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back up c drive

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Anonymous
July 6, 2005 5:32:48 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

How do I back up my system?

More about : back drive

Anonymous
July 6, 2005 5:32:49 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

There's basically 2 ways to backup your system.

The first is to backup all of your files. MSBackup usually comes on the
system that you've got and is fairly good for this purpose. I prefer the
free version of SyncBack, and others prefer the free version of Cobian Backup
(you can Google for these programs).

The next option is to create an image of your hard drive. This copies
everything in one big chunk - and can be used to restore your system if it
crashes. While there are free programs that do this, I prefer Acronis True
Image because it works within Windows - which most of the other programs
don't. The benefit of the program is that I can reboot with the Acronis
recovery CD and be back up and running within 20 minutes. The Acronis
program costs about $50.

I use both programs in combination to protect my files. I backup all of my
data/personal files using the SyncBack program on a daily basis. I use the
Acronis program to image my hard drive on a weekly basis - I save 7 copies of
it and overwrite the oldest as I go along.

"John Torrie" wrote:

> How do I back up my system?
>
>
>
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 5:32:49 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

In news:o gB5DDlgFHA.2904@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl,
John Torrie <jtorrie@triad.rr.com> typed:

> How do I back up my system?


It is always possible that a hard drive crash, user error, nearby
lightning strike, virus attack, even theft of the computer, can
cause the loss of everything on your drive. As has often been
said, it's not a matter of whether you will have such a problem,
but when.



Essentially you should back up what you can't afford to
lose--what you can't readily recreate. What that is depends on
how you use your computer and what you use it for.



It takes time and effort to backup, but it also takes time and
effort to recreate lost data. If you back up daily, you should
never have to recreate more than one day's worth of last data. If
weekly, there's potentially a lot more to recreate. You should
assess how much pain and trouble you would have if you lost x
days of data, and then choose a backup frequency that doesn't
involve more pain and trouble than that you would have if you had
to recreate what was lost.



At one extreme is the professional user who would likely go out
of business if his data was lost. He probably needs to back up at
least daily. At the other extreme is the kid who doesn't use his
game except to play games. He probably needs no backup at all,
since worst case he can easily reinstall his games.



Most of us fall somewhere between those extremes, but nobody can
tell you where you fall; you need to determine that for yourself.



Should you back up Windows? Should you back up your applications?
Most people will tell you no, since you can always reinstall
these easily from the original media. But I don't think the
answer is so clear-cut. Many people have substantial time and
effort invested in customizing Windows and configuring their apps
to work the way they want to. Putting all of that back the way it
was can be a difficult, time-consuming effort. Whether you should
backup up Windows and apps depends, once again, on you.



How to backup? What software to use? There are many choices,
including the Windows-supplied backup program. Which choice is
best for you depends at least in part on the answers to some of
the questions above.



Finally what backup media should you choose, and how should it be
stored? There are many choices, including CDs, tape, zip drives,
and second hard drives.



I don't recommend backup to a second non-removable hard drive
because it leaves you susceptible to simultaneous loss of the
original and backup to many of the most common dangers: severe
power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, virus attacks, even
theft of the computer.



In my view, secure backup needs to be on removable media, and not
kept in the computer. For really secure backup (needed, for
example, if the life of your business depends on your data) you
should have multiple generations of backup, and at least one of
those generations should be stored off-site.



My computer isn't used for business, but my personal backup
scheme uses two identical removable hard drives, which fit into a
sleeve installed in the computer. I alternate between the two,
and use Drive Image to make a complete copy of the primary drive.



--
Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
Please reply to the newsgroup
Related resources
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 5:32:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Norton Ghost does everything that Arconis True Image does, and more. You
can boot from the Norton Ghost disc, and you can recover individual files
from the Ghost image instead of having to do a full restore. Ghost also
allows you to keep multiple images and has an image browser that allows you
to track the differences. For the money, Ghost is a much better program.

