back-door voice mail number

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

I am looking for the "back-door" voice mail number for 484-239-XXXX

Can anyone help me with this?

Thanks!
54 answers Last reply
More about back door voice mail number
  1. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    I'm not certain what you are asking for, but it may be that if this is your
    number, you only have to input the # key to access your voice mail.


    "Scott" <scott@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:40e327ca$0$23330$61fed72c@news.rcn.com...
    > I am looking for the "back-door" voice mail number for 484-239-XXXX
    >
    > Can anyone help me with this?
    >
    > Thanks!
  2. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 18:29:15 -0500, "dg" <dg@isp.net> wrote:

    >I'm not certain what you are asking for, but it may be that if this is your
    >number, you only have to input the # key to access your voice mail.

    I'm pretty sure the OP is looking for a special number which will get
    you right into the voice mail system without having to, 1) call your
    cell from a landline phone, or 2) dialing *86 or your mobile number
    from your cell. I don't think they exist anymore in most markets.
    They were common in the early days of cellular, as back then you would
    often need to call the back door number to retrieve your messages.

    And I recall GTE Mobilnet used to have phone numbers in major markets
    in advance of full roaming capability. For example, if we each had
    cell phones and were in Florida, and one of us had to travel to NY,
    you couldn't just call the number of the phone you wanted to reach.
    You had to call the special number in New York, key in the cell number
    when prompted, then it would place your call. This, of course, put
    the burden of knowing where the wayward traveler was and paying for
    the long distance call on the calling party.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    The Ghost of General Lee wrote:
    > On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 18:29:15 -0500, "dg" <dg@isp.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I'm not certain what you are asking for, but it may be that if this is your
    >>number, you only have to input the # key to access your voice mail.
    >
    >
    > I'm pretty sure the OP is looking for a special number which will get
    > you right into the voice mail system without having to, 1) call your
    > cell from a landline phone, or 2) dialing *86 or your mobile number
    > from your cell. I don't think they exist anymore in most markets.
    > They were common in the early days of cellular, as back then you would
    > often need to call the back door number to retrieve your messages.
    >
    > And I recall GTE Mobilnet used to have phone numbers in major markets
    > in advance of full roaming capability. For example, if we each had
    > cell phones and were in Florida, and one of us had to travel to NY,
    > you couldn't just call the number of the phone you wanted to reach.
    > You had to call the special number in New York, key in the cell number
    > when prompted, then it would place your call. This, of course, put
    > the burden of knowing where the wayward traveler was and paying for
    > the long distance call on the calling party.
    >
    Correct. My battery was dead today and I wanted to check vmai. I know
    that I can call my own cell number and push # to get my messages, but, I
    thought that the "back-door" allowed me to check messages without
    costing minutes off of my plan.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    OT: Reminds me, is there a number you can call on
    your landline phone that after you hang up will ring
    that phone back? I remember this used to work long
    ago, and was good for testing the phone ringer out.

    Carl

    "The Ghost of General Lee" <ghost@general.lee> wrote in message
    news:5bk6e01m1ro07h7rkvr4mdcmi68qqrugol@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 18:29:15 -0500, "dg" <dg@isp.net> wrote:
    >
    > >I'm not certain what you are asking for, but it may be that if this is
    your
    > >number, you only have to input the # key to access your voice mail.
    >
    > I'm pretty sure the OP is looking for a special number which will get
    > you right into the voice mail system without having to, 1) call your
    > cell from a landline phone, or 2) dialing *86 or your mobile number
    > from your cell. I don't think they exist anymore in most markets.
    > They were common in the early days of cellular, as back then you would
    > often need to call the back door number to retrieve your messages.
    >
    > And I recall GTE Mobilnet used to have phone numbers in major markets
    > in advance of full roaming capability. For example, if we each had
    > cell phones and were in Florida, and one of us had to travel to NY,
    > you couldn't just call the number of the phone you wanted to reach.
    > You had to call the special number in New York, key in the cell number
    > when prompted, then it would place your call. This, of course, put
    > the burden of knowing where the wayward traveler was and paying for
    > the long distance call on the calling party.
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    OT: Reminds me, is there a number you can call on
    your landline phone that after you hang up will ring
    that phone back? I remember this used to work long
    ago, and was good for testing the phone ringer out.

    Carl

    "The Ghost of General Lee" <ghost@general.lee> wrote in message
    news:5bk6e01m1ro07h7rkvr4mdcmi68qqrugol@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 18:29:15 -0500, "dg" <dg@isp.net> wrote:
    >
    > >I'm not certain what you are asking for, but it may be that if this is
    your
    > >number, you only have to input the # key to access your voice mail.
    >
    > I'm pretty sure the OP is looking for a special number which will get
    > you right into the voice mail system without having to, 1) call your
    > cell from a landline phone, or 2) dialing *86 or your mobile number
    > from your cell. I don't think they exist anymore in most markets.
    > They were common in the early days of cellular, as back then you would
    > often need to call the back door number to retrieve your messages.
    >
    > And I recall GTE Mobilnet used to have phone numbers in major markets
    > in advance of full roaming capability. For example, if we each had
    > cell phones and were in Florida, and one of us had to travel to NY,
    > you couldn't just call the number of the phone you wanted to reach.
    > You had to call the special number in New York, key in the cell number
    > when prompted, then it would place your call. This, of course, put
    > the burden of knowing where the wayward traveler was and paying for
    > the long distance call on the calling party.
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    OT: Reminds me, is there a number you can call on
    your landline phone that after you hang up will ring
    that phone back? I remember this used to work long
    ago, and was good for testing the phone ringer out.

    Carl

    "The Ghost of General Lee" <ghost@general.lee> wrote in message
    news:5bk6e01m1ro07h7rkvr4mdcmi68qqrugol@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 18:29:15 -0500, "dg" <dg@isp.net> wrote:
    >
    > >I'm not certain what you are asking for, but it may be that if this is
    your
    > >number, you only have to input the # key to access your voice mail.
    >
    > I'm pretty sure the OP is looking for a special number which will get
    > you right into the voice mail system without having to, 1) call your
    > cell from a landline phone, or 2) dialing *86 or your mobile number
    > from your cell. I don't think they exist anymore in most markets.
    > They were common in the early days of cellular, as back then you would
    > often need to call the back door number to retrieve your messages.
    >
    > And I recall GTE Mobilnet used to have phone numbers in major markets
    > in advance of full roaming capability. For example, if we each had
    > cell phones and were in Florida, and one of us had to travel to NY,
    > you couldn't just call the number of the phone you wanted to reach.
    > You had to call the special number in New York, key in the cell number
    > when prompted, then it would place your call. This, of course, put
    > the burden of knowing where the wayward traveler was and paying for
    > the long distance call on the calling party.
    >
  7. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Hi Carl: I can tell you about Verizon New Jersey, it's involved,
    where are you ?

    QE
    ================

    On Thu, 01 Jul 2004 00:48:05 GMT, "Carl S. Moore"
    <csmNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote:

    |OT: Reminds me, is there a number you can call on
    |your landline phone that after you hang up will ring
    |that phone back? I remember this used to work long
    |ago, and was good for testing the phone ringer out.
    |
    |Carl
    |
    |"The Ghost of General Lee" <ghost@general.lee> wrote in message
    |news:5bk6e01m1ro07h7rkvr4mdcmi68qqrugol@4ax.com...
    |> On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 18:29:15 -0500, "dg" <dg@isp.net> wrote:
    |>
    |> >I'm not certain what you are asking for, but it may be that if
    this is
    |your
    |> >number, you only have to input the # key to access your voice
    mail.
    |>
    |> I'm pretty sure the OP is looking for a special number which will
    get
    |> you right into the voice mail system without having to, 1) call
    your
    |> cell from a landline phone, or 2) dialing *86 or your mobile number
    |> from your cell. I don't think they exist anymore in most markets.
    |> They were common in the early days of cellular, as back then you
    would
    |> often need to call the back door number to retrieve your messages.
    |>
    |> And I recall GTE Mobilnet used to have phone numbers in major
    markets
    |> in advance of full roaming capability. For example, if we each had
    |> cell phones and were in Florida, and one of us had to travel to NY,
    |> you couldn't just call the number of the phone you wanted to reach.
    |> You had to call the special number in New York, key in the cell
    number
    |> when prompted, then it would place your call. This, of course, put
    |> the burden of knowing where the wayward traveler was and paying for
    |> the long distance call on the calling party.
    |>
    |
  8. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Northeast, so should be similar.


    "QuienEs" <QuienEsREMOVETHISandthis@optonline.net> wrote in message
    news:rqp6e052lv65otlclrq4l6etefnnlctmj5@4ax.com...
    > Hi Carl: I can tell you about Verizon New Jersey, it's involved,
    > where are you ?
    >
    > QE
  9. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Hadn't tried this for a few years and it doesn't work anymore.

    FWIW, you would dial 550, 551 or 552 followed by the last 4 digits
    of your fone number. Which of the 3 would work varied by excahnge and
    you would have to experiment. Then you would get a tone, then jiggle
    the switch hook sort-of at a 1/2 or 1/3 second rate, get a different
    tone, then hang up. It would ring you back.

    When I just tried all 3 I got either "I'm sorry..." or a reorder.

    It's worth your calling VZ help peeps, I think I read about a service
    you can get, for calling your extentions. I used to use the above to
    test bells on new fones. Have been calling home from my cell to do
    that lately.

    Also try a Google on Usenet and the Web, the fone freakz probably
    have helpful posts.

    QE
    =================


    On Thu, 01 Jul 2004 01:43:23 GMT, "Carl S. Moore"
    <csmNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote:

    |Northeast, so should be similar.
    |
    |
    |"QuienEs" <QuienEsREMOVETHISandthis@optonline.net> wrote in message
    |news:rqp6e052lv65otlclrq4l6etefnnlctmj5@4ax.com...
    |> Hi Carl: I can tell you about Verizon New Jersey, it's involved,
    |> where are you ?
    |>
    |> QE
    |
  10. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    southern nj and philly still works with 550 and the last 4 digits on your
    landline. call then get the tone, flash, then it rings it back.... that and
    958 pressed will get you the number you are dialing from........ that is
    from verizon not VZW...

    for the other poster there is a list of backdoors you might have to google
    it i only have it for south jersey.

    brian s.

    "QuienEs" <QuienEsREMOVETHIS@ANDTHISoptonline.net> wrote in message
    news:m7r6e0l4o0me59a9pq2lrjkjq6uhk5s0ih@4ax.com...
    > Hadn't tried this for a few years and it doesn't work anymore.
    >
    > FWIW, you would dial 550, 551 or 552 followed by the last 4 digits
    > of your fone number. Which of the 3 would work varied by excahnge and
    > you would have to experiment. Then you would get a tone, then jiggle
    > the switch hook sort-of at a 1/2 or 1/3 second rate, get a different
    > tone, then hang up. It would ring you back.
    >
    > When I just tried all 3 I got either "I'm sorry..." or a reorder.
    >
    > It's worth your calling VZ help peeps, I think I read about a service
    > you can get, for calling your extentions. I used to use the above to
    > test bells on new fones. Have been calling home from my cell to do
    > that lately.
    >
    > Also try a Google on Usenet and the Web, the fone freakz probably
    > have helpful posts.
    >
    > QE
    > =================
    >
    >
    >
    > On Thu, 01 Jul 2004 01:43:23 GMT, "Carl S. Moore"
    > <csmNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote:
    >
    > |Northeast, so should be similar.
    > |
    > |
    > |"QuienEs" <QuienEsREMOVETHISandthis@optonline.net> wrote in message
    > |news:rqp6e052lv65otlclrq4l6etefnnlctmj5@4ax.com...
    > |> Hi Carl: I can tell you about Verizon New Jersey, it's involved,
    > |> where are you ?
    > |>
    > |> QE
    > |
    >
  11. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    In article <5bk6e01m1ro07h7rkvr4mdcmi68qqrugol@4ax.com>,
    The Ghost of General Lee <ghost@general.lee> wrote:
    >On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 18:29:15 -0500, "dg" <dg@isp.net> wrote:
    >
    >>I'm not certain what you are asking for, but it may be that if this is your
    >>number, you only have to input the # key to access your voice mail.
    >
    >I'm pretty sure the OP is looking for a special number which will get
    >you right into the voice mail system without having to, 1) call your
    >cell from a landline phone, or 2) dialing *86 or your mobile number
    >from your cell. I don't think they exist anymore in most markets.
    >They were common in the early days of cellular, as back then you would
    >often need to call the back door number to retrieve your messages.
    >
    >And I recall GTE Mobilnet used to have phone numbers in major markets
    >in advance of full roaming capability. For example, if we each had
    >cell phones and were in Florida, and one of us had to travel to NY,
    >you couldn't just call the number of the phone you wanted to reach.
    >You had to call the special number in New York, key in the cell number
    >when prompted, then it would place your call. This, of course, put
    >the burden of knowing where the wayward traveler was and paying for
    >the long distance call on the calling party.

    There are two different things mentioned here. The OP is talking about
    a direct number for the Voice Mail system, where you call the number,
    and enter the cell#, to leave or listen to messages for that number's
    voice mail. These numbers seem to be disappearing, but they still exist
    in some areas (e.g, San Francisco Bay area). They are nice when you want
    to just leave a message for someone without ringing their phone. Also,
    if you want to check your VM from a landline, you don't have to wait for
    your phone to ring and finally go to VM. And using "outcall" from, say
    a business PBX, you can be paged that you have a message on that system
    (although VZW now has a service which does this in a cleaner way.)

    The other function is the "roamer access port". Before roaming was
    automatic, you would direct people to call the "roamer access" number
    for the system you would be visiting. They call that number, get a
    second dial tone, and dial the 10-digit number of the phone roaming
    on that system. If your phone was registered on that system, it would
    ring. This was also used to bypass long-distance charges, where your
    caller would have to pay long-distance to call your cell's number, and
    you would have to pay long-distance (plus the airtime) to get the call,
    when the other person was on the next block.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    On 1 Jul 2004 06:25:28 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:

    >There are two different things mentioned here. The OP is talking about
    >a direct number for the Voice Mail system, where you call the number,
    >and enter the cell#, to leave or listen to messages for that number's
    >voice mail. These numbers seem to be disappearing, but they still exist
    >in some areas (e.g, San Francisco Bay area). They are nice when you want
    >to just leave a message for someone without ringing their phone. Also,
    >if you want to check your VM from a landline, you don't have to wait for
    >your phone to ring and finally go to VM. And using "outcall" from, say
    >a business PBX, you can be paged that you have a message on that system
    >(although VZW now has a service which does this in a cleaner way.)
    >
    >The other function is the "roamer access port". Before roaming was
    >automatic, you would direct people to call the "roamer access" number
    >for the system you would be visiting. They call that number, get a
    >second dial tone, and dial the 10-digit number of the phone roaming
    >on that system. If your phone was registered on that system, it would
    >ring. This was also used to bypass long-distance charges, where your
    >caller would have to pay long-distance to call your cell's number, and
    >you would have to pay long-distance (plus the airtime) to get the call,
    >when the other person was on the next block.

    Aren't those the exact same two things I described?
  13. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    In article <m7r6e0l4o0me59a9pq2lrjkjq6uhk5s0ih@4ax.com>,
    QuienEs <QuienEsREMOVETHIS@ANDTHISoptonline.net> wrote:
    >Hadn't tried this for a few years and it doesn't work anymore.
    >
    >FWIW, you would dial 550, 551 or 552 followed by the last 4 digits
    >of your fone number. Which of the 3 would work varied by excahnge and
    >you would have to experiment. Then you would get a tone, then jiggle
    >the switch hook sort-of at a 1/2 or 1/3 second rate, get a different
    >tone, then hang up. It would ring you back.

    I think you are talking about landline calls here, not cellular.
    That would be Verizon Communications, not Verizon Wireless.
    Two different (but related) companies.
  14. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Scott wrote:
    > I am looking for the "back-door" voice mail number for 484-239-XXXX
    >
    > Can anyone help me with this?
    >
    > Thanks!

    Try one of these:

    Allentown PA (484) 225-8686
    West Chester PA (484) 678-8686

    Found them here:

    http://www.mountainwireless.com/vzw_vm.htm
  15. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Ralph Alvy wrote:
    >
    >
    > Try one of these:
    >
    > Allentown PA (484) 225-8686
    > West Chester PA (484) 678-8686
    >
    > Found them here:
    >
    > http://www.mountainwireless.com/vzw_vm.htm

    AWESOME! Thanks Ralph, number 1 did the trick!

    Thanks, Scott
  16. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    "Scott" <scott@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:40e36be4$0$23309$61fed72c@news.rcn.com...
    > The Ghost of General Lee wrote:
    > > On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 18:29:15 -0500, "dg" <dg@isp.net> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>I'm not certain what you are asking for, but it may be that if this is
    your
    > >>number, you only have to input the # key to access your voice mail.
    > >
    > >
    > > I'm pretty sure the OP is looking for a special number which will get
    > > you right into the voice mail system without having to, 1) call your
    > > cell from a landline phone, or 2) dialing *86 or your mobile number
    > > from your cell. I don't think they exist anymore in most markets.
    > > They were common in the early days of cellular, as back then you would
    > > often need to call the back door number to retrieve your messages.
    > >
    > > And I recall GTE Mobilnet used to have phone numbers in major markets
    > > in advance of full roaming capability. For example, if we each had
    > > cell phones and were in Florida, and one of us had to travel to NY,
    > > you couldn't just call the number of the phone you wanted to reach.
    > > You had to call the special number in New York, key in the cell number
    > > when prompted, then it would place your call. This, of course, put
    > > the burden of knowing where the wayward traveler was and paying for
    > > the long distance call on the calling party.
    > >
    > Correct. My battery was dead today and I wanted to check vmai. I know
    > that I can call my own cell number and push # to get my messages, but, I
    > thought that the "back-door" allowed me to check messages without
    > costing minutes off of my plan.

    As an ATTWS customer, I find it hard to believe that VZW could get away with
    charging airtime when a subscriber called voicemail from a landline.

    No such charge with ATTWS--you can make unlimited calls to your wireless
    number's voicemail without charge. Only time you pay is when you call in
    from your wireless phone--and even then you get free nights and weekends on
    many plans.

    Free incoming text messages, too. Not the 2-cents per inbound that VZW
    charges.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    "Jeremy" <jeremy@nospam.thanks.com> wrote in message
    news:%2YEc.3803$yy1.2995@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    >
    >
    > As an ATTWS customer, I find it hard to believe that VZW could get away
    with
    > charging airtime when a subscriber called voicemail from a landline.
    >
    > No such charge with ATTWS--you can make unlimited calls to your wireless
    > number's voicemail without charge. Only time you pay is when you call in
    > from your wireless phone--and even then you get free nights and weekends
    on
    > many plans.
    >
    > Free incoming text messages, too. Not the 2-cents per inbound that VZW
    > charges.
    >

    That's the same with VerizonWireless...no charge if you call from a landline
    to retrieve your voicemail. They do charge for text messages, though. :-)

    Harold
  18. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    "Harold Sherrill" <hlsherrill@NOSPAMhotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:_wYEc.5207$Kk1.1720@newssvr23.news.prodigy.com...
    > "Jeremy" <jeremy@nospam.thanks.com> wrote in message
    > news:%2YEc.3803$yy1.2995@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > >
    > >
    > > As an ATTWS customer, I find it hard to believe that VZW could get away
    > with
    > > charging airtime when a subscriber called voicemail from a landline.
    > >
    > > No such charge with ATTWS--you can make unlimited calls to your wireless
    > > number's voicemail without charge. Only time you pay is when you call
    in
    > > from your wireless phone--and even then you get free nights and weekends
    > on
    > > many plans.
    > >
    > > Free incoming text messages, too. Not the 2-cents per inbound that VZW
    > > charges.
    > >
    >
    > That's the same with VerizonWireless...no charge if you call from a
    landline
    > to retrieve your voicemail. They do charge for text messages, though.
    :-)
    >
    > Harold

    My daughter signed up for a Verizon prepaid service, about a year ago, and
    learned that she was charged airtime whenever she retrieved her messages,
    whether from her wireless phone or from a landline.

    She promptly returned her phone, got clipped for "account setup fee" and
    went with the GoPhone from ATTWS.
  19. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    On Thu, 01 Jul 2004 19:08:10 GMT, "Jeremy" <jeremy@nospam.thanks.com>
    wrote:

    >> That's the same with VerizonWireless...no charge if you call from a
    >landline
    >> to retrieve your voicemail. They do charge for text messages, though.
    >:-)
    >>
    >> Harold
    >
    >My daughter signed up for a Verizon prepaid service, about a year ago, and
    >learned that she was charged airtime whenever she retrieved her messages,
    >whether from her wireless phone or from a landline.

    That is the policy for Free-Up accounts. The account rep should have
    explained it to you better when you signed up for service. Regular
    accounts are not charged when retrieving VM from a landline.

    Question to anyone who knows: Does calling the backdoor numbers save
    you the charge on FreeUp accounts? My son lost my FU phone (I think
    on purpose) so I can't test it to know. I'd like to know before
    getting another.
  20. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Scott wrote:
    > Ralph Alvy wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> Try one of these:
    >>
    >> Allentown PA (484) 225-8686
    >> West Chester PA (484) 678-8686
    >>
    >> Found them here:
    >>
    >> http://www.mountainwireless.com/vzw_vm.htm
    >
    >
    > AWESOME! Thanks Ralph, number 1 did the trick!
    >
    > Thanks, Scott
    No problem, Scott. Those backdoor numbers are update frequently on that
    list.
  21. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    The Ghost of General Lee wrote:

    > On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 18:29:15 -0500, "dg" <dg@isp.net> wrote:
    > I'm pretty sure the OP is looking for a special number which will get
    > you right into the voice mail system without having to, 1) call your
    > cell from a landline phone, or 2) dialing *86 or your mobile number
    > from your cell. I don't think they exist anymore in most markets.

