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March 29, 2005 2:23:09 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

I'm migrating over here from win98.gen_discussion. They are a
wonderful group of MVPs, but they have officially given me my walking
papers.

:) 

My old computer died and the new one is here - still in the box,
though. So, here I am - taking the plunge into XP newusers.

I have a few questions:

1. My new xp has Media Edition OEM. I read that media edition a
version of XP Pro. Is that true? If so, I won't need to install XP
Pro. If not, what are the vital differences between the two?

2. My new HD is 80 GIGs. Should I partition it? I was thinking one
partition could be media related and the other Office related because
my work will install Office Pro for me.

3. How large is the MS Office Pro program? Since I won't have an
installation disk on hand, I am wondering if I should have it installed
into its own file so that if I want to use a feature that isn't
installed, I can point my computer to it (that sort of tech support
takes practically forever in terms of weeks). Or should I have it
fully installed with all the bells and whistles, even though I may not
have any reason to use them?

4. Is there a compelling reason to convert my HD to Dynamic Disk, if
it's not already dynamic?

TIA
sf

More about : question

Anonymous
March 29, 2005 3:43:29 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Responses inline below:

--
In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.

Michael Solomon MS-MVP
Windows Shell/User
https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/


"sf" <sfpipeline@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1112120589.243389.131630@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> I'm migrating over here from win98.gen_discussion. They are a
> wonderful group of MVPs, but they have officially given me my walking
> papers.
>
> :) 
>
> My old computer died and the new one is here - still in the box,
> though. So, here I am - taking the plunge into XP newusers.
>
> I have a few questions:
>
> 1. My new xp has Media Edition OEM. I read that media edition a
> version of XP Pro. Is that true? If so, I won't need to install XP
> Pro. If not, what are the vital differences between the two?

XP Media Center Edition is s superset of XP Pro or, more accurately, a
modified edition of XP Pro. There are some minor differences mostly in the
area of networking. XP Media Center cannot join a domain. NOTE: XP Pro
install or upgrade to Pro even if you wanted to. You would have to first
wipe the drive and start over, something you can do from XP setup but you'd
have to boot from the XP Pro CD to properly begin the process. Nonetheless,
as I pointed out, for the most part, the two are the same.
>
> 2. My new HD is 80 GIGs. Should I partition it? I was thinking one
> partition could be media related and the other Office related because
> my work will install Office Pro for me.

Partitioning is strictly a personal preference and there is no better or
best way as it depends largely on your needs. That said, it is not
advisable to have separate partitions for applications. If you need to
reinstall the operating system from scratch, any applications installed on a
separate partition will need to be reinstalled. There's no benefit as far
as overall system operation and since you'd have to reinstall all apps in a
the above scenario anyway, you mght as well keep all applications installed
on the system drive. Personally, I try to keep my data files on a separate
drive from the system drive. If the system partition should go down and you
need to format and start over, you still have all your data on a separate
partition and I see nothing wrong, from an organizational standpoint in
having your data on one partition and your media files on another. This is
by no means a substitute for backing up those files as those drives can
become corrupted or the whole hard drive itself might fail but using
separate partitions as described is a convenience. I even keep a copy of my
backup on a separate partition for quick and easy retrieval but I also have
one copy off the hard drive to protect against the possibility of hard drive
failure.
>
> 3. How large is the MS Office Pro program? Since I won't have an
> installation disk on hand, I am wondering if I should have it installed
> into its own file so that if I want to use a feature that isn't
> installed, I can point my computer to it (that sort of tech support
> takes practically forever in terms of weeks). Or should I have it
> fully installed with all the bells and whistles, even though I may not
> have any reason to use them?

I don't fully understand the question. If you don't have an installation
disk, they must give you some means of recovery, either a separate, often
hidden partition, the actual setup disks or a recovery disk that has an
image of your entire factory fresh setup. You will need to inquire of the
OEM precisely how they handle this. Since the new computer has already
arrived but still in the box, I would assume the notion of how to install
office is a moot point as it is either installed or it isn't.
>
> 4. Is there a compelling reason to convert my HD to Dynamic Disk, if
> it's not already dynamic?

Not that I'm aware.
>
> TIA
> sf
>
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 5:39:17 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

In news:1112120589.243389.131630@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com,
sf <sfpipeline@gmail.com> typed:

> My old computer died and the new one is here - still in the
> box,
> though. So, here I am - taking the plunge into XP newusers.
>
> I have a few questions:
>
> 1. My new xp has Media Edition OEM. I read that media edition
> a
> version of XP Pro. Is that true? If so, I won't need to
> install XP
> Pro. If not, what are the vital differences between the two?


Yes, it's true. It's XP Professional with additional features. I
don't have a list of those additional features handy, but I'm
sure you can easily find them on the Microsoft web site.


> 2. My new HD is 80 GIGs. Should I partition it? I was
> thinking one
> partition could be media related and the other Office related
> because
> my work will install Office Pro for me.


First, a word on the terminology. You *must* partition it.
Partitioning is the act of creating one or more partitions on the
drive, and without at least one partition, you can't use it.