Bobby

"usasma" <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:8E4D6ED9-6988-43E1-AA1F-7D2B389A9416@microsoft.com...
> There's basically 2 ways to backup your system.
>
> The first is to backup all of your files. MSBackup usually comes on the
> system that you've got and is fairly good for this purpose. I prefer the
> free version of SyncBack, and others prefer the free version of Cobian
> Backup
> (you can Google for these programs).
>
> The next option is to create an image of your hard drive. This copies
> everything in one big chunk - and can be used to restore your system if it
> crashes. While there are free programs that do this, I prefer Acronis
> True
> Image because it works within Windows - which most of the other programs
> don't. The benefit of the program is that I can reboot with the Acronis
> recovery CD and be back up and running within 20 minutes. The Acronis
> program costs about $50.
>
> I use both programs in combination to protect my files. I backup all of
> my
> data/personal files using the SyncBack program on a daily basis. I use
> the
> Acronis program to image my hard drive on a weekly basis - I save 7 copies
> of
> it and overwrite the oldest as I go along.
>
> "John Torrie" wrote:
>
>> How do I back up my system?
>>
>>
>>
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 5:32:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Nice job Ken :-)

--

Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


"Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
news:uVKAuylgFHA.3936@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> In news:o gB5DDlgFHA.2904@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl,
> John Torrie <jtorrie@triad.rr.com> typed:
>
> > How do I back up my system?
>
>
> It is always possible that a hard drive crash, user error, nearby
> lightning strike, virus attack, even theft of the computer, can
> cause the loss of everything on your drive. As has often been
> said, it's not a matter of whether you will have such a problem,
> but when.
>
>
>
> Essentially you should back up what you can't afford to
> lose--what you can't readily recreate. What that is depends on
> how you use your computer and what you use it for.
>
>
>
> It takes time and effort to backup, but it also takes time and
> effort to recreate lost data. If you back up daily, you should
> never have to recreate more than one day's worth of last data. If
> weekly, there's potentially a lot more to recreate. You should
> assess how much pain and trouble you would have if you lost x
> days of data, and then choose a backup frequency that doesn't
> involve more pain and trouble than that you would have if you had
> to recreate what was lost.
>
>
>
> At one extreme is the professional user who would likely go out
> of business if his data was lost. He probably needs to back up at
> least daily. At the other extreme is the kid who doesn't use his
> game except to play games. He probably needs no backup at all,
> since worst case he can easily reinstall his games.
>
>
>
> Most of us fall somewhere between those extremes, but nobody can
> tell you where you fall; you need to determine that for yourself.
>
>
>
> Should you back up Windows? Should you back up your applications?
> Most people will tell you no, since you can always reinstall
> these easily from the original media. But I don't think the
> answer is so clear-cut. Many people have substantial time and
> effort invested in customizing Windows and configuring their apps
> to work the way they want to. Putting all of that back the way it
> was can be a difficult, time-consuming effort. Whether you should
> backup up Windows and apps depends, once again, on you.
>
>
>
> How to backup? What software to use? There are many choices,
> including the Windows-supplied backup program. Which choice is
> best for you depends at least in part on the answers to some of
> the questions above.
>
>
>
> Finally what backup media should you choose, and how should it be
> stored? There are many choices, including CDs, tape, zip drives,
> and second hard drives.
>
>
>
> I don't recommend backup to a second non-removable hard drive
> because it leaves you susceptible to simultaneous loss of the
> original and backup to many of the most common dangers: severe
> power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, virus attacks, even
> theft of the computer.
>
>
>
> In my view, secure backup needs to be on removable media, and not
> kept in the computer. For really secure backup (needed, for
> example, if the life of your business depends on your data) you
> should have multiple generations of backup, and at least one of
> those generations should be stored off-site.
>
>
>
> My computer isn't used for business, but my personal backup
> scheme uses two identical removable hard drives, which fit into a
> sleeve installed in the computer. I alternate between the two,
> and use Drive Image to make a complete copy of the primary drive.
>
>
>
> --
> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
> Please reply to the newsgroup
>
>
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 5:32:51 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

In news:o PC5$HmgFHA.2700@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl,
Harry Ohrn <harry---@webtree.ca> typed:

> Nice job Ken :-)


Thanks very much, Harry.