    Here's the continuously updated list of Verizon Wireless backdoor numbers:

    http://www.mountainwireless.com/vzw_vm.htm
  22. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    On Fri, 02 Jul 2004 00:25:24 GMT, Ralph Alvy <ralvy@warpmail.net>
    wrote:

    >The Ghost of General Lee wrote:
    >
    >> On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 18:29:15 -0500, "dg" <dg@isp.net> wrote:
    >> I'm pretty sure the OP is looking for a special number which will get
    >> you right into the voice mail system without having to, 1) call your
    >> cell from a landline phone, or 2) dialing *86 or your mobile number
    >> from your cell. I don't think they exist anymore in most markets.
    >
    >Here's the continuously updated list of Verizon Wireless backdoor numbers:
    >
    >http://www.mountainwireless.com/vzw_vm.htm

    Columbia seems to be the only one left in SC.
  23. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Thanks... I'll try it.

    Sorry for some of the confusion from Verizon and VZW, that's
    why I posted the OT (off topic), as I figured I'd get some
    info from the forum here easiest.

    Carl

    "QuienEs" <QuienEsREMOVETHIS@ANDTHISoptonline.net> wrote in message
    news:m7r6e0l4o0me59a9pq2lrjkjq6uhk5s0ih@4ax.com...
    > Hadn't tried this for a few years and it doesn't work anymore.
    >
    > FWIW, you would dial 550, 551 or 552 followed by the last 4 digits
    > of your fone number. Which of the 3 would work varied by excahnge and
    > you would have to experiment. Then you would get a tone, then jiggle
    > the switch hook sort-of at a 1/2 or 1/3 second rate, get a different
    > tone, then hang up. It would ring you back.
    >
    > When I just tried all 3 I got either "I'm sorry..." or a reorder.
    >
    > It's worth your calling VZ help peeps, I think I read about a service
    > you can get, for calling your extentions. I used to use the above to
    > test bells on new fones. Have been calling home from my cell to do
    > that lately.
    >
    > Also try a Google on Usenet and the Web, the fone freakz probably
    > have helpful posts.
    >
    > QE
    > =================
  24. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    I tried the Las Vegas number and it was someones home phone....

    On Thu, 01 Jul 2004 23:16:45 -0400, The Ghost of General Lee
    <ghost@general.lee> wrote:

    >On Fri, 02 Jul 2004 00:25:24 GMT, Ralph Alvy <ralvy@warpmail.net>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>The Ghost of General Lee wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 18:29:15 -0500, "dg" <dg@isp.net> wrote:
    >>> I'm pretty sure the OP is looking for a special number which will get
    >>> you right into the voice mail system without having to, 1) call your
    >>> cell from a landline phone, or 2) dialing *86 or your mobile number
    >>> from your cell. I don't think they exist anymore in most markets.
    >>
    >>Here's the continuously updated list of Verizon Wireless backdoor numbers:
    >>
    >>http://www.mountainwireless.com/vzw_vm.htm
    >
    >Columbia seems to be the only one left in SC.
  25. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 19:58:51 -0400, The Ghost of General Lee
    <ghost@general.lee> chose to add this to the great equation of life, the
    universe, and everything:

    >And I recall GTE Mobilnet used to have phone numbers in major markets
    >in advance of full roaming capability. For example, if we each had
    >cell phones and were in Florida, and one of us had to travel to NY,
    >you couldn't just call the number of the phone you wanted to reach.
    >You had to call the special number in New York, key in the cell number
    >when prompted, then it would place your call. This, of course, put
    >the burden of knowing where the wayward traveler was and paying for
    >the long distance call on the calling party.

    I thought that the point of that was so that a person local to where you
    were visiting could call a local number to get you instead of long distance
    back to your home market. This also then served to save you the long
    distance on your cell bill from home back to wherever you were. Come to
    think of it, even if someone back home wanted to call you, it was much
    cheaper for them to use their landline long distance to call the local
    number for where you were than for you to pay it on your cell service
    (IIRC, ld on my original plan was $.25/min.).

    --
    David Streeter, "an internet god" -- Dave Barry
    http://home.att.net/~dwstreeter
    Remove the naughty bit from my address to reply
    Expect a train on ANY track at ANY time.
    "There's no such thing as a non-sexual comment on Usenet. :o)"
    - James Archer in alt.geek
  26. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    On Sat, 03 Jul 2004 04:32:20 GMT, David S
    <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote:

    >I thought that the point of that was so that a person local to where you
    >were visiting could call a local number to get you instead of long distance
    >back to your home market.

    As the GTE rep explained it to me, it was designed to provide
    "roaming" access, but in practice, it served either function equally
    well. I recall receiving a list of numbers across the country that we
    kept at the office in case we needed to reach the boss while he was on
    one of his ski trips to Colorado or North Carolina. This was around
    1988.

    I think by the time I got my own cell service in 1995, calling a phone
    out of it's home market worked much more like it does now, just much
    more expensive.
  27. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Does anyone know the # for Winston-Salem, NC?

    Thanks.

    "Scott" <scott@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:40e327ca$0$23330$61fed72c@news.rcn.com...
    > I am looking for the "back-door" voice mail number for 484-239-XXXX
    >
    > Can anyone help me with this?
    >
    > Thanks!
  28. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Janie Collins wrote:

    > Does anyone know the # for Winston-Salem, NC?
    >
    > Thanks.

