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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 1, 2005 9:03:15 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

I have a laptop and me and my sister uses it she is a admin and so am i
but she keeps on listening to my music and steeling them so im just
wondering if there was any way to keep my music folder locked from my
sis.Can someone help me? :( 


--
ken zen

More about : private

Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 1, 2005 9:03:16 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

HOW TO: Set the My Documents Folder as "Private" in Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;298399

You Cannot Select the "Make This Folder Private" Option
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;307286

How to set, view, change, or remove special permissions for files
and folders in Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;308419

--
Carey Frisch
Microsoft MVP
Windows XP - Shell/User
Microsoft Newsgroups

Get Windows XP Service Pack 2 with Advanced Security Technologies:
http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/protect/window...

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"ken zen" wrote:

| I have a laptop and me and my sister uses it she is a admin and so am i
| but she keeps on listening to my music and steeling them so im just
| wondering if there was any way to keep my music folder locked from my
| sis.Can someone help me? :( 
| --
| ken zen
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 1, 2005 9:03:16 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

In addition to Carey's advice, if you let your sister run as an Administrator, there's nothing to prevent her from taking ownership of any file/folder she wishes to.

--
Doug Knox, MS-MVP Windows Media Center\Windows Powered Smart Display\Security
Win 95/98/Me/XP Tweaks and Fixes
http://www.dougknox.com
--------------------------------
Per user Group Policy Restrictions for XP Home and XP Pro
http://www.dougknox.com/xp/utils/xp_securityconsole.htm
--------------------------------
Please reply only to the newsgroup so all may benefit.
Unsolicited e-mail is not answered.

"ken zen" <ken.zen.1pykdo@pcbanter.net> wrote in message news:ken.zen.1pykdo@pcbanter.net...
>
> I have a laptop and me and my sister uses it she is a admin and so am i
> but she keeps on listening to my music and steeling them so im just
> wondering if there was any way to keep my music folder locked from my
> sis.Can someone help me? :( 
>
>
> --
> ken zen
June 2, 2005 1:36:19 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

"ken zen" <ken.zen.1pykdo@pcbanter.net> wrote in message
news:ken.zen.1pykdo@pcbanter.net...
>
> I have a laptop and me and my sister uses it she is a admin and so am
> i
> but she keeps on listening to my music and steeling them so im just
> wondering if there was any way to keep my music folder locked from my
> sis.Can someone help me? :( 


Any administrator account can take ownership of anyone's files.
However, that is only ownership. No administrator (in Windows XP) can
actually read the file if you use EFS (encrypting file system). By
default, the Administrator (and other admin accounts) are *not* included
in the EFS certificate that you create under your account unless you add
them as a recovery agent (in Windows 2000, the Administrator account was
added by default, but not in Windows XP). So you can fight over who has
ownership of the file but only you can actually read (i.e., play) them.

Remember to export your EFS certificate to a floppy or CD and lock it in
a safe place (so your sister cannot get it). When exporting, you also
have the option to specify a password, so use a different one that for
your account login (and one that you won't forget but one your sister
won't guess). You'll also need this exported copy of the EFS cert if
you reinstall Windows since you'll need to import that particular cert
to read the encrypted files that used that cert.

You will need Windows XP Professional to have it include support for
EFS. If you have Windows XP Home, you screwed yourself by going cheap
to get a crippled version of the operating system. In you only have
Windows XP Home, you could archive the files into a .zip file that is
password protected but you'll need a 3rd party zip tool that lets you
password-protect a .zip file. Again, you need to use a password that
you will remember but your sister cannot guess.
!