What is bitfling in bitpim

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

I downloaded bitpim 7.12. What is bitfling?
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More about what bitfling bitpim
  1. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    C C wrote:
    > I downloaded bitpim 7.12. What is bitfling?

    If you looked in the online help, you would have found this:

    http://bitpim.sourceforge.net/testhelp/bitfling.htm

    Roger
  2. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    I asked a question earlier about using an aircard installed in other
    machines on a network, added later, was that the older mobile office works
    (allows others to use the share the device), but the updated current version
    (for broadband and NA rather than just NationalAccess) no longer allows it.
    I'm wondering if a bitpim/bitfling combo running on one machine would allow
    other users on a network to use the connection from the machine that
    actually has the hardware.
    There's actually three questions in the above,
    one) can bit pim be used with a dedicated machine on the network with an
    aircard,
    two) can it be used with a dedicated machine that has a cellphone/cable/etc,
    three) can it be used with a wireless network

    Anyone have any thoughts? (I'd just ask Roger, but he requested that he not
    be bothered with q's, so I'm trying to respect that and ask others :)


    "Roger Binns" <rogerb@rogerbinns.com> wrote in message
    news:av1pq1-gr7.ln1@home.rogerbinns.com...
    > C C wrote:
    > > I downloaded bitpim 7.12. What is bitfling?
    >
    > If you looked in the online help, you would have found this:
    >
    > http://bitpim.sourceforge.net/testhelp/bitfling.htm
    >
    > Roger
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Peter Pan wrote:
    > I'm wondering if a bitpim/bitfling combo running on one machine would allow
    > other users on a network to use the connection from the machine that
    > actually has the hardware.

    Nope. It basically remotes the serial port the phone provides. The
    aircards do emulate a serial port and expose their embedded file system
    (all 800kb of it). But that is of no use to you at the networking
    level.

    You need to get the networking level sorted out with the card.
    One of the aircard models (I work with too many ...) creates a
    network interface that exposes the phone/card directly and then
    a second network interface that auto-routes between your LAN and
    the aircard.

    IMHO your best bet is getting a Linux box and putting the card
    in that, and then using the NAT stuff built in to Linux. You
    can use a desktop machine with a PCI to PCMCIA adaptor. The
    Sierra Windows drivers and software are over-engineered too
    userfriendly and get in the way if you actually know how you
    want to structure your network.

    Note that sharing the aircard in the way you want is probably
    against Verizon's terms of service.

    Roger
  4. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    "Roger Binns" <rogerb@rogerbinns.com> wrote in message
    news:8sipq1-t9b.ln1@home.rogerbinns.com...
    > Peter Pan wrote:
    > > I'm wondering if a bitpim/bitfling combo running on one machine would
    allow
    > > other users on a network to use the connection from the machine that
    > > actually has the hardware.
    >
    > Nope. It basically remotes the serial port the phone provides. The
    > aircards do emulate a serial port and expose their embedded file system
    > (all 800kb of it). But that is of no use to you at the networking
    > level.
    >
    > You need to get the networking level sorted out with the card.
    > One of the aircard models (I work with too many ...) creates a
    > network interface that exposes the phone/card directly and then
    > a second network interface that auto-routes between your LAN and
    > the aircard.
    >
    > IMHO your best bet is getting a Linux box and putting the card
    > in that, and then using the NAT stuff built in to Linux. You
    > can use a desktop machine with a PCI to PCMCIA adaptor. The
    > Sierra Windows drivers and software are over-engineered too
    > userfriendly and get in the way if you actually know how you
    > want to structure your network.
    >
    > Note that sharing the aircard in the way you want is probably
    > against Verizon's terms of service.
    >
    > Roger
    >
    >

    Thanks for the answer roger, sorry to bug you about this stuff.

    Yeah, I know it's against the NEW terms of service, but it wasn't against
    the OLD ones (new ones came out a few months ago). Consider the confusion
    here, some (not all) cable modems or DSL modems can be shared resources on
    wireless networks (actually all allow it, but some providers want you to pay
    extra for a business account), and a cellphone with mobile office USED to be
    able to be shared on a network, but now verizon has modified their software
    so you can no longer do it.
    They used to allow the old aircard (NA only) and the older phone/MO to be
    shared, but now that they are going to broadband access, they specifically
    put blocks in the software, so it can't be done anymore and people can't
    share the faster Broadband connection, it just so happens to also block
    sharing the slower NA connection.
    I think what you are saying is that like a sat usually requires a separate
    node on the network to handle the broadband stuff (although it can run under
    windows instead of linux), have a separate linux node on the network and use
    it with the aircard. Hmmm, gives me an idea, get an older used computer with
    pcmcia slots, reformat it with Linux, add an aircard and a wireless card,
    and just make it a stand-alone resource on a WAN that happens to provide
    internet resources (like a node with Direcway can be). Should be able to
    throw it together for well under $1000.

    Marc
  5. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    "Roger Binns" <rogerb@rogerbinns.com> wrote in message
    news:av1pq1-gr7.ln1@home.rogerbinns.com...
    > C C wrote:
    > > I downloaded bitpim 7.12. What is bitfling?
    >
    > If you looked in the online help, you would have found this:
    >
    > http://bitpim.sourceforge.net/testhelp/bitfling.htm
    >
    > Roger
    >
    Thanks. Got it.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Peter Pan wrote:
    > Yeah, I know it's against the NEW terms of service, but it wasn't against
    > the OLD ones (new ones came out a few months ago).

    I do believe that updates in terms of service apply to everyone, not when
    you signed your contract.

    > extra for a business account), and a cellphone with mobile office USED to be
    > able to be shared on a network, but now verizon has modified their software
    > so you can no longer do it.

    You are talking about the technical side, I am talking about your contract
    and the legal side.

    > I think what you are saying is that like a sat usually requires a separate
    > node on the network to handle the broadband stuff (although it can run under
    > windows instead of linux), have a separate linux node on the network and use
    > it with the aircard.

    Windows, Linux and Mac can all share one network interface onto other ones
    (Internet Connection Sharing, NAT etc). However when using Windows you
    are stuck with Sierra's drivers which are intended to be foolproof,
    but just get in the way if you know what you are doing. They have no
    drivers for Linux, but you can just use the card as a standard modem
    supporting PPP and use NAT for your other network interfaces.

    > Hmmm, gives me an idea,

    Err, that is what I should you should do! In any case having a
    seperate machine do all this as well as act as an access point
    and firewall is a good thing. You can change it from cellular
    to DSL, cable or even good old fashioned dial up without having
    to touch your other client machines, and you also have a single
    point of security administration.

    Roger
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