    I looked in http://www.mountainwireless.com/vzw_vm.htm and found these for
    NC:

    Asheville NC (828) 779-7600
    Asheville NC (828) 774-0038
    Goldsboro NC (919) 222-9951
    Greenville NC (252) 717-6245
    Greenville NC (252) 341-9952
    Raleigh NC (919) 740-6245
    Smithfield NC (919) 915-9910
  29. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Ralph,

    Thanks so much! I actually looked on that site and none of the #s listed is
    my area code, so (having tried) I get the message that "the number you
    entered (my cell #) is not a valid mailbox".

    Janie

    "Ralph Alvy" <ralvy@warpmail.net> wrote in message
    news:CQEFc.5012$6e7.2622@nwrddc03.gnilink.net...
    > Janie Collins wrote:
    >
    > > Does anyone know the # for Winston-Salem, NC?
    > >
    > > Thanks.
    >
    > I looked in http://www.mountainwireless.com/vzw_vm.htm and found these for
    > NC:
    >
    > Asheville NC (828) 779-7600
    > Asheville NC (828) 774-0038
    > Goldsboro NC (919) 222-9951
    > Greenville NC (252) 717-6245
    > Greenville NC (252) 341-9952
    > Raleigh NC (919) 740-6245
    > Smithfield NC (919) 915-9910
  30. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Janie Collins wrote:

    > Ralph,
    >
    > Thanks so much! I actually looked on that site and none of the #s listed
    > is my area code, so (having tried) I get the message that "the number you
    > entered (my cell #) is not a valid mailbox".

    Ah. Well, there might not be such a number for you. They're apparently
    pulling them off the market gradually.
  31. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    On Thu, 01 Jul 2004 03:03:27 -0400, The Ghost of General Lee
    <ghost@general.lee> chose to add this to the great equation of life, the
    universe, and everything:

    >On 1 Jul 2004 06:25:28 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
    >
    >>There are two different things mentioned here. The OP is talking about
    >>a direct number for the Voice Mail system, where you call the number,
    >>and enter the cell#, to leave or listen to messages for that number's
    >>voice mail. These numbers seem to be disappearing, but they still exist
    >>in some areas (e.g, San Francisco Bay area). They are nice when you want
    >>to just leave a message for someone without ringing their phone. Also,
    >>if you want to check your VM from a landline, you don't have to wait for
    >>your phone to ring and finally go to VM. And using "outcall" from, say
    >>a business PBX, you can be paged that you have a message on that system
    >>(although VZW now has a service which does this in a cleaner way.)
    >>
    >>The other function is the "roamer access port". Before roaming was
    >>automatic, you would direct people to call the "roamer access" number
    >>for the system you would be visiting. They call that number, get a
    >>second dial tone, and dial the 10-digit number of the phone roaming
    >>on that system. If your phone was registered on that system, it would
    >>ring. This was also used to bypass long-distance charges, where your
    >>caller would have to pay long-distance to call your cell's number, and
    >>you would have to pay long-distance (plus the airtime) to get the call,
    >>when the other person was on the next block.
    >
    >Aren't those the exact same two things I described?

    Yes, but he explained it better for those who didn't already know it.

    (He also explained the second part better than I did.)

    --
    David Streeter, "an internet god" -- Dave Barry
    http://home.att.net/~dwstreeter
    Remove the naughty bit from my address to reply
    Expect a train on ANY track at ANY time.
    "I avoid church religiously." - Lt. Col. Henry Blake
  32. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    CharlesH wrote:
    > And using "outcall" from, say
    > a business PBX, you can be paged that you have a message on that system
    > (although VZW now has a service which does this in a cleaner way.)

    What is this service that VZW offers? Or are you just talking about its
    voicemail?
  33. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Ralph Alvy <ralvy@warpmail.net> wrote:
    > CharlesH wrote:
    >> And using "outcall" from, say
    >> a business PBX, you can be paged that you have a message on that system
    >> (although VZW now has a service which does this in a cleaner way.)
    >
    > What is this service that VZW offers? Or are you just talking about its
    > voicemail?

    It's called Office Message Alert. Your office PBX/phone system dials the
    tollfree OMA number and sends your 10-digit phone number along with a
    10-digit callback number (or someone can call that number manually and
    key in the information). You then receive the info as a numeric page on
    your phone. It's a free service but you must ask for it to be turned on.

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, http://JustThe.net/
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) / sjsobol@JustThe.net
    PGP Key available from your friendly local key server (0xE3AE35ED)
    Apple Valley, California Nothing scares me anymore. I have three kids.
  34. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Steven J Sobol wrote:
    > It's called Office Message Alert. Your office PBX/phone system dials the
    > tollfree OMA number and sends your 10-digit phone number along with a
    > 10-digit callback number (or someone can call that number manually and
    > key in the information). You then receive the info as a numeric page on
    > your phone. It's a free service but you must ask for it to be turned on.

    Interesting. I can use that. I've always relied on backdoor numbers for
    that. Thanks.
  35. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Ralph Alvy <ralvy@warpmail.net> wrote:
    > Steven J Sobol wrote:
    >> It's called Office Message Alert. Your office PBX/phone system dials the
    >> tollfree OMA number and sends your 10-digit phone number along with a
    >> 10-digit callback number (or someone can call that number manually and
    >> key in the information). You then receive the info as a numeric page on
    >> your phone. It's a free service but you must ask for it to be turned on.
    >
    > Interesting. I can use that. I've always relied on backdoor numbers for
    > that. Thanks.

    Oh. One other thing. I actually didn't quite describe the service
    correctly - it's sent as a TEXT MESSAGE and is subject to the customary
    text message charges. Messages sent via OMA are deducted from your SMS
    bucket if you pay for one of the text messaging packages and cost 2 cents
    per message to receive if you don't have a package or if you go over your
    monthly allotment. There is no monthly fee for OMA itself, though.

    Numeric pages left by callers leaving callback numbers on your voicemail
    are not considered text messages and do not have those costs associated with
    them.

    Sorry about that.

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, http://JustThe.net/
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) / sjsobol@JustThe.net
    PGP Key available from your friendly local key server (0xE3AE35ED)
    Apple Valley, California Nothing scares me anymore. I have three kids.
  36. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Steven J Sobol wrote:

    > Ralph Alvy <ralvy@warpmail.net> wrote:
    >> Steven J Sobol wrote:
    >>> It's called Office Message Alert. Your office PBX/phone system dials the
    >>> tollfree OMA number and sends your 10-digit phone number along with a
    >>> 10-digit callback number (or someone can call that number manually and
    >>> key in the information). You then receive the info as a numeric page on
    >>> your phone. It's a free service but you must ask for it to be turned on.
    >>
    >> Interesting. I can use that. I've always relied on backdoor numbers for
    >> that. Thanks.
    >
    > Oh. One other thing. I actually didn't quite describe the service
    > correctly - it's sent as a TEXT MESSAGE and is subject to the customary
    > text message charges. Messages sent via OMA are deducted from your SMS
    > bucket if you pay for one of the text messaging packages and cost 2 cents
    > per message to receive if you don't have a package or if you go over your
    > monthly allotment. There is no monthly fee for OMA itself, though.
    >
    > Numeric pages left by callers leaving callback numbers on your voicemail
    > are not considered text messages and do not have those costs associated
    > with them.
    >
    > Sorry about that.

    Thanks for the clarification. Still interested. I'll call Verizon about
    this.
  37. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    On Sun, 04 Jul 2004 10:53:58 -0500, Steven J Sobol
    <sjsobol@JustThe.net> wrote:

    >Numeric pages left by callers leaving callback numbers on your voicemail
    >are not considered text messages and do not have those costs associated with
    >them.

    I did not know that. Thank you for adding to my knowledge base.:)
  38. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    On Mon, 05 Jul 2004 04:03:48 GMT, David S
    <dwstreeter@spamisnaughty.att.net> wrote:

    >>I think by the time I got my own cell service in 1995, calling a phone
    >>out of it's home market worked much more like it does now, just much
    >>more expensive.
    >
    >I got my first in January 1997. They gave a booklet of local access numbers
    >for other cities. If I registered with the local system daily, a call
    >direct-dialed to my number would find me and I would be charged ld from
    >home to where I was. That was on an $11.75/month, no minutes plan, minutes
    >were .27 peak, .12 off-peak, plus .02/min. "network interconnection fee."
    >They also gave me a booklet that told me how to dial my calls when I was in
    >other cities (7, 10, 11 or ??? digits, etc...).

    I don't remember how people could reach me, I was always more
    concerned with getting out. I recall the infamous "per day" roaming
    charges. If you made a roaming call on some systems, even just one 5
    second call, you got hit with a daily roaming fee of a few bucks, on
    top of the per minute roaming charge. I do recall something about
    having to call a special number (don't recall if it was different in
    each market) in order to register with a non-home system. I presume
    it was so I could be found by a caller.
  39. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    "Ralph Alvy" <ralvy@warpmail.net> wrote in message
    news:CQEFc.5012$6e7.2622@nwrddc03.gnilink.net...

    > I looked in http://www.mountainwireless.com/vzw_vm.htm and found these for
    > NC:
    >
    > Asheville NC (828) 779-7600
    > Asheville NC (828) 774-0038
    > Goldsboro NC (919) 222-9951
    > Greenville NC (252) 717-6245
    > Greenville NC (252) 341-9952
    > Raleigh NC (919) 740-6245
    > Smithfield NC (919) 915-9910


    Most of those are US Cellular Numbers, look beside the number on that
    mountain wireless list for the provider. All the numbers listed are not VZW
    numbers.
  40. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    The Ghost of General Lee <ghost@general.lee> wrote:
    > On Sun, 04 Jul 2004 10:53:58 -0500, Steven J Sobol
    > <sjsobol@JustThe.net> wrote:
    >
    >>Numeric pages left by callers leaving callback numbers on your voicemail
    >>are not considered text messages and do not have those costs associated with
    >>them.
    >
    > I did not know that. Thank you for adding to my knowledge base.:)

    You may want to verify that with VZW, but I never got charged for people
    leaving callback numbers even when I had text messaging turned off...

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, http://JustThe.net/
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) / sjsobol@JustThe.net
    PGP Key available from your friendly local key server (0xE3AE35ED)
    Apple Valley, California Nothing scares me anymore. I have three kids.
  41. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    On Mon, 05 Jul 2004 12:26:12 -0500, Steven J Sobol
    <sjsobol@JustThe.net> wrote:

    >The Ghost of General Lee <ghost@general.lee> wrote:
    >> On Sun, 04 Jul 2004 10:53:58 -0500, Steven J Sobol
    >> <sjsobol@JustThe.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Numeric pages left by callers leaving callback numbers on your voicemail
    >>>are not considered text messages and do not have those costs associated with
    >>>them.
    >>
    >> I did not know that. Thank you for adding to my knowledge base.:)
    >
    >You may want to verify that with VZW, but I never got charged for people
    >leaving callback numbers even when I had text messaging turned off...

    I will. I never thought to ask. I just presumed it was like that.
    Since I normally get 15-20 incoming SMS a month, I wouldn't have
    noticed a couple extra cents.
  42. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Scott James wrote:

    > "Ralph Alvy" <ralvy@warpmail.net> wrote in message
    > news:CQEFc.5012$6e7.2622@nwrddc03.gnilink.net...
    >
    >> I looked in http://www.mountainwireless.com/vzw_vm.htm and found these
    >> for NC:
    >>
    >> Asheville NC (828) 779-7600
    >> Asheville NC (828) 774-0038
    >> Goldsboro NC (919) 222-9951
    >> Greenville NC (252) 717-6245
    >> Greenville NC (252) 341-9952
    >> Raleigh NC (919) 740-6245
    >> Smithfield NC (919) 915-9910
    >
    >
    > Most of those are US Cellular Numbers, look beside the number on that
    > mountain wireless list for the provider. All the numbers listed are not
    > VZW numbers.

    I see. That list used to be just VZW backdoor numbers. When I saw "US
    Cellular" next to those I listed, I just assumed that US Cellular was a
    reseller of VZW numbers, so deleted that reference when I pasted it to my
    reply. But now that I look further down the list, I see some Cingular
    numbers too - clearly not a VZW reseller.
  43. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Ralph Alvy <ralvy@warpmail.net> wrote:

    > I see. That list used to be just VZW backdoor numbers. When I saw "US
    > Cellular" next to those I listed, I just assumed that US Cellular was a
    > reseller of VZW numbers, so deleted that reference when I pasted it to my
    > reply. But now that I look further down the list, I see some Cingular
    > numbers too - clearly not a VZW reseller.

    US Cellular maintains their own networks everywhere, as far as I know.
    They are a VZW roaming partner but don't resell VZW...

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, http://JustThe.net/
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) / sjsobol@JustThe.net
    PGP Key available from your friendly local key server (0xE3AE35ED)
    Apple Valley, California Nothing scares me anymore. I have three kids.
  44. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    On Mon, 05 Jul 2004 07:32:55 -0400, The Ghost of General Lee
    <ghost@general.lee> chose to add this to the great equation of life, the
    universe, and everything:

    >I don't remember how people could reach me, I was always more
    >concerned with getting out. I recall the infamous "per day" roaming
    >charges. If you made a roaming call on some systems, even just one 5
    >second call, you got hit with a daily roaming fee of a few bucks, on
    >top of the per minute roaming charge. I do recall something about

    I didn't have one that early, but I remember a friend who worried about
    that all the time (he got his phone when he was away at school, so here at
    home was roaming).

    No, come to think of it, I had to switch my first phone from B to A on a
    trip to St. Louis so I would still be on Ameritech and not get a roaming
    charge.

    >having to call a special number (don't recall if it was different in
    >each market) in order to register with a non-home system. I presume
    >it was so I could be found by a caller.

    I had to do that on my trip, every couple hours on the road and daily while
    there. I don't remember what it was, but it's the same code people in this
    group occasionally spit out as a way of reminding the local system that
    your phone is there and on (which is always followed by other people
    pointing out that it works just as well to call #MIN, #BAL, *611, etc.,
    etc.).

    --
    David Streeter, "an internet god" -- Dave Barry
    http://home.att.net/~dwstreeter
    Remove the naughty bit from my address to reply
    Expect a train on ANY track at ANY time.
    "Democracy is the art of running the circus from the monkey cage."
    - H. L. Mencken
  45. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Steven J Sobol wrote:

    > It's called Office Message Alert. Your office PBX/phone system dials the
    > tollfree OMA number and sends your 10-digit phone number along with a
    > 10-digit callback number (or someone can call that number manually and
    > key in the information). You then receive the info as a numeric page on
    > your phone. It's a free service but you must ask for it to be turned on.

    Just found out that this service requires I have at least 5 business lines
    with Verizon. I only have 3 with them.
  46. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Any ideas about where I can find such a number for the WISCONSIN market
    (Milwuakee?)

    Thanks in advance.

    Stan

    > Here's the continuously updated list of Verizon Wireless backdoor numbers:
    >
    > http://www.mountainwireless.com/vzw_vm.htm
  47. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    What do these numbers do for me?
  48. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Steve B wrote:
    > What do these numbers do for me?

    Well, not sure how many are left but, basically, they give
    you a local *landline* access to your voice mail.

    Maybe not so relevant anymore but suppose you have
    a local digital choice plan on the west coast and want
    to check your voice mail from a major city on the east
    coast. Dial the local "back door" number from a landline
    and you have toll/roam free access to your voice mail.
    I think it used to be that it didn't deduct from your minute
    allotment either.

    This is a little neater although a bit more involved and
    somewhat commercial application (probably not what
    VZW intended). Get an answering machine that will
    call forward with an editable string. Someone calls
    your answering machine, answering machine grabs
    the callerID, calls the back door, leaves you a voice
    mail with the original caller's callerID for the call back
    number... you get a voice mail indication with the
    call back number. You don't even need to use your
    minutes if you use a landline to call back from -- free
    pager service.

    With America's Choice and other inexpensive "no roaming"
    options the back door numbers are not such a big issue
    anymore.

    -Quick
  49. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Stanley Naimon wrote:

    > Any ideas about where I can find such a number for the WISCONSIN
    > market (Milwuakee?)
    >
    > Thanks in advance.
    >
    > Stan
    >
    >> Here's the continuously updated list of Verizon Wireless backdoor
    >> numbers:
    >>
    >> http://www.mountainwireless.com/vzw_vm.htm

    Many numbers on the list, I imagine, are no longer any good. The ones
    in my area (310 and 818) are all dead now. Verizon Wireless is
    apparently trashing them gradually.
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