So I assume what you meant to ask whether you should have more
than one partition. Although some people will tell you "yes," and
others will tell you "no," my answer is "it depends." There's no
answer to this question that's right for everyone. Don't have
multiple partitions just to separate one kind of thing from
another (media vs. work, for example); folders can work just as
well for that. The main reasons for having multiple partitions,
in my view, are for booting multiple operating systems, and
because a particular partitioning scheme gets along better with
your backup scheme.



> 3. How large is the MS Office Pro program?


It depends on what features you install, but I'm not an MS Office
expert and I'll leave this question to others.


> Since I won't have an
> installation disk on hand, I am wondering if I should have it
> installed into its own file


"Its own file"? Sorry, I don't understand what you mean by that.
Do you mean its own folder? It has to be installed into its own
folder. Do you mean its own partition? There no good reason I can
think of to do that.


> so that if I want to use a feature that
> isn't installed, I can point my computer to it


Sorry, I don't understand that either. If it isn't installed, and
you don't have the CD, you can't use the feature.


> (that sort of tech
> support takes practically forever in terms of weeks). Or
> should I
> have it fully installed with all the bells and whistles, even
> though
> I may not have any reason to use them?


That's really the kind of question that nobody but you can
answer. You have to judge the likelihood of your wanting some
feature in the future that you don't want now, and weigh that
against the cost in disk space of installing it now.


> 4. Is there a compelling reason to convert my HD to Dynamic
> Disk, if
> it's not already dynamic?


There's not only not a compelling reason, it would probably be a
serious mistake for the great majority of people. Unless you have
a clear reason to do this, don't.

--
Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
Please reply to the newsgroup
Related resources
March 29, 2005 6:34:30 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Gordon wrote:
> Robert Moir wrote:
>
> >>2. My new HD is 80 GIGs. Should I partition it? I was thinking
one
> >>partition could be media related and the other Office related
because
> >>my work will install Office Pro for me.
> >
> >
> > This is down to personal feelings, I have to admit I do partition
things
> > into a "relatively" small 30gb system partition for programs, and
move data
> > to other drives.
>
> Pretty much common sense these days. OS on one partition, data on
> another. If the OS goes then you shouldn't need to back up all your
data
> before reformatting the OS partition and re-installing......

It does sound like common sense, but I've never heard of it before.
So, how is that done? I mean both how is it set up and how would my
computer find the OS in a different partition. I thought every
partition needed its own OS unless the disk is dynamic.

TIA
sf
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 6:50:07 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

sf

Answers are interposed below..

--
Mike Hall
MVP - Windows Shell/user

http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm





"sf" <sfpipeline@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1112120589.243389.131630@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> I'm migrating over here from win98.gen_discussion. They are a
> wonderful group of MVPs, but they have officially given me my walking
> papers.
>
> :) 
>
> My old computer died and the new one is here - still in the box,
> though. So, here I am - taking the plunge into XP newusers.
>
> I have a few questions:
>
> 1. My new xp has Media Edition OEM. I read that media edition a
> version of XP Pro. Is that true? If so, I won't need to install XP
> Pro. If not, what are the vital differences between the two?


It is a version of XP..
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/evaluation/compare.m... .. unless you
particularly need heavy file security or connection to a domain, an XP Pro
installation will remove some of the features of the Media version.. read
the link.. one assumes at the point of choosing that the user has determined
what OS version is best.. why would you have picked a computer with Media
Edition installed, if you didn't want the features that it affords..


>
> 2. My new HD is 80 GIGs. Should I partition it? I was thinking one
> partition could be media related and the other Office related because
> my work will install Office Pro for me.


Best left as it is.. you can use folders to sort your work.. saves having to
use 3rd party partitioning utilities..


>
> 3. How large is the MS Office Pro program? Since I won't have an
> installation disk on hand, I am wondering if I should have it installed
> into its own file so that if I want to use a feature that isn't
> installed, I can point my computer to it (that sort of tech support
> takes practically forever in terms of weeks). Or should I have it
> fully installed with all the bells and whistles, even though I may not
> have any reason to use them?


A full installation of MS Office is not actually that large.. certainly not
enough to make a difference to an 80gb drive.. it installs into its own
'file' anyway.. leave the default installation path as it is..


>
> 4. Is there a compelling reason to convert my HD to Dynamic Disk, if
> it's not already dynamic?


None at all as bought from a store for use as a standalone home system..

>
> TIA
> sf
>
March 29, 2005 6:55:04 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Michael Solomon (MS-MVP) wrote:
> In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.
>
> >
> > 3. How large is the MS Office Pro program? Since I won't have an
> > installation disk on hand, I am wondering if I should have it
installed
> > into its own file so that if I want to use a feature that isn't
> > installed, I can point my computer to it (that sort of tech support
> > takes practically forever in terms of weeks). Or should I have it
> > fully installed with all the bells and whistles, even though I may
not
> > have any reason to use them?
>
> I don't fully understand the question.

Just thinking ahead. What if I want to tweek it? If I decide I need a
feature, like equation editor, I'll need the disk.

