networks rather than floppy disks or their latter-day equivalent.
March 21, 2010 4:34:33 AM

A real easy option is to use an ftp client. If it is not sensitive material get a free ftp account from some place. I sync my files all the time that way. So i agree ijack.
June 1, 2010 8:49:44 AM

why not transfer the file on DVD disc? you can burn mkv video file to DVD on your PC, and then send here the DVD, then she can watch it on her Mac or DVD player. :D 
!