Back up/Copy

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Oh I love this site, its so helpfull!!!
I hope this doesn't sound too silly to all u very smart XP users,
but....
I have been using XP since last August, and I think Im doing okay, now,
Im wondering what kind of back ups I should be doing, I thought I should
have a disc of documents etc and also a disc of system programmes etc
and what is a bootable disc, how do i get one?
Should I be copying to disc incase of something going wrong with comp?

Any help of basic security measures would be gratefully received, in
quite easy to flollow instructions would be even better.
Many Thanks
Lel


--
lel
3 answers Last reply
More about back copy
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    In news:lel.1mm71r@pcbanter.net,
    lel <lel.1mm71r@pcbanter.net> typed:

    > Oh I love this site, its so helpfull!!!


    First of all, note that this is *not* a web site, this is the
    Microsoft newsgroup microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers.

    You are, however, apparently accessing the group through a web
    site, and that's the slowest, clunkiest, most error-prone method
    there is. Do yourself a favor and switch to a newsreader, such as
    Outlook Express, which comes with Windows.
    See http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/outlookexpressnewreader.htm


    > I hope this doesn't sound too silly to all u very smart XP
    > users,
    > but....
    > I have been using XP since last August, and I think Im doing
    > okay,
    > now, Im wondering what kind of back ups I should be doing, I
    > thought
    > I should have a disc of documents etc and also a disc of system
    > programmes etc and what is a bootable disc, how do i get one?
    > Should I be copying to disc incase of something going wrong
    > with comp?


    Yes, if you have files which are valuable to do, you shuld be
    backing up regularly. It is always possible that a hard drive
    crash, user error, nearby lightning strike, virus attack, even
    theft of the computer, can cause the loss of everything on your
    drive. As has often been said, it's not a matter of whether you
    will have such a problem, but when.


    Essentially you should back up what you can't afford to
    lose--what you can't readily recreate. What that is depends on
    how you use your computer and what you use it for.


    It takes time and effort to backup, but it also takes time and
    effort to recreate lost data. If you back up daily, you should
    never have to recreate more than one day's worth of last data. If
    weekly, there's potentially a lot more to recreate. You should
    assess how much pain and trouble you would have if you lost x
    days of data, and then choose a backup frequency that doesn't
    involve more pain and trouble than that you would have if you had
    to recreate what was lost.


    At one extreme is the professional user who would likely go out
    of business if his data was lost. He probably needs to back up at
    least daily. At the other extreme is the kid who doesn't use his
    game except to play games. He probably needs no backup at all,
    since worst case he can easily reinstall his games.


    Most of us fall somewhere between those extremes, but nobody can
    tell you where you fall; you need to determine that for yourself.


    Should you back up Windows? Should you back up your applications?
    Most people will tell you no, since you can always reinstall
    these easily from the original media. But I don't think the
    answer is so clear-cut. Many people have substantial time and
    effort invested in customizing Windows and configuring their apps
    to work the way they want to. Putting all of that back the way it
    was can be a difficult, time-consuming effort. Whether you should
    backup up Windows and apps depends, once again, on you.


    How to backup? What software to use? There are many choices,
    including the Windows-supplied backup program. Which choice is
    best for you depends at least in part on the answers to some of
    the questions above.


    Finally what backup media should you choose, and how should it be
    stored? There are many choices, including CDs, tape, zip drives,
    and second hard drives.


    I don't recommend backup to a second non-removable hard drive
    because it leaves you susceptible to simultaneous loss of the
    original and backup to many of the most common dangers: severe
    power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, virus attacks, even
    theft of the computer.


    In my view, secure backup needs to be on removable media, and not
    kept in the computer. For really secure backup (needed, for
    example, if the life of your business depends on your data) you
    should have multiple generations of backup, and at least one of
    those generations should be stored off-site.


    My computer isn't used for business, but my personal backup
    scheme uses two identical removable hard drives, which fit into a
    sleeve installed in the computer. I alternate between the two,
    and use Drive Image to make a complete copy of the primary drive.


    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Which edition of XP are you using, Pro or Home? XP includes a Backup
    program, although it is not installed in Home (the installer is in the
    ValueAdd folder on the Home cd). It is under the Accessories/System Tools
    folder in Pro. It cannot use cd's or dvd's, however.

    The safest backup strategy is to backup to an external hard drive or to dvd
    discs. The reason is that if you backup to a partition on the C: drive you
    lose the backup if you lose the system drive. I also don't feel quite safe
    backing up to a second internal drive because a disaster to the computer
    could knock out all the drives. The advantage to an external drive or dvd's
    is that you can remove the backup media and store separately from the
    computer, if you wish.

    You can Google on several of the popular back up programs, such as
    Retrospect (Dantz), BackUpMyPC (Stomp), Acronis True Image, and any others
    that will shortly mentioned by other posters.

    --
    Colin Barnhorst [MVP Windows - Virtual Machine]
    (Reply to the group only unless otherwise requested)
    "lel" <lel.1mm71r@pcbanter.net> wrote in message
    news:lel.1mm71r@pcbanter.net...
    >
    > Oh I love this site, its so helpfull!!!
    > I hope this doesn't sound too silly to all u very smart XP users,
    > but....
    > I have been using XP since last August, and I think Im doing okay, now,
    > Im wondering what kind of back ups I should be doing, I thought I should
    > have a disc of documents etc and also a disc of system programmes etc
    > and what is a bootable disc, how do i get one?
    > Should I be copying to disc incase of something going wrong with comp?
    >
    > Any help of basic security measures would be gratefully received, in
    > quite easy to flollow instructions would be even better.
    > Many Thanks
    > Lel
    >
    >
    > --
    > lel
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Colin Barnhorst wrote:
    > It cannot use cd's or dvd's, however.
    >

    Yes it can. What it CAN'T do is to SPAN CDs or DVDs.
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