> If you don't have an installation
> disk, they must give you some means of recovery, either a separate,
often
> hidden partition, the actual setup disks or a recovery disk that has
an
> image of your entire factory fresh setup. You will need to inquire
of the
> OEM precisely how they handle this. Since the new computer has
already
> arrived but still in the box, I would assume the notion of how to
install
> office is a moot point as it is either installed or it isn't.
> >

My workplace is installing Office Pro for me (I work at home too) and
they don't hand out recovery disks to my knowledge. We're expected to
submit a blue form and wait for them to get around to us. I asked
because the types of things I foresee needing this for would put me at
the bottom of their "to do" list. They will also install XP Pro, but
it sounds like I won't need it from the previous responses.

I need to need to be as specific as possible with my requests so they
won't play dumb - it will make my life easier in the long run.

Thanks,
sf
March 29, 2005 7:25:24 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Mike Hall (MS-MVP) wrote:
> sf
>
> "sf" <sfpipeline@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1112120589.243389.131630@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> > I'm migrating over here from win98.gen_discussion. They are a
> > wonderful group of MVPs, but they have officially given me my
walking
> > papers.
> >
> > :) 
> >
> > My old computer died and the new one is here - still in the box,
> > though. So, here I am - taking the plunge into XP newusers.
> >
> > I have a few questions:
> >
> > 1. My new xp has Media Edition OEM. I read that media edition is
a
> > version of XP Pro. Is that true? If so, I won't need to install
XP
> > Pro. If not, what are the vital differences between the two?
>
> It is a version of XP..
> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/evaluation/compare.m... .. unless
you
> particularly need heavy file security or connection to a domain, an
XP Pro
> installation will remove some of the features of the Media version..
read
> the link.. one assumes at the point of choosing that the user has
determined
> what OS version is best.. why would you have picked a computer with
Media
> Edition installed, if you didn't want the features that it affords..
>
LOL! My only criteria was "FREE" after I found out my workplace would
install XP Pro and Office Pro (saving me a couple of hundred $$). I'd
never heard of the media edition before I selected it and obviously, I
don't know a single person who uses it. Now that I'm looking at it,
I'm wondering if it's not so bad after all.

I know Dell wanted to sell me a $600+ monitor for TV viewing, but all I
want is a little picture in picture to "watch" TV in real time while I
word process or post to newsgroups. Do they sell that type of card
anymore?
>
> >
> > 2. My new HD is 80 GIGs. Should I partition it? I was thinking
one
> > partition could be media related and the other Office related
because
> > my work will install Office Pro for me.
>
>
> Best left as it is.. you can use folders to sort your work.. saves
having to
> use 3rd party partitioning utilities..
>
That's the way I usually deal with files, but I was told that XP can
partition itself. What about defragging? How many hours does it take
to do 80 GIGs?
>
> > 3. How large is the MS Office Pro program?
<snip>
>
> A full installation of MS Office is not actually that large..
certainly not
> enough to make a difference to an 80gb drive.. it installs into its
own
> 'file' anyway.. leave the default installation path as it is..
>
So, I will be able to access features w/o a disk?
>

Thanks,
sf
March 29, 2005 7:33:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

PA Bear wrote:
> sf wrote:
> > I'm migrating over here from win98.gen_discussion. They are a
> > wonderful group of MVPs, but they have officially given me my
walking
> > papers.
>
> But did anyone invite you in /here/? <eg>
>
> Welcome aboard, sf!
> --
> ~PA Bear

Hi big fella... didn't know you hang out here too! It's good to see a
familiar face. :) 

What do you have to say about 2 40gb partitions? One would be XP Pro
and the other Media Edition. The more I read about media edition, the
funner (not a typo) it sounds. When I ordered it, I was going to dump
it for XP Pro, but now I'm not so sure.

Thanks,
sf
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 7:38:30 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

This and your other question are really the same. In both cases, you'll
need to contact your system administrator or express your concerns to the
Sys Admin or IT at your company responsible for such things. I can't offer
you advice about this because the installation and disk are controlled by
them.

--
In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.

Michael Solomon MS-MVP
Windows Shell/User
https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/


"sf" <sfpipeline@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1112136904.797398.117490@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
> Michael Solomon (MS-MVP) wrote:
>> In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.
>>
>> >
>> > 3. How large is the MS Office Pro program? Since I won't have an
>> > installation disk on hand, I am wondering if I should have it
> installed
>> > into its own file so that if I want to use a feature that isn't
>> > installed, I can point my computer to it (that sort of tech support
>> > takes practically forever in terms of weeks). Or should I have it
>> > fully installed with all the bells and whistles, even though I may
> not
>> > have any reason to use them?
>>
>> I don't fully understand the question.
>
> Just thinking ahead. What if I want to tweek it? If I decide I need a
> feature, like equation editor, I'll need the disk.
>
>> If you don't have an installation
>> disk, they must give you some means of recovery, either a separate,
> often
>> hidden partition, the actual setup disks or a recovery disk that has
> an
>> image of your entire factory fresh setup. You will need to inquire
> of the
>> OEM precisely how they handle this. Since the new computer has
> already
>> arrived but still in the box, I would assume the notion of how to
> install
>> office is a moot point as it is either installed or it isn't.
>> >
>
> My workplace is installing Office Pro for me (I work at home too) and
> they don't hand out recovery disks to my knowledge. We're expected to
> submit a blue form and wait for them to get around to us. I asked
> because the types of things I foresee needing this for would put me at
> the bottom of their "to do" list. They will also install XP Pro, but
> it sounds like I won't need it from the previous responses.
>
> I need to need to be as specific as possible with my requests so they
> won't play dumb - it will make my life easier in the long run.
>
> Thanks,
> sf
>
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 9:23:32 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