--
Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
Please reply to the newsgroup



> "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
> news:uVKAuylgFHA.3936@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> In news:o gB5DDlgFHA.2904@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl,
>> John Torrie <jtorrie@triad.rr.com> typed:
>>
>>> How do I back up my system?
>>
>>
>> It is always possible that a hard drive crash, user error,
>> nearby
>> lightning strike, virus attack, even theft of the computer,
>> can
>> cause the loss of everything on your drive. As has often been
>> said, it's not a matter of whether you will have such a
>> problem,
>> but when.
>>
>>
>>
>> Essentially you should back up what you can't afford to
>> lose--what you can't readily recreate. What that is depends on
>> how you use your computer and what you use it for.
>>
>>
>>
>> It takes time and effort to backup, but it also takes time and
>> effort to recreate lost data. If you back up daily, you should
>> never have to recreate more than one day's worth of last data.
>> If
>> weekly, there's potentially a lot more to recreate. You should
>> assess how much pain and trouble you would have if you lost x
>> days of data, and then choose a backup frequency that doesn't
>> involve more pain and trouble than that you would have if you
>> had
>> to recreate what was lost.
>>
>>
>>
>> At one extreme is the professional user who would likely go
>> out
>> of business if his data was lost. He probably needs to back up
>> at
>> least daily. At the other extreme is the kid who doesn't use
>> his
>> game except to play games. He probably needs no backup at all,
>> since worst case he can easily reinstall his games.
>>
>>
>>
>> Most of us fall somewhere between those extremes, but nobody
>> can
>> tell you where you fall; you need to determine that for
>> yourself.
>>
>>
>>
>> Should you back up Windows? Should you back up your
>> applications?
>> Most people will tell you no, since you can always reinstall
>> these easily from the original media. But I don't think the
>> answer is so clear-cut. Many people have substantial time and
>> effort invested in customizing Windows and configuring their
>> apps
>> to work the way they want to. Putting all of that back the way
>> it
>> was can be a difficult, time-consuming effort. Whether you
>> should
>> backup up Windows and apps depends, once again, on you.
>>
>>
>>
>> How to backup? What software to use? There are many choices,
>> including the Windows-supplied backup program. Which choice is
>> best for you depends at least in part on the answers to some
>> of
>> the questions above.
>>
>>
>>
>> Finally what backup media should you choose, and how should it
>> be
>> stored? There are many choices, including CDs, tape, zip
>> drives,
>> and second hard drives.
>>
>>
>>
>> I don't recommend backup to a second non-removable hard drive
>> because it leaves you susceptible to simultaneous loss of the
>> original and backup to many of the most common dangers: severe
>> power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, virus attacks, even
>> theft of the computer.
>>
>>
>>
>> In my view, secure backup needs to be on removable media, and
>> not
>> kept in the computer. For really secure backup (needed, for
>> example, if the life of your business depends on your data)
>> you
>> should have multiple generations of backup, and at least one
>> of
>> those generations should be stored off-site.
>>
>>
>>
>> My computer isn't used for business, but my personal backup
>> scheme uses two identical removable hard drives, which fit
>> into a
>> sleeve installed in the computer. I alternate between the two,
>> and use Drive Image to make a complete copy of the primary
>> drive.
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
>> Please reply to the newsgroup
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 5:36:14 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

As Ken points out there are many ways to create backups. The most important
first step is to ask yourself why you feel a need to do this. As Ken points
out the main reason is usually to ensure that you have a second copy of your
important data and to realize that your data is stored on a device that will
fail at some point either due to mechanical, catastrophic event or human
error. Even if one doesn't care about data loss it is still prudent to make
system state backups as these will quickly facilitate recovery. A typical
reinstall of Windows then patching and adding software usually takes many
hours where as loading an image of the system back will take a few minutes.

Personally I create 2 types of backup.

