Problem solve this...

I just installed a new Sapphire ATI Radeon 4870 1gb video card into my HP which has these specs: AMD Athlon 64 x2 dual core 5000+ 2.6Ghz, 3gb RAM, 400GB hard drive. I'm playing Red Faction: Guerrilla (which is THE BEST game of all time). Only problem is I am a newb to pc gaming but I think I have a good enough system to play smoothly, but when I'm blowing stuff up, or lots of things are going on around me in a battle, the computer chops up and freezes for 5 or 6 seconds at a time. (I did install the latest drivers for the ATI 4870 when I installed it). Any thoughts? I know you'll need other info I'm sure, as I don't know much about this stuff, so just ask and tell me where to find it and I'll get it for you. THANKS YOU COMPUTER GENIOUSES!!!
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More about problem solve this
  1. Doubt its your GPU, more than likely your CPU is the problem. Its pretty low end by today's standards. Try OCing it and see if that helps.
  2. did you upgrade your power supply as well
  3. its the CPU bud.

    guerilla is very CPU dependant due to the massive ammounts of calculations needed when stuff gets destroyed. even my phenom II slows down when i detonat a ton of explosives inside a building.

    overclocking may help a little, but to be honest you'll probably need to upgrade your CPU to get decent performance.

    i recomend the phenom II 550 BE. its cheap but has bags of performance. and you wont need to upgrade your mobo for it.
  4. welshmousepk said:
    its the CPU bud.

    guerilla is very CPU dependant due to the massive ammounts of calculations needed when stuff gets destroyed. even my phenom II slows down when i detonat a ton of explosives inside a building.

    overclocking may help a little, but to be honest you'll probably need to upgrade your CPU to get decent performance.

    i recomend the phenom II 550 BE. its cheap but has bags of performance. and you wont need to upgrade your mobo for it.


    Thanks for your reply. I took your advice and bought the phenom II 550 BE as suggested. When I tried to install it the PC wouldn't power on. The fans worked, but nothing else. Are you sure my motherboard will support it? How do you know this? I looked on the hp website tonight and the phenom II 550 BE isn't listed as a supported CPU. Please tell me I didn't buy a $100 piece of trash because I took your word for it instead of researching myself....
  5. Quote:
    Thanks for your reply. I took your advice and bought the phenom II 550 BE as suggested. When I tried to install it the PC wouldn't power on. The fans worked, but nothing else. Are you sure my motherboard will support it? How do you know this? I looked on the hp website tonight and the phenom II 550 BE isn't listed as a supported CPU. Please tell me I didn't buy a $100 piece of trash because I took your word for it instead of researching myself....



    Does it beep at all? If so, how many?

    You didn't post the model number of your HP, but it's a AM2 motherboard. Most, but not all of them support AM3 CPU's like
    the 550. Many motherboard manufacturers provided BIOS updates that add AM3 support to AM2+ montherboard. Unfortunately
    many system manufacturers don't want their customers to simply drop in a new CPU as they would like to sell you a new
    system instead.

    If you have looked at the CPU support list for your system, and have not found any AM3 CPU's listed, they may not be
    compatible with your motherboard.

    I would suggest sending the CPU back (if possible) and picking one that is listed as compatible with your system.
  6. maddoxman said:
    Does it beep at all? If so, how many?

    You didn't post the model number of your HP, but it's a AM2 motherboard. Most, but not all of them support AM3 CPU's like
    the 550. Many motherboard manufacturers provided BIOS updates that add AM3 support to AM2+ montherboard. Unfortunately
    many system manufacturers don't want their customers to simply drop in a new CPU as they would like to sell you a new
    system instead.

    If you have looked at the CPU support list for your system, and have not found any AM3 CPU's listed, they may not be
    compatible with your motherboard.

    I would suggest sending the CPU back (if possible) and picking one that is listed as compatible with your system.


    No beeps at all. The fans power on but the button that normally turns the thing on doesn't light up or do anything when pressed. I reinstalled the old processor with the new heat sink (which looks nearly identical to the old heat sink) and it works fine again.

    My problem is I'm a busy family practice doctor and don't have time to run back and forth to the freakin post office or research all this stuff in depth, which is why I was relying on experts in here to give me good advice. My own fault, yes, but if you want to gain users and site traffic, this certainly isn't the way to do it. (not speaking directly to maddoxman here)
  7. Yes there is a lot of full hardy I know it all people on most forums, so I guess you can take that as a lesson learned. There are 3 possible reasons for your system not booting up as you stated with the new CPU.