sf wrote:
> I'm migrating over here from win98.gen_discussion. They are a
> wonderful group of MVPs, but they have officially given me my walking
> papers.

But did anyone invite you in /here/? <eg>

Welcome aboard, sf!
--
~PA Bear
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 9:44:28 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

In news:1112139230.553021.140260@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com,
sf <sfpipeline@gmail.com> typed:

> What do you have to say about 2 40gb partitions? One would be
> XP Pro
> and the other Media Edition.


Since XP Professional is a subset of Media Edition, there is
little if any point in dual-booting between them. There's nothing
in XP Professional that's not also in Media Edition. Just install
Media Edition.

--
Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
Please reply to the newsgroup
March 30, 2005 12:33:28 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Robert Moir wrote:

>>2. My new HD is 80 GIGs. Should I partition it? I was thinking one
>>partition could be media related and the other Office related because
>>my work will install Office Pro for me.
>
>
> This is down to personal feelings, I have to admit I do partition things
> into a "relatively" small 30gb system partition for programs, and move data
> to other drives.

Pretty much common sense these days. OS on one partition, data on
another. If the OS goes then you shouldn't need to back up all your data
before reformatting the OS partition and re-installing......
Anonymous
March 30, 2005 12:33:29 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Gordon

Data is best saved away from the primary drive, which is more likely to fail
than a second 'slave' hard drive.. HDD failure will inevitably render all
partitions useless..

I partitioned my 40's into equal parts, but was re-installing so nothing
lost.. the OP has a fresh Media XP and would be silly to lose it at this
stage..

--
Mike Hall
MVP - Windows Shell/user

http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm





"Gordon" <gordonbp1@yahoo.co.uk.invalid> wrote in message
news:eC1PPaJNFHA.1476@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Robert Moir wrote:
>
>>>2. My new HD is 80 GIGs. Should I partition it? I was thinking one
>>>partition could be media related and the other Office related because
>>>my work will install Office Pro for me.
>>
>>
>> This is down to personal feelings, I have to admit I do partition things
>> into a "relatively" small 30gb system partition for programs, and move
>> data to other drives.
>
> Pretty much common sense these days. OS on one partition, data on another.
> If the OS goes then you shouldn't need to back up all your data before
> reformatting the OS partition and re-installing......
Anonymous
March 30, 2005 12:40:12 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

What Robert & Ken said.

sf wrote:
> PA Bear wrote:
> > sf wrote:
> > > I'm migrating over here from win98.gen_discussion. They are a
> > > wonderful group of MVPs, but they have officially given me my walking
> > > papers.
> >
> > But did anyone invite you in /here/? <eg>
> >
> > Welcome aboard, sf!
> > --
> > ~PA Bear
>
> Hi big fella... didn't know you hang out here too! It's good to see a
> familiar face. :) 
>
> What do you have to say about 2 40gb partitions? One would be XP Pro
> and the other Media Edition. The more I read about media edition, the
> funner (not a typo) it sounds. When I ordered it, I was going to dump
> it for XP Pro, but now I'm not so sure.
>
> Thanks,
> sf
Anonymous
March 30, 2005 11:38:06 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

On 29 Mar 2005 10:23:09 -0800, sf wrote:

> 3. How large is the MS Office Pro program? Since I won't have an
> installation disk on hand, I am wondering if I should have it installed
> into its own file so that if I want to use a feature that isn't
> installed, I can point my computer to it (that sort of tech support
> takes practically forever in terms of weeks). Or should I have it
> fully installed with all the bells and whistles, even though I may not
> have any reason to use them?

I agree with Robert Moir that you should get a copy of the Office CD
(Office 2003, correct?). It's handy to have when you want to add/remove
features or repair the installation. Most important: When visiting the
Office Update page, it is not unusual to get a request that the CD be
inserted before the updates will install.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
March 31, 2005 2:55:53 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Hi Robert... I was kicked off of google for a while (too much posting).

I was trying to find out what if any difference there are between XP
Pro and media edition. Is ME a full on XP Pro with added goodies or a
cut down version like Home XP? If it's cut down, what's missing?

