BACKUP

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

I am a newbie. How & what should I backup? I have a dual format burner, but
no 2nd hard drive. Thank You, WEB86
8 answers Last reply
More about backup
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    In news:401B22FE-F7FF-4FB0-88C8-99AE7668B300@microsoft.com,
    WEB86 <WEB86@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:

    > I am a newbie. How & what should I backup? I have a dual format
    > burner, but no 2nd hard drive.


    First of all, almost everyone should be backing up regularly. It
    is always possible that a hard drive crash, user error, nearby
    lightning strike, virus attack, even theft of the computer, can
    cause the loss of everything on your drive. As has often been
    said, it's not a matter of whether you will have such a problem,
    but when.

    Essentially you should back up what you can't afford to
    lose--what you can't readily recreate. What that is depends on
    how you use your computer and what you use it for.

    It takes time and effort to backup, but it also takes time and
    effort to recreate lost data. If you back up daily, you should
    never have to recreate more than one day's worth of last data. If
    weekly, there's potentially a lot more to recreate. You should
    assess how much pain and trouble you would have if you lost x
    days of data, and then choose a backup frequency that doesn't
    involve more pain and trouble than that you would have if you had
    to recreate what was lost.

    At one extreme is the professional user who would likely go out
    of business if his data was lost. He probably needs to back up at
    least daily. At the other extreme is the kid who doesn't use his
    game except to play games. He probably needs no backup at all,
    since worst case he can easily reinstall his games.

    Most of us fall somewhere between those extremes, but nobody can
    tell you where you fall; you need to determine that for yourself.

    Should you back up Windows? Should you back up your applications?
    Most people will tell you no, since you can always reinstall
    these easily from the original media. But I don't think the
    answer is so clear-cut. Many people have substantial time and
    effort invested in customizing Windows and configuring their apps
    to work the way they want to. Putting all of that back the way it
    was can be a difficult, time-consuming effort. Whether you should
    backup up Windows and apps depends, once again, on you.

    How to backup? What software to use? There are many choices,
    including the Windows-supplied backup program. Which choice is
    best for you depends at least in part on the answers to some of
    the questions above.

    Finally what backup media should you choose, and how should it be
    stored? There are many choices, including CDs, tape, zip drives,
    and second hard drives.

    I don't recommend backup to a second non-removable hard drive
    because it leaves you susceptible to simultaneous loss of the
    original and backup to many of the most common dangers: severe
    power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, virus attacks, even
    theft of the computer.

    In my view, secure backup needs to be on removable media, and not
    kept in the computer. For really secure backup (needed, for
    example, if the life of your business depends on your data) you
    should have multiple generations of backup, and at least one of
    those generations should be stored off-site.

    My computer isn't used for business, but my personal backup
    scheme uses two identical removable hard drives, which fit into a
    sleeve installed in the computer. I alternate between the two,
    and use Drive Image to make a complete copy of the primary drive.


    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Excellent question. Backup is a computer user's best friend. If everyone
    would backup, the level of anger and frustration in the world would drop
    sharply and it would be like the Summer of Love all over again.

    All methods of backing up amount to the same thing: Making a copy of what
    you have, so you won't be at a loss if the originals are gone. Backup
    software just makes it more convenient to do that.

    You can backup by burning files and folders to a CD, using Windows' own CD
    burning capability or the third party software that came with your computer,
    whichever is more appealing for you. You can also use Windows' own backup
    program, which is very basic, or purchase third party software for more
    convenience and additional features. After you become more familiar and
    experienced, you may want to try imaging software, which makes an exact copy
    of an entire drive but takes a respectable amount of knowledge to use
    correctly.

    Start by backing up My Documents. You may also want to backup your e-mail
    address book and messages, and your internet favorites or bookmarks. You may
    not need to backup your music, pictures or videos if you already have copies
    on CDs or DVDs. If you have purchased music or video from the internet,
    you'll want to backup the licenses. If you have XP Pro and you have
    encrypted folders and files with it's built-in encryption, you'll need to
    backup the encryption key.

    As you become more sophisticated, you may decide to backup other things,
    like configuration files and other technicalia.

    Modem Ani

    "WEB86" <WEB86@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:401B22FE-F7FF-4FB0-88C8-99AE7668B300@microsoft.com...
    > I am a newbie. How & what should I backup? I have a dual format burner,
    but
    > no 2nd hard drive. Thank You, WEB86
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Thanks for your reply! This may sound stupid, but how do I access the files
    that I want to back-up & do I use MS media player to make the burn & is it
    better to backup on a CD or DVD? Does MS have a tutorial walking me through
    the steps?
    "Modem Ani" wrote:

    > Excellent question. Backup is a computer user's best friend. If everyone
    > would backup, the level of anger and frustration in the world would drop
    > sharply and it would be like the Summer of Love all over again.
    >
    > All methods of backing up amount to the same thing: Making a copy of what
    > you have, so you won't be at a loss if the originals are gone. Backup
    > software just makes it more convenient to do that.
    >
    > You can backup by burning files and folders to a CD, using Windows' own CD
    > burning capability or the third party software that came with your computer,
    > whichever is more appealing for you. You can also use Windows' own backup
    > program, which is very basic, or purchase third party software for more
    > convenience and additional features. After you become more familiar and
    > experienced, you may want to try imaging software, which makes an exact copy
    > of an entire drive but takes a respectable amount of knowledge to use
    > correctly.
    >
    > Start by backing up My Documents. You may also want to backup your e-mail
    > address book and messages, and your internet favorites or bookmarks. You may
    > not need to backup your music, pictures or videos if you already have copies
    > on CDs or DVDs. If you have purchased music or video from the internet,
    > you'll want to backup the licenses. If you have XP Pro and you have
    > encrypted folders and files with it's built-in encryption, you'll need to
    > backup the encryption key.
    >
    > As you become more sophisticated, you may decide to backup other things,
    > like configuration files and other technicalia.
    >
    > Modem Ani
    >
    > "WEB86" <WEB86@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:401B22FE-F7FF-4FB0-88C8-99AE7668B300@microsoft.com...
    > > I am a newbie. How & what should I backup? I have a dual format burner,
    > but
    > > no 2nd hard drive. Thank You, WEB86
    >
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Not sure what you mean by "access the files". If you mean, for example, 'how
    do I find the My Documents folder so I can back it up?' it's located here:

    C:\Documents and Settings\<your account>\My Documents.

    Windows Media Player can record CDs for music and certain types of video,
    but not documents or photos. It is, after all, a media player and not a full
    CD creation program.

    A DVD can hold at least 4.7 GB of information, which is much more than a CD
    can hold - 700 MB - so your choice of CD or DVD depends on how much data you
    want to backup.

    You can learn how to use Windows' own CD burning capability and backup
    program in the Help and Support Center. The Microsoft web site also has good
    information, for example:

    "Backup Basics"
    http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/update/backup.mspx

    Modem Ani

    "WEB86" <WEB86@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:60D54E63-C32A-4969-8ECC-782694B1961E@microsoft.com...
    >
    > Thanks for your reply! This may sound stupid, but how do I access the
    files
    > that I want to back-up & do I use MS media player to make the burn & is it
    > better to backup on a CD or DVD? Does MS have a tutorial walking me
    through
    > the steps?
    > "Modem Ani" wrote:
    >
    > > Excellent question. Backup is a computer user's best friend. If everyone
    > > would backup, the level of anger and frustration in the world would drop
    > > sharply and it would be like the Summer of Love all over again.
    > >
    > > All methods of backing up amount to the same thing: Making a copy of
    what
    > > you have, so you won't be at a loss if the originals are gone. Backup
    > > software just makes it more convenient to do that.
    > >
    > > You can backup by burning files and folders to a CD, using Windows' own
    CD
    > > burning capability or the third party software that came with your
    computer,
    > > whichever is more appealing for you. You can also use Windows' own
    backup
    > > program, which is very basic, or purchase third party software for more
    > > convenience and additional features. After you become more familiar and
    > > experienced, you may want to try imaging software, which makes an exact
    copy
    > > of an entire drive but takes a respectable amount of knowledge to use
    > > correctly.
    > >
    > > Start by backing up My Documents. You may also want to backup your
    e-mail
    > > address book and messages, and your internet favorites or bookmarks. You
    may
    > > not need to backup your music, pictures or videos if you already have
    copies
    > > on CDs or DVDs. If you have purchased music or video from the internet,
    > > you'll want to backup the licenses. If you have XP Pro and you have
    > > encrypted folders and files with it's built-in encryption, you'll need
    to
    > > backup the encryption key.
    > >
    > > As you become more sophisticated, you may decide to backup other things,
    > > like configuration files and other technicalia.
    > >
    > > Modem Ani
    > >
    > > "WEB86" <WEB86@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > > news:401B22FE-F7FF-4FB0-88C8-99AE7668B300@microsoft.com...
    > > > I am a newbie. How & what should I backup? I have a dual format
    burner,
    > > but
    > > > no 2nd hard drive. Thank You, WEB86
    > >
    > >
    > >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Ken, thanks for your help. Can you tell me how I access my files & folders
    to back up? Also, I have a multi-format CD/DVD burner. How would I back up to
    that?
    Thanks, WEB86
    "Ken Blake" wrote:

    > In news:401B22FE-F7FF-4FB0-88C8-99AE7668B300@microsoft.com,
    > WEB86 <WEB86@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:
    >
    > > I am a newbie. How & what should I backup? I have a dual format
    > > burner, but no 2nd hard drive.
    >
    >
    > First of all, almost everyone should be backing up regularly. It
    > is always possible that a hard drive crash, user error, nearby
    > lightning strike, virus attack, even theft of the computer, can
    > cause the loss of everything on your drive. As has often been
    > said, it's not a matter of whether you will have such a problem,
    > but when.
    >
    > Essentially you should back up what you can't afford to
    > lose--what you can't readily recreate. What that is depends on
    > how you use your computer and what you use it for.
    >
    > It takes time and effort to backup, but it also takes time and
    > effort to recreate lost data. If you back up daily, you should
    > never have to recreate more than one day's worth of last data. If
    > weekly, there's potentially a lot more to recreate. You should
    > assess how much pain and trouble you would have if you lost x
    > days of data, and then choose a backup frequency that doesn't
    > involve more pain and trouble than that you would have if you had
    > to recreate what was lost.
    >
    > At one extreme is the professional user who would likely go out
    > of business if his data was lost. He probably needs to back up at
    > least daily. At the other extreme is the kid who doesn't use his
    > game except to play games. He probably needs no backup at all,
    > since worst case he can easily reinstall his games.
    >
    > Most of us fall somewhere between those extremes, but nobody can
    > tell you where you fall; you need to determine that for yourself.
    >
    > Should you back up Windows? Should you back up your applications?
    > Most people will tell you no, since you can always reinstall
    > these easily from the original media. But I don't think the
    > answer is so clear-cut. Many people have substantial time and
    > effort invested in customizing Windows and configuring their apps
    > to work the way they want to. Putting all of that back the way it
    > was can be a difficult, time-consuming effort. Whether you should
    > backup up Windows and apps depends, once again, on you.
    >
    > How to backup? What software to use? There are many choices,
    > including the Windows-supplied backup program. Which choice is
    > best for you depends at least in part on the answers to some of
    > the questions above.
    >
    > Finally what backup media should you choose, and how should it be
    > stored? There are many choices, including CDs, tape, zip drives,
    > and second hard drives.
    >
    > I don't recommend backup to a second non-removable hard drive
    > because it leaves you susceptible to simultaneous loss of the
    > original and backup to many of the most common dangers: severe
    > power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, virus attacks, even
    > theft of the computer.
    >
    > In my view, secure backup needs to be on removable media, and not
    > kept in the computer. For really secure backup (needed, for
    > example, if the life of your business depends on your data) you
    > should have multiple generations of backup, and at least one of
    > those generations should be stored off-site.
    >
    > My computer isn't used for business, but my personal backup
    > scheme uses two identical removable hard drives, which fit into a
    > sleeve installed in the computer. I alternate between the two,
    > and use Drive Image to make a complete copy of the primary drive.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    > Please reply to the newsgroup
    >
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Thanks Modem Ani! I appreciate your help...
    "Modem Ani" wrote:

    > Not sure what you mean by "access the files". If you mean, for example, 'how
    > do I find the My Documents folder so I can back it up?' it's located here:
    >
    > C:\Documents and Settings\<your account>\My Documents.
    >
    > Windows Media Player can record CDs for music and certain types of video,
    > but not documents or photos. It is, after all, a media player and not a full
    > CD creation program.
    >
    > A DVD can hold at least 4.7 GB of information, which is much more than a CD
    > can hold - 700 MB - so your choice of CD or DVD depends on how much data you
    > want to backup.
    >
    > You can learn how to use Windows' own CD burning capability and backup
    > program in the Help and Support Center. The Microsoft web site also has good
    > information, for example:
    >
    > "Backup Basics"
    > http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/update/backup.mspx
    >
    > Modem Ani
    >
    > "WEB86" <WEB86@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:60D54E63-C32A-4969-8ECC-782694B1961E@microsoft.com...
    > >
    > > Thanks for your reply! This may sound stupid, but how do I access the
    > files
    > > that I want to back-up & do I use MS media player to make the burn & is it
    > > better to backup on a CD or DVD? Does MS have a tutorial walking me
    > through
    > > the steps?
    > > "Modem Ani" wrote:
    > >
    > > > Excellent question. Backup is a computer user's best friend. If everyone
    > > > would backup, the level of anger and frustration in the world would drop
    > > > sharply and it would be like the Summer of Love all over again.
    > > >
    > > > All methods of backing up amount to the same thing: Making a copy of
    > what
    > > > you have, so you won't be at a loss if the originals are gone. Backup
    > > > software just makes it more convenient to do that.
    > > >
    > > > You can backup by burning files and folders to a CD, using Windows' own
    > CD
    > > > burning capability or the third party software that came with your
    > computer,
    > > > whichever is more appealing for you. You can also use Windows' own
    > backup
    > > > program, which is very basic, or purchase third party software for more
    > > > convenience and additional features. After you become more familiar and
    > > > experienced, you may want to try imaging software, which makes an exact
    > copy
    > > > of an entire drive but takes a respectable amount of knowledge to use
    > > > correctly.
    > > >
    > > > Start by backing up My Documents. You may also want to backup your
    > e-mail
    > > > address book and messages, and your internet favorites or bookmarks. You
    > may
    > > > not need to backup your music, pictures or videos if you already have
    > copies
    > > > on CDs or DVDs. If you have purchased music or video from the internet,
    > > > you'll want to backup the licenses. If you have XP Pro and you have
    > > > encrypted folders and files with it's built-in encryption, you'll need
    > to
    > > > backup the encryption key.
    > > >
    > > > As you become more sophisticated, you may decide to backup other things,
    > > > like configuration files and other technicalia.
    > > >
    > > > Modem Ani
    > > >
    > > > "WEB86" <WEB86@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > > > news:401B22FE-F7FF-4FB0-88C8-99AE7668B300@microsoft.com...
    > > > > I am a newbie. How & what should I backup? I have a dual format
    > burner,
    > > > but
    > > > > no 2nd hard drive. Thank You, WEB86
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    >
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    In news:65D34A62-F6EC-4928-8D86-663FD30E5ACA@microsoft.com,
    WEB86 <WEB86@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:

    > Ken, thanks for your help. Can you tell me how I access my
    > files &
    > folders to back up?


    You're welcome. Glad to help.

    If all you want to do is write particular files to CD or DVD, you
    can do this easily through your CD-burning software.


    > Also, I have a multi-format CD/DVD burner. How
    > would I back up to that?


    What CD/DVD-burning software do you use?

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup


    > Thanks, WEB86
    > "Ken Blake" wrote:
    >
    >> In news:401B22FE-F7FF-4FB0-88C8-99AE7668B300@microsoft.com,
    >> WEB86 <WEB86@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:
    >>
    >>> I am a newbie. How & what should I backup? I have a dual
    >>> format
    >>> burner, but no 2nd hard drive.
    >>
    >>
    >> First of all, almost everyone should be backing up regularly.
    >> It
    >> is always possible that a hard drive crash, user error, nearby
    >> lightning strike, virus attack, even theft of the computer,
    >> can
    >> cause the loss of everything on your drive. As has often been
    >> said, it's not a matter of whether you will have such a
    >> problem,
    >> but when.
    >>
    >> Essentially you should back up what you can't afford to
    >> lose--what you can't readily recreate. What that is depends on
    >> how you use your computer and what you use it for.
    >>
    >> It takes time and effort to backup, but it also takes time and
    >> effort to recreate lost data. If you back up daily, you should
    >> never have to recreate more than one day's worth of last data.
    >> If
    >> weekly, there's potentially a lot more to recreate. You should
    >> assess how much pain and trouble you would have if you lost x
    >> days of data, and then choose a backup frequency that doesn't
    >> involve more pain and trouble than that you would have if you
    >> had
    >> to recreate what was lost.
    >>
    >> At one extreme is the professional user who would likely go
    >> out
    >> of business if his data was lost. He probably needs to back up
    >> at
    >> least daily. At the other extreme is the kid who doesn't use
    >> his
    >> game except to play games. He probably needs no backup at all,
    >> since worst case he can easily reinstall his games.
    >>
    >> Most of us fall somewhere between those extremes, but nobody
    >> can
    >> tell you where you fall; you need to determine that for
    >> yourself.
    >>
    >> Should you back up Windows? Should you back up your
    >> applications?
    >> Most people will tell you no, since you can always reinstall
    >> these easily from the original media. But I don't think the
    >> answer is so clear-cut. Many people have substantial time and
    >> effort invested in customizing Windows and configuring their
    >> apps
    >> to work the way they want to. Putting all of that back the way
    >> it
    >> was can be a difficult, time-consuming effort. Whether you
    >> should
    >> backup up Windows and apps depends, once again, on you.
    >>
    >> How to backup? What software to use? There are many choices,
    >> including the Windows-supplied backup program. Which choice is
    >> best for you depends at least in part on the answers to some
    >> of
    >> the questions above.
    >>
    >> Finally what backup media should you choose, and how should it
    >> be
    >> stored? There are many choices, including CDs, tape, zip
    >> drives,
    >> and second hard drives.
    >>
    >> I don't recommend backup to a second non-removable hard drive
    >> because it leaves you susceptible to simultaneous loss of the
    >> original and backup to many of the most common dangers: severe
    >> power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, virus attacks, even
    >> theft of the computer.
    >>
    >> In my view, secure backup needs to be on removable media, and
    >> not
    >> kept in the computer. For really secure backup (needed, for
    >> example, if the life of your business depends on your data)
    >> you
    >> should have multiple generations of backup, and at least one
    >> of
    >> those generations should be stored off-site.
    >>
    >> My computer isn't used for business, but my personal backup
    >> scheme uses two identical removable hard drives, which fit
    >> into a
    >> sleeve installed in the computer. I alternate between the two,
    >> and use Drive Image to make a complete copy of the primary
    >> drive.
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    >> Please reply to the newsgroup
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Basically there are 2 types of backups
    1) Copy of individual files or folders:
    You can use XP's built in CD writing capabilities to simply copy files or
    whole directories to CD-R. Keep in mind that XP cannot burn to DVD without
    additional software. To learn how to burn files to CD with XP take this link
    http://www.microsoft.com/WINDOWSXP/expertzone/columns/bridgman/august13.asp
    If you want to burn to DVD then this freeware app will work very nicely for
    that http://www.cdburnerxp.se/

    If you want to compress the data, to save space, before it is burned then
    you can use commercial archiving software. Some apps will enable you to
    write the files directly to CD/DVD and some will involve a 2 step process
    whereby you create the compressed files first and then copy them to disc.

    2) Full System Backup
    Rather than selecting individual files or directories a Full System Backup
    creates an "image" or an exact copy of an entire partition or hard drive and
    saves this in a special file that can be restored later. This involves
    purchasing third party software. Do not let anyone tell you that this can be
    accomplished with XP's built in Backup software. You need third party
    software. Common imaging software includes Ghost, Acronis TrueImage and
    BootIt NG. With imaging software you can easily restore your entire system
    setup in minutes rather than hours.


    There are a few programs that offer the best of both worlds. Backup MyPC
    works well for saving individual files and folders or creating a full system
    backup and will burn directly to CD/DVD.

    --

    Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
    www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


    "WEB86" <WEB86@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:401B22FE-F7FF-4FB0-88C8-99AE7668B300@microsoft.com...
    >I am a newbie. How & what should I backup? I have a dual format burner, but
    > no 2nd hard drive. Thank You, WEB86
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