    One is that the new CPU in conjunction with the new Graphics Card you have purchased is now drawing far too much power from your PSU (Power Supply Unit) and as a result will not even let your system boot up. A second reason could be that as maddoxman said, your firmware might need updated on your motherboard to be compatible with the new CPU (firmware is like software which controls your motherboard) Or the third unlucky one is that your motherboard is just not compatible with the new CPU and you will then need to buy a new motherboard.

    All 3 ways to fix this issue will be time consuming and possibly expensive if you don’t have parts around to test for the issue before you buy the replacement part or installing the firmware that is needed. For instance to test if it’s the PSU that is inadequate you will need to plug a new higher powered one in its place to test to see if this is the issue.

    If the firmware is of issue it’s the best and cheapest option to fix, but again you will need someone who knows what they are doing to find out what is the exact make and model of your PC’s motherboard (The HP website won’t normally tell you this) and then update its firmware accordingly. Keep in mind that you will need to make double if not triple sure that you are installing the correct firmware for your motherboard for the simple fact that if you install the wrong version, you could turn your good working mobo in to a fairly expensive paperweight. Also another factor in Branded PC’s when it comes to motherboards is that they normally use custom made motherboards by the manufacturers to prevent people updating their firmware and using faster CPU’s but mainly because it’s cheaper to create a new motherboard without the features you won’t need when building custom PC so you might not even be able to get a firmware update at all.

    And on the last issue, it could well be that your motherboard just won’t run the CPU and in that case you will need to get a new one. I would just as a side note, test the motherboard out to see if it is the issue after changing the PSU as it’s a lot more hassle to change a motherboard than it is the PSU.

    Keep in mind that it might not only be one of these problems it could be that once you install a new motherboard you might have to install a bigger PSU so it could get fairly expensive. The only reason I have typed all this out is because I don’t think you will get a refund on your CPU so wish to make the best out of a bad situation. Again don’t believe first off what people are saying on forums as most people are up their own asses tech expert wonnabies, if you want something done right, more than often your best doing it yourself.
  8. What is the make/model of your PC?
  9. cafuddled said:
    Yes there is a lot of full hardy I know it all people on most forums, so I guess you can take that as a lesson learned. There are 3 possible reasons for your system not booting up as you stated with the new CPU.

    One is that the new CPU in conjunction with the new Graphics Card you have purchased is now drawing far too much power from your PSU (Power Supply Unit) and as a result will not even let your system boot up. A second reason could be that as maddoxman said, your firmware might need updated on your motherboard to be compatible with the new CPU (firmware is like software which controls your motherboard) Or the third unlucky one is that your motherboard is just not compatible with the new CPU and you will then need to buy a new motherboard.

    All 3 ways to fix this issue will be time consuming and possibly expensive if you don’t have parts around to test for the issue before you buy the replacement part or installing the firmware that is needed. For instance to test if it’s the PSU that is inadequate you will need to plug a new higher powered one in its place to test to see if this is the issue.

    If the firmware is of issue it’s the best and cheapest option to fix, but again you will need someone who knows what they are doing to find out what is the exact make and model of your PC’s motherboard (The HP website won’t normally tell you this) and then update its firmware accordingly. Keep in mind that you will need to make double if not triple sure that you are installing the correct firmware for your motherboard for the simple fact that if you install the wrong version, you could turn your good working mobo in to a fairly expensive paperweight. Also another factor in Branded PC’s when it comes to motherboards is that they normally use custom made motherboards by the manufacturers to prevent people updating their firmware and using faster CPU’s but mainly because it’s cheaper to create a new motherboard without the features you won’t need when building custom PC so you might not even be able to get a firmware update at all.

    And on the last issue, it could well be that your motherboard just won’t run the CPU and in that case you will need to get a new one. I would just as a side note, test the motherboard out to see if it is the issue after changing the PSU as it’s a lot more hassle to change a motherboard than it is the PSU.

    Keep in mind that it might not only be one of these problems it could be that once you install a new motherboard you might have to install a bigger PSU so it could get fairly expensive. The only reason I have typed all this out is because I don’t think you will get a refund on your CPU so wish to make the best out of a bad situation. Again don’t believe first off what people are saying on forums as most people are up their own asses tech expert wonnabies, if you want something done right, more than often your best doing it yourself.


    I appreciate your time and effort. I ran the calculators the best I could and came up to a max of 470 watts required, and I installed a new 585 watt PS before all this. Maybe I'm leaving something out, but I'm hoping it's the firmware thing you mentioned.

    I'll do some more research on the firmware update and see if I can make that work. Thanks again... -doc
  10. maddoxman said:
    What is the make/model of your PC?


    HP Pavilion A6130N
  11. From what I can find, your MB does not seem to support AM3 processors.


    There is a BIOS update listed on HP's website under the model # you gave, but I doubt it'll help
    anything. It mentions nothing about new or increased CPU compatibility.
  12. Sorry bud it seems that your motherboard ECS MCP61PM-HM does not support AM3, even with a bios update. Looks like it's a new motherboard after all... Think of it this way at least you will have a much better motherboard now...
  13. cafuddled said:
    Sorry bud it seems that your motherboard ECS MCP61PM-HM does not support AM3, even with a bios update. Looks like it's a new motherboard after all... Think of it this way at least you will have a much better motherboard now...


    I was afraid of that. Thanks a million welshmousepk for the bogus advice that cost me $100 plus about 2 hours of screwing around (@$500/hr for my billable time playing doctor).

    Lesson learned... I guess. I knew better than to just trust a forum ghost without verifying for myself. Gamble that didn't really pay off...

    Now, however, I have bought a new ATI 4870, new PS, new Phenom II 550 BE, so I guess I'll just have to go the distance and get a new case, mobo, and about 8 gigs of corsair, couple of TB hard drive, and whatever else I'm going to need. Didn't intend on getting this involved; and I probably would've got a higher end processor if I'd known I was going to just start from scratch.

    Thanks again to those who helped with intelligent advice.

    Any suggestions on what you would choose from this point if money was no object? I originally wanted to spend a couple hundred bucks making my machine faster but by now I've gone and pissed myself off and thrown the budget out the window. :o
  14. No budget huh... :)

    You’re kinda off to a bad start with that CPU I must say, to be honest your best to just get yourself the motherboard (remember and get one that fits in your case!) and wait a year or two and if your still in to PC gaming (if you play the right games you more than likely will be), upgrade then.

    But if money where no object, but with an outlook for most bang for your buck:

    • Core i7 920 D0 Stepping CPU £206
    • ASUS P6T X58 Motherboard £169
    • 6GBs of tri channel DDR3 1800MHz RAM £149
    • Sapphire 5870 1024MB GDDR5 GPU £299
    • OCZ Summit Series 120GB 2.5” SSD (Solid State Drive ’Very Fast Hard Disk’) £243

    All that would give one of the best gaming PC’s in the world and for only £1066... err $1200, you might need a new case as well though lol.
  15. cafuddled said:
    No budget huh... :)

    You’re kinda off to a bad start with that CPU I must say, to be honest your best to just get yourself the motherboard (remember and get one that fits in your case!) and wait a year or two and if your still in to PC gaming (if you play the right games you more than likely will be), upgrade then.

    But if money where no object, but with an outlook for most bang for your buck:

    • Core i7 920 D0 Stepping CPU £206
    • ASUS P6T X58 Motherboard £169
    • 6GBs of tri channel DDR3 1800MHz RAM £149
    • Sapphire 5870 1024MB GDDR5 GPU £299
    • OCZ Summit Series 120GB 2.5” SSD (Solid State Drive ’Very Fast Hard Disk’) £243

    All that would give one of the best gaming PC’s in the world and for only £1066... err $1200, you might need a new case as well though lol.


    Wow, I was expecting upwards of $3000. I think I'll take your advice and just back off and get the motherboard (and thanks for the size heads-up!). I suspect in a year or two I'll have to come back here and ask the same question and get a whole different answer on whats the best. I have a lot of respect for you people that keep all this stuff straight. I find it easier to stabilize a trauma patient in the ER than to do this stuff...
  16. Well, it's your decision.


    Good luck...
  17. I had the same problem. When I was playing a certain game in particular, my x1950 pro would lag like crap. Then I put a GTX 216 in and it ran smooth as butter.

    The x1950 pro didn't lag on any other games, so maybe it was a fluke. But I did reinstall the game and had the same problem till I switched GPUs.

    I know some games like nvidia better, and some like ati better.

    And hey Doc if you looking to build a sweet system.... Buy a i5 750, with a gigabyte mobo and some ram and overclock that puppy. The core components there will only cost you another 500$ and you will be smoking games like ciggarettes
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