TIA
`````````````````````


Robert Moir wrote:
> sf wrote:
>
> >
> > What do you have to say about 2 40gb partitions? One would be XP
Pro
> > and the other Media Edition. The more I read about media edition,
the
> > funner (not a typo) it sounds. When I ordered it, I was going to
dump
> > it for XP Pro, but now I'm not so sure.
>
> If I may be so bold as to intrude here, why install XP Pro at all?
Unless
> you need a few of the specifc different issues between media edition
and Pro
> (and these are uncommon in the home) then you won't notice a
difference.
>
> I run XP Media Centre Edition 2005 on both my Windows machines at
home. It
> works fine for me. It doesn't get in the way of the things I do at
home at
> all. I can run visual studio, Office, Virtual PC just as well on
Media
> Centre as I did on XP Pro before.
>
>
> --
> --
> Rob Moir
> Website - http://www.robertmoir.co.uk
> Virtual PC 2004 FAQ -
http://www.robertmoir.co.uk/win/VirtualPC2004FAQ.html
> Kazaa - Software update services for your Viruses and Spyware.
March 31, 2005 3:06:41 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

On Tue, 29 Mar 2005 17:44:28 -0700, "Ken Blake"
<kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote:

>In news:1112139230.553021.140260@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com,
>sf <sfpipeline@gmail.com> typed:
>
>> What do you have to say about 2 40gb partitions? One would be
>> XP Pro
>> and the other Media Edition.
>
>
>Since XP Professional is a subset of Media Edition, there is
>little if any point in dual-booting between them. There's nothing
>in XP Professional that's not also in Media Edition. Just install
>Media Edition.


I have media edition now. and I was wondering if I was missing any
features of Pro - if so, I'll have Pro installed.

:) 
March 31, 2005 3:51:46 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

On Tue, 29 Mar 2005 13:39:17 -0700, "Ken Blake"
<kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote:

>In news:1112120589.243389.131630@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com,
>sf <sfpipeline@gmail.com> typed:
>
>> My old computer died and the new one is here - still in the
>> box,
>> though. So, here I am - taking the plunge into XP newusers.

My computer is out of the box and oh, man, it's FAST. Woooo Hooo!
I had no idea what dual channel SDRAM could do. I downloaded over
100,000 news group titles in about 5 seconds flat. But for some
reason, headers in selected groups take a bit longer... I think it
took about 2 minutes to download over 200,000 in one of my news
groups.

<sob>
just kidding

LOL! This is going to be great!

>>
>> I have a few questions:
>>
>> 1. My new xp has Media Edition OEM. I read that media edition
>> a
>> version of XP Pro. Is that true? If so, I won't need to
>> install XP
>> Pro. If not, what are the vital differences between the two?
>
>
>Yes, it's true. It's XP Professional with additional features. I
>don't have a list of those additional features handy, but I'm
>sure you can easily find them on the Microsoft web site.
>
Actually, I had already looked it up and what I found wasn't very
helpful. That's why I asked. Thanks anyway.

>> 2. My new HD is 80 GIGs. Should I partition it? I was
>> thinking one
>> partition could be media related and the other Office related
>> because
>> my work will install Office Pro for me.
>
>
>First, a word on the terminology. You *must* partition it.
>Partitioning is the act of creating one or more partitions on the
>drive, and without at least one partition, you can't use it.
>
>So I assume what you meant to ask whether you should have more
>than one partition.

The partition question was based on the assumption that there is
already ONE partition and I was wondering if two or more would be
beneficial for any reason.

>Although some people will tell you "yes," and
>others will tell you "no," my answer is "it depends." There's no
>answer to this question that's right for everyone. Don't have
>multiple partitions just to separate one kind of thing from
>another (media vs. work, for example); folders can work just as
>well for that.

Thanks. I have always used folders that way and was wondering if
partitions would be of better use. Although it's never happened to
me, I'm always hearing about crashes and figured if it crashes at
least either my media or my data wouldn't be lost... if I had them in
separate partitions.

As puny as 80 GB seems to some here, it's big to me and certainly
could be partitioned. But quite frankly, "partitions" sound like a
lot of work and I'd rather not deal with it unless there is a real
reason. It sounds like I should partition if I wanted to run a
different OS, but not to separate specific applications or things like
media vs. office work.

>The main reasons for having multiple partitions,
>in my view, are for booting multiple operating systems, and
>because a particular partitioning scheme gets along better with
>your backup scheme.
>
So far the verdict is that media edition and Pro are virtually the
same program, so it's a waste of effort to partiton... correct? My
original query was based on the incorrect (?) assumption they were
different.

Are they the "same" in the way Home Office and Office Pro are the same
or are they really identical?
>
>
>> 3. How large is the MS Office Pro program?
>
>
>It depends on what features you install, but I'm not an MS Office
>expert and I'll leave this question to others.
>
>
>> Since I won't have an
>> installation disk on hand, I am wondering if I should have it
>> installed into its own file
>
>
>"Its own file"? Sorry, I don't understand what you mean by that.
>Do you mean its own folder? It has to be installed into its own
>folder. Do you mean its own partition? There no good reason I can
>think of to do that.
>
I misspoke. Folder.

>> so that if I want to use a feature that
>> isn't installed, I can point my computer to it
>
>
>Sorry, I don't understand that either. If it isn't installed, and
>you don't have the CD, you can't use the feature.
>
>
>> (that sort of tech
>> support takes practically forever in terms of weeks). Or
>> should I
>> have it fully installed with all the bells and whistles, even
>> though
>> I may not have any reason to use them?
>
>
>That's really the kind of question that nobody but you can
>answer. You have to judge the likelihood of your wanting some
>feature in the future that you don't want now, and weigh that
>against the cost in disk space of installing it now.
>

newsgroups like this make me aware of features I haven't yet
discovered, so I'll have it fully installed into its own folder. I'm
not concerned about disk space. If I was, I would have ordered a
larger HD.

>
>> 4. Is there a compelling reason to convert my HD to Dynamic
>> Disk, if
>> it's not already dynamic?
>
>
>There's not only not a compelling reason, it would probably be a
>serious mistake for the great majority of people. Unless you have
>a clear reason to do this, don't.

Thanks.
sf
Anonymous
March 31, 2005 1:16:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

In news:ti8n411bgbj0b37i676ffarn536fi53p6i@4ax.com,
sf <sf@gEEmail.com> typed:

> On Tue, 29 Mar 2005 13:39:17 -0700, "Ken Blake"
> <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote:
>

>> Although some people will tell you "yes," and
>> others will tell you "no," my answer is "it depends." There's
>> no
>> answer to this question that's right for everyone. Don't have
>> multiple partitions just to separate one kind of thing from
>> another (media vs. work, for example); folders can work just
>> as
>> well for that.
>
> Thanks. I have always used folders that way and was wondering
> if
> partitions would be of better use. Although it's never
> happened to
> me, I'm always hearing about crashes and figured if it crashes
> at
> least either my media or my data wouldn't be lost... if I had
> them in
> separate partitions.


That's a typical use of multiple partitions that I'm very much
against. Your data is just barely safer by being in a second
partition, and you should never rely on that. A hard drive crash
will cause the loss of both partitions simultaneously, as can
virus attacks, severe power glitches such as nearby lighning
strickes, theft of the computer, etc.

The way to protect your data is by backing it up to external
media.


>
> As puny as 80 GB seems to some here, it's big to me and
> certainly
> could be partitioned. But quite frankly, "partitions" sound
> like a
> lot of work and I'd rather not deal with it unless there is a
> real
> reason. It sounds like I should partition if I wanted to run a
> different OS, but not to separate specific applications or
> things like
> media vs. office work.


Right.


>> The main reasons for having multiple partitions,
>> in my view, are for booting multiple operating systems, and
>> because a particular partitioning scheme gets along better
>> with
>> your backup scheme.
>>
> So far the verdict is that media edition and Pro are virtually
> the
> same program, so it's a waste of effort to partiton... correct?
> My
> original query was based on the incorrect (?) assumption they
> were
> different.


No, I wouldn't say "a waste of effort." Once again, it depends.
If you mean having multiple partitions to install Media Edition
and Professional, *that* makes no sense.


> Are they the "same" in the way Home Office and Office Pro are
> the same
> or are they really identical?


They are identical except that Media Edition includes the extra
media features.


>>
>>> 3. How large is the MS Office Pro program?
>>
>>
>> It depends on what features you install, but I'm not an MS
>> Office
>> expert and I'll leave this question to others.
>>
>>
>>> Since I won't have an
>>> installation disk on hand, I am wondering if I should have it
>>> installed into its own file
>>
>>
>> "Its own file"? Sorry, I don't understand what you mean by
>> that.
>> Do you mean its own folder? It has to be installed into its
>> own
>> folder. Do you mean its own partition? There no good reason I
>> can
>> think of to do that.
>>
> I misspoke. Folder.


OK, folder. But I still don't understand. As I said, "It has to
be installed into its own folder."

>
>>> so that if I want to use a feature that
>>> isn't installed, I can point my computer to it
>>
>>
>> Sorry, I don't understand that either. If it isn't installed,
>> and
>> you don't have the CD, you can't use the feature.
>>
>>
>>> (that sort of tech
>>> support takes practically forever in terms of weeks). Or
>>> should I
>>> have it fully installed with all the bells and whistles, even
>>> though
>>> I may not have any reason to use them?
>>
>>
>> That's really the kind of question that nobody but you can
>> answer. You have to judge the likelihood of your wanting some
>> feature in the future that you don't want now, and weigh that
>> against the cost in disk space of installing it now.
>>
>
> newsgroups like this make me aware of features I haven't yet
> discovered, so I'll have it fully installed into its own
> folder. I'm
> not concerned about disk space. If I was, I would have ordered
> a
> larger HD.
>
>>
>>> 4. Is there a compelling reason to convert my HD to Dynamic
>>> Disk, if
>>> it's not already dynamic?
>>
>>
>> There's not only not a compelling reason, it would probably be
>> a
>> serious mistake for the great majority of people. Unless you
>> have
>> a clear reason to do this, don't.
>
> Thanks.


You're welcome. Glad to help.

--
Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
Please reply to the newsgroup
April 1, 2005 3:34:22 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 09:51:20 +0100, "Robert Moir"
<robspamtrap+msnews@gmail.com> wrote:

>sf wrote:
>> Hi Robert... I was kicked off of google for a while (too much
>> posting).
>>
>> I was trying to find out what if any difference there are between XP
>> Pro and media edition. Is ME a full on XP Pro with added goodies or a
>> cut down version like Home XP? If it's cut down, what's missing?
>
>As far as I know the only thing thats missing is a few networking things
>such as the ability to join a Windows Server domain. This usually isn't a
>problem for most people who are not on a corporate business network - unless
>you know for sure that you will definately be joining this machine to a
>domain then I would stick with what you have because thats the only real
>difference I can remember and its not at all relevant for 95% of home users.
>
>Let me put it this way, my home usuage isn't typical. I own 4 computers at
>home, 1 of which IS a windows 2003 server setup as a domain controller, 1 of
>which is is an apple ibook, and 2 of which are windows xp media centre
>desktops. And i've got access to all versions of Windows XP because i'm a
>MVP with a MSDN subscription so its not like it would be a bother to find
>the disks to do it, and i've never felt the need to change either of my
>desktop computers from MCE2005 back to XP Pro.
>

Thanks Robert! That makes me feel a lot more secure... I can always
have XP Pro installed later if there's a real need for it.

:) 
sf
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 5:33:28 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Sharon F wrote:
> On 29 Mar 2005 10:23:09 -0800, sf wrote:
>
>> 3. How large is the MS Office Pro program? Since I won't have an
>> installation disk on hand, I am wondering if I should have it
>> installed into its own file so that if I want to use a feature that
>> isn't installed, I can point my computer to it (that sort of tech
>> support takes practically forever in terms of weeks). Or should I
>> have it fully installed with all the bells and whistles, even though
>> I may not have any reason to use them?
>
> I agree with Robert Moir that you should get a copy of the Office CD
> (Office 2003, correct?). It's handy to have when you want to
> add/remove features or repair the installation. Most important: When
> visiting the Office Update page, it is not unusual to get a request
> that the CD be inserted before the updates will install.

Only if you chose to delete the installation files. If you didn't, then no
disc will be called for (though I agree, a backup is always prudent ;o))

--
In memory of MS MVP Alex Nichol: http://www.dts-l.org/
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 5:33:29 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

On Fri, 1 Apr 2005 01:33:28 +0100, Miss Perspicacia Tick wrote:

> Only if you chose to delete the installation files. If you didn't, then no
> disc will be called for (though I agree, a backup is always prudent ;o))

Really? I have retained the setup files on both of my systems and have been
asked to supply the disks with some of the updates. I would wonder why that
happens but since the CDs are always on hand (Office and Front Page) I just
stick them in when prompted. It's less work to do that than to figure out
why. The tablet PC on the other hand gets dragged everywhere and because of
past experiences, I won't update Office on it unless I have the CDs handy.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
April 1, 2005 5:33:30 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 23:40:14 -0600, Sharon F <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org>
wrote:

>On Fri, 1 Apr 2005 01:33:28 +0100, Miss Perspicacia Tick wrote:
>
>> Only if you chose to delete the installation files. If you didn't, then no
>> disc will be called for (though I agree, a backup is always prudent ;o))
>
>Really? I have retained the setup files on both of my systems and have been
>asked to supply the disks with some of the updates. I would wonder why that
>happens but since the CDs are always on hand (Office and Front Page) I just
>stick them in when prompted. It's less work to do that than to figure out
>why. The tablet PC on the other hand gets dragged everywhere and because of
>past experiences, I won't update Office on it unless I have the CDs handy.

Whoa, controversy! That's why I asked. The help disk tech who told
me it could be done apparently has it in a folder on his computer...
but I just couldn't believe in my heart of hearts that it's possible.
Now I know I'm not crazy!

BTW: was that previous comment about licensing really correct? Is it
okay to burn a personal CD when the license is for the entire
district/company? It certainly seems logical, especially when you're
in a situation like mine where IT won't be out to insert the disk for
you in less than a week or two.... if it's that quick.

:) 
sf
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 1:39:43 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 23:46:33 -0800, sf wrote:

> Whoa, controversy! That's why I asked. The help disk tech who told
> me it could be done apparently has it in a folder on his computer...
> but I just couldn't believe in my heart of hearts that it's possible.
> Now I know I'm not crazy!
>
> BTW: was that previous comment about licensing really correct? Is it
> okay to burn a personal CD when the license is for the entire
> district/company? It certainly seems logical, especially when you're
> in a situation like mine where IT won't be out to insert the disk for
> you in less than a week or two.... if it's that quick.

Not really controversy but a difference between what is supposed to happen
and what can happen.

The setup files I've retained were created by Office Setup. Not quite the
same thing as having a copy of the CD on the hard drive as you've
mentioned. Office 2003 setup prompt if you want to retain setup files or
not. If you have the hard disk space and keep them, they *will* be used for
on the fly repairs of the Office programs. Apparently in theory they should
cover you at Windows update as well but that has not happened for me.

Aside: I did direct them to a different hard drive instead of using the
default location. This is an option that is offered from the same prompt
but maybe the different location is why Office Update asks me for the CD
when it shouldn't.

And yes. I believe the previous comment about licensing is correct. Think
of the license as being bound to the set of 25 characters needed to install
the product instead of tied to the CD. You can use any CD of the same type
with your key and it will successfully install. Office Standard key with an
Office Standard CD. Office Enterprise key with Office Enterprise CD (or
whatever they're calling the different packages this time around). You get
the idea, I'm sure. Keep in mind that even though the company license is
broad, IT should be recording who has what installed in case they are
subjected to a software audit.

And if you read the license (boring but can be done ;)  ) it even states
that a duplicate of the install CD can be created for backup purposes. Many
folks prefer to use that duplicate CD instead of their original. This
practice protects the original disk against wear and tear.

Caveat: Some software will have copyright protection builtin to the CD
which causes the program to install *only* from the original disk but that
is not the case with Office. Commonly seen with disks for PC games.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
April 3, 2005 12:11:28 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

On Fri, 1 Apr 2005 09:39:43 -0600, Sharon F <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org>
wrote:
>
>Not really controversy but a difference between what is supposed to happen
>and what can happen.
>
>The setup files I've retained were created by Office Setup. Not quite the
>same thing as having a copy of the CD on the hard drive as you've
>mentioned. Office 2003 setup prompt if you want to retain setup files or
>not. If you have the hard disk space and keep them, they *will* be used for
>on the fly repairs of the Office programs. Apparently in theory they should
>cover you at Windows update as well but that has not happened for me.
>
>Aside: I did direct them to a different hard drive instead of using the
>default location. This is an option that is offered from the same prompt
>but maybe the different location is why Office Update asks me for the CD
>when it shouldn't.

Maybe my next computer will have two hard drives, but I don't even
know if this one has more than one bay for a HD. I feel lucky just to
have both a CD and a DVD.

:) 
>
>And yes. I believe the previous comment about licensing is correct. Think
>of the license as being bound to the set of 25 characters needed to install
>the product instead of tied to the CD. You can use any CD of the same type
>with your key and it will successfully install. Office Standard key with an
>Office Standard CD. Office Enterprise key with Office Enterprise CD (or
>whatever they're calling the different packages this time around). You get
>the idea, I'm sure. Keep in mind that even though the company license is
>broad, IT should be recording who has what installed in case they are
>subjected to a software audit.
>
I'm sure they do... they are well aquainted with the wrath of
Microsoft. LOL!
>
>And if you read the license (boring but can be done ;)  ) it even states
>that a duplicate of the install CD can be created for backup purposes. Many
>folks prefer to use that duplicate CD instead of their original. This
>practice protects the original disk against wear and tear.
>
I'll have them burn me a copy AND install it to a separete folder. I
absolutely hate searching for CDs (even when they're where they're
supposed to be).
>
>Caveat: Some software will have copyright protection builtin to the CD
>which causes the program to install *only* from the original disk but that
>is not the case with Office. Commonly seen with disks for PC games.
>
Glad you brought that up... it's my experience that yes, you can
"install" them, but to RUN them you still need to insert the disk
every time. Is there some way around that problem?

````````````````````````````
Anonymous
April 3, 2005 12:52:41 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

On Sat, 02 Apr 2005 20:11:28 -0800, sf wrote:

> Glad you brought that up... it's my experience that yes, you can
> "install" them, but to RUN them you still need to insert the disk
> every time. Is there some way around that problem?

I've had them flatout not install where it's possible to install the entire
game onto the hard drive.

There are other games (and other types of software) that have an install CD
and a Run CD. With some of these you can use something like Virtual Drive
(http://www.farstone.com/) to create a virtual CD drive. But have seen some
copyrighted CDs balk at working with this solution as well.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
April 3, 2005 3:52:07 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

On Sun, 3 Apr 2005 08:52:41 -0500, Sharon F <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org>
wrote:

> On Sat, 02 Apr 2005 20:11:28 -0800, sf wrote:
>
> > Glad you brought that up... it's my experience that yes, you can
> > "install" them, but to RUN them you still need to insert the disk
> > every time. Is there some way around that problem?
>
> I've had them flatout not install where it's possible to install the entire
> game onto the hard drive.
>
> There are other games (and other types of software) that have an install CD
> and a Run CD. With some of these you can use something like Virtual Drive
> (http://www.farstone.com/) to create a virtual CD drive. But have seen some
> copyrighted CDs balk at working with this solution as well.

Thanks, Sharon... I'll take a look at Virtual Drive.

:) 
sf
Anonymous
April 3, 2005 5:32:33 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

On Sun, 3 Apr 2005 08:52:41 -0500, Sharon F wrote:

> I've had them flatout not install where it's possible to install the entire
> game onto the hard drive.

Edit that to "where it should be possible to install the entire game"
(Original post written early on a Sunday. What can I say?)

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
Anonymous
April 3, 2005 6:12:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

On Sun, 03 Apr 2005 11:52:07 -0700, sf wrote:

> Thanks, Sharon... I'll take a look at Virtual Drive.

You're welcome, sf and good luck!

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
!