1) The first is a data backup. I run it as a scheduled event daily and
create a backup of my important data such as the My Documents folder and my
Outlook Express store. One can use the MS Backup program that is installed
if you have XP Pro but needs to be installed manually if you have XP Home -
see here http://www.onecomputerguy.com/windowsxp_tips.htm#backup...
Personally I use a third party program called Second Copy. this low cost
program will do scheduled and incremental backups. It will copy a deleted or
changed file to a safe location before the file is replaced. This way I can
review the file or folder before making a decision to dump it or return it
again.

2) The second type of backup is a full system state. This I do once per week
or just before making any critical changes such as installing a Service
Pack. Personally I use Acronis TrueImage but there are several others that
work very well including the Drive Image program Ken made reference to. A
full system backup will take time depending on the speed of your system and
the amount of data to backup. I have USB 2.0 drive enclosures and have 120GB
Hard Drives in them. These work very well for my purpose. For example I had
a hard drive failure. It took me 10 minutes to change out hard drives and 20
minutes to restore the system state. I was back up and running in 30
minutes. Then I transferred back a few files from my data backup. Very easy
to do.

As Ken mentioned it is important that you move your backups off site as a
fire or theft makes backups useless if they are in the same location as the
original.


--

Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


"John Torrie" <jtorrie@triad.rr.com> wrote in message
news:o gB5DDlgFHA.2904@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> How do I back up my system?
>
>
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 6:32:28 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

There is one huge difference between Norton Ghost and Acronis TrueImage and
that is the word Symantec ;-)

Seriously though having used both products extensively I have never had an
Acronis TrueImage restore fail however I have had Ghost fail several times.
BTW which version of Ghost will allow you to restore individual files using
the boot CD? I know that you can use the Ghost Explorer to recover
individual files but so does Acronis TrueImage.

--

Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


"NoNoBadDog!" <no_@spam_verizon.net> wrote in message
news:%23%23eer5lgFHA.1252@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Norton Ghost does everything that Arconis True Image does, and more. You
> can boot from the Norton Ghost disc, and you can recover individual files
> from the Ghost image instead of having to do a full restore. Ghost also
> allows you to keep multiple images and has an image browser that allows
you
> to track the differences. For the money, Ghost is a much better program.
>
> Bobby
>
> "usasma" <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:8E4D6ED9-6988-43E1-AA1F-7D2B389A9416@microsoft.com...
> > There's basically 2 ways to backup your system.
> >
> > The first is to backup all of your files. MSBackup usually comes on the
> > system that you've got and is fairly good for this purpose. I prefer
the
> > free version of SyncBack, and others prefer the free version of Cobian
> > Backup
> > (you can Google for these programs).
> >
> > The next option is to create an image of your hard drive. This copies
> > everything in one big chunk - and can be used to restore your system if
it
> > crashes. While there are free programs that do this, I prefer Acronis
> > True
> > Image because it works within Windows - which most of the other programs
> > don't. The benefit of the program is that I can reboot with the Acronis
> > recovery CD and be back up and running within 20 minutes. The Acronis
> > program costs about $50.
> >
> > I use both programs in combination to protect my files. I backup all of
> > my
> > data/personal files using the SyncBack program on a daily basis. I use
> > the
> > Acronis program to image my hard drive on a weekly basis - I save 7
copies
> > of
> > it and overwrite the oldest as I go along.
> >
> > "John Torrie" wrote:
> >
> >> How do I back up my system?
> >>
> >>
> >>
>
>
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 8:35:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

I have Ghost 9.0. (but was not using it) After installing a SATA drive and
missing trying to use the Windows wizard to transfer files and setting from
the old IDE drive now drive D: to the SATA now C: I finished by reformatting
the IDE (removing the SATA drive) with Windows and trying to then putting the
SATA back in the system and booting from d: I found that software that
required purchasing a "key" for was no longer registered and that I could not
from SATA. So I reformatted the SATA figuring that all the information I was
wanting to save was gone anyway. Today (finally) I recognized that I need a
reliable back up strategy. Will "ghosting" c: to dvd's create a copy that I
can install and run with without having to re-install Windows, Works Suites,
Nortons printer and scanner drivers and others that I have disks for +
Omnipage, Websters and several programs that I have paid for then installed
keys to use them.

Second question d: (and c:)  both have Windows installed on them and I can
not format d: because I get an error message telling Windows is using files
on it.

Grady

"Ken Blake" wrote:

> In news:o gB5DDlgFHA.2904@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl,
> John Torrie <jtorrie@triad.rr.com> typed:
>
> > How do I back up my system?
>
>
> It is always possible that a hard drive crash, user error, nearby
> lightning strike, virus attack, even theft of the computer, can
> cause the loss of everything on your drive. As has often been
> said, it's not a matter of whether you will have such a problem,
> but when.
>
>
>
> Essentially you should back up what you can't afford to
> lose--what you can't readily recreate. What that is depends on
> how you use your computer and what you use it for.
>
>
>
> It takes time and effort to backup, but it also takes time and
> effort to recreate lost data. If you back up daily, you should
> never have to recreate more than one day's worth of last data. If
> weekly, there's potentially a lot more to recreate. You should
> assess how much pain and trouble you would have if you lost x
> days of data, and then choose a backup frequency that doesn't
> involve more pain and trouble than that you would have if you had
> to recreate what was lost.
>
>
>
> At one extreme is the professional user who would likely go out
> of business if his data was lost. He probably needs to back up at
> least daily. At the other extreme is the kid who doesn't use his
> game except to play games. He probably needs no backup at all,
> since worst case he can easily reinstall his games.
>
>
>
> Most of us fall somewhere between those extremes, but nobody can
> tell you where you fall; you need to determine that for yourself.
>
>
>
> Should you back up Windows? Should you back up your applications?
> Most people will tell you no, since you can always reinstall
> these easily from the original media. But I don't think the
> answer is so clear-cut. Many people have substantial time and
> effort invested in customizing Windows and configuring their apps
> to work the way they want to. Putting all of that back the way it
> was can be a difficult, time-consuming effort. Whether you should
> backup up Windows and apps depends, once again, on you.
>
>
>
> How to backup? What software to use? There are many choices,
> including the Windows-supplied backup program. Which choice is
> best for you depends at least in part on the answers to some of
> the questions above.
>
>
>
> Finally what backup media should you choose, and how should it be
> stored? There are many choices, including CDs, tape, zip drives,
> and second hard drives.
>
>
>
> I don't recommend backup to a second non-removable hard drive
> because it leaves you susceptible to simultaneous loss of the
> original and backup to many of the most common dangers: severe
> power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, virus attacks, even
> theft of the computer.
>
>
>
> In my view, secure backup needs to be on removable media, and not
> kept in the computer. For really secure backup (needed, for
> example, if the life of your business depends on your data) you
> should have multiple generations of backup, and at least one of
> those generations should be stored off-site.
>
>
>
> My computer isn't used for business, but my personal backup
> scheme uses two identical removable hard drives, which fit into a
> sleeve installed in the computer. I alternate between the two,
> and use Drive Image to make a complete copy of the primary drive.
>
>
>
> --
> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
> Please reply to the newsgroup
>
>
>
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 8:55:29 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Sorry, I have to stick my nose in here...

If you're opposed to Symantec software on principal, that's your perfect
right, but I don't think that's sufficient reason to dissuade the OP from
trying Ghost.

Norton Ghost, when installed from a Ghost CD, is unique among Norton branded
software in that it does not have a large footprint, does not sink deep
hooks into the system and does not affect the computer's performance.

I started using Ghost with the 2003 version (Ghost 9.0 is a nice
improvement) and I have never had an image restore fail. In fact, no part of
the program has ever failed me.

--
Ted Zieglar
"You can do it if you try."

"Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote in message
news:epYpWnmgFHA.2472@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> There is one huge difference between Norton Ghost and Acronis TrueImage
and
> that is the word Symantec ;-)
>
> Seriously though having used both products extensively I have never had an
> Acronis TrueImage restore fail however I have had Ghost fail several
times.
> BTW which version of Ghost will allow you to restore individual files
using
> the boot CD? I know that you can use the Ghost Explorer to recover
> individual files but so does Acronis TrueImage.
>
> --
>
> Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
> www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
>
>
> "NoNoBadDog!" <no_@spam_verizon.net> wrote in message
> news:%23%23eer5lgFHA.1252@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > Norton Ghost does everything that Arconis True Image does, and more.
You
> > can boot from the Norton Ghost disc, and you can recover individual
files
> > from the Ghost image instead of having to do a full restore. Ghost also
> > allows you to keep multiple images and has an image browser that allows
> you
> > to track the differences. For the money, Ghost is a much better
program.
> >
> > Bobby
> >
> > "usasma" <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> > news:8E4D6ED9-6988-43E1-AA1F-7D2B389A9416@microsoft.com...
> > > There's basically 2 ways to backup your system.
> > >
> > > The first is to backup all of your files. MSBackup usually comes on
the
> > > system that you've got and is fairly good for this purpose. I prefer
> the
> > > free version of SyncBack, and others prefer the free version of Cobian
> > > Backup
> > > (you can Google for these programs).
> > >
> > > The next option is to create an image of your hard drive. This copies
> > > everything in one big chunk - and can be used to restore your system
if
> it
> > > crashes. While there are free programs that do this, I prefer Acronis
> > > True
> > > Image because it works within Windows - which most of the other
programs
> > > don't. The benefit of the program is that I can reboot with the
Acronis
> > > recovery CD and be back up and running within 20 minutes. The Acronis
> > > program costs about $50.
> > >
> > > I use both programs in combination to protect my files. I backup all
of
> > > my
> > > data/personal files using the SyncBack program on a daily basis. I
use
> > > the
> > > Acronis program to image my hard drive on a weekly basis - I save 7
> copies
> > > of
> > > it and overwrite the oldest as I go along.
> > >
> > > "John Torrie" wrote:
> > >
> > >> How do I back up my system?
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>
> >
> >
>
>
July 7, 2005 2:52:33 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

The improvements in Norton Ghost are very largely due to the fact that
Norton bought PowerQuest and stuck their name on the Drive Image technology.
I won't say they didn't do anything at all to it but it is DI.
Billh

"Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
news:uLu3ozmgFHA.1244@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Sorry, I have to stick my nose in here...
>
> If you're opposed to Symantec software on principal, that's your perfect
> right, but I don't think that's sufficient reason to dissuade the OP from
> trying Ghost.
>
> Norton Ghost, when installed from a Ghost CD, is unique among Norton
> branded
> software in that it does not have a large footprint, does not sink deep
> hooks into the system and does not affect the computer's performance.
>
> I started using Ghost with the 2003 version (Ghost 9.0 is a nice
> improvement) and I have never had an image restore fail. In fact, no part
> of
> the program has ever failed me.
>
> --
> Ted Zieglar
> "You can do it if you try."
>
> "Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote in message
> news:epYpWnmgFHA.2472@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> There is one huge difference between Norton Ghost and Acronis TrueImage
> and
>> that is the word Symantec ;-)
>>
>> Seriously though having used both products extensively I have never had
>> an
>> Acronis TrueImage restore fail however I have had Ghost fail several
> times.
>> BTW which version of Ghost will allow you to restore individual files
> using
>> the boot CD? I know that you can use the Ghost Explorer to recover
>> individual files but so does Acronis TrueImage.
>>
>> --
>>
>> Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
>> www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
>>
>>
>> "NoNoBadDog!" <no_@spam_verizon.net> wrote in message
>> news:%23%23eer5lgFHA.1252@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> > Norton Ghost does everything that Arconis True Image does, and more.
> You
>> > can boot from the Norton Ghost disc, and you can recover individual
> files
>> > from the Ghost image instead of having to do a full restore. Ghost
>> > also
>> > allows you to keep multiple images and has an image browser that allows
>> you
>> > to track the differences. For the money, Ghost is a much better
> program.
>> >
>> > Bobby
>> >
>> > "usasma" <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> > news:8E4D6ED9-6988-43E1-AA1F-7D2B389A9416@microsoft.com...
>> > > There's basically 2 ways to backup your system.
>> > >
>> > > The first is to backup all of your files. MSBackup usually comes on
> the
>> > > system that you've got and is fairly good for this purpose. I prefer
>> the
>> > > free version of SyncBack, and others prefer the free version of
>> > > Cobian
>> > > Backup
>> > > (you can Google for these programs).
>> > >
>> > > The next option is to create an image of your hard drive. This
>> > > copies
>> > > everything in one big chunk - and can be used to restore your system
> if
>> it
>> > > crashes. While there are free programs that do this, I prefer
>> > > Acronis
>> > > True
>> > > Image because it works within Windows - which most of the other
> programs
>> > > don't. The benefit of the program is that I can reboot with the
> Acronis
>> > > recovery CD and be back up and running within 20 minutes. The
>> > > Acronis
>> > > program costs about $50.
>> > >
>> > > I use both programs in combination to protect my files. I backup all
> of
>> > > my
>> > > data/personal files using the SyncBack program on a daily basis. I
> use
>> > > the
>> > > Acronis program to image my hard drive on a weekly basis - I save 7
>> copies
>> > > of
>> > > it and overwrite the oldest as I go along.
>> > >
>> > > "John Torrie" wrote:
>> > >
>> > >> How do I back up my system?
>> > >>
>> > >>
>> > >>
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 3:12:50 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Ted you jumped the gun. I stated that I have used Ghost extensively and I
have had images fail to load. I was not simply speaking "on principle" as
you say.

--

Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


"Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
news:uLu3ozmgFHA.1244@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Sorry, I have to stick my nose in here...
>
> If you're opposed to Symantec software on principal, that's your perfect
> right, but I don't think that's sufficient reason to dissuade the OP from
> trying Ghost.
>
> Norton Ghost, when installed from a Ghost CD, is unique among Norton
> branded
> software in that it does not have a large footprint, does not sink deep
> hooks into the system and does not affect the computer's performance.
>
> I started using Ghost with the 2003 version (Ghost 9.0 is a nice
> improvement) and I have never had an image restore fail. In fact, no part
> of
> the program has ever failed me.
>
> --
> Ted Zieglar
> "You can do it if you try."
>
> "Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote in message
> news:epYpWnmgFHA.2472@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> There is one huge difference between Norton Ghost and Acronis TrueImage
> and
>> that is the word Symantec ;-)
>>
>> Seriously though having used both products extensively I have never had
>> an
>> Acronis TrueImage restore fail however I have had Ghost fail several
> times.
>> BTW which version of Ghost will allow you to restore individual files
> using
>> the boot CD? I know that you can use the Ghost Explorer to recover
>> individual files but so does Acronis TrueImage.
>>
>> --
>>
>> Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
>> www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
>>
>>
>> "NoNoBadDog!" <no_@spam_verizon.net> wrote in message
>> news:%23%23eer5lgFHA.1252@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> > Norton Ghost does everything that Arconis True Image does, and more.
> You
>> > can boot from the Norton Ghost disc, and you can recover individual
> files
>> > from the Ghost image instead of having to do a full restore. Ghost
>> > also
>> > allows you to keep multiple images and has an image browser that allows
>> you
>> > to track the differences. For the money, Ghost is a much better
> program.
>> >
>> > Bobby
>> >
>> > "usasma" <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> > news:8E4D6ED9-6988-43E1-AA1F-7D2B389A9416@microsoft.com...
>> > > There's basically 2 ways to backup your system.
>> > >
>> > > The first is to backup all of your files. MSBackup usually comes on
> the
>> > > system that you've got and is fairly good for this purpose. I prefer
>> the
>> > > free version of SyncBack, and others prefer the free version of
>> > > Cobian
>> > > Backup
>> > > (you can Google for these programs).
>> > >
>> > > The next option is to create an image of your hard drive. This
>> > > copies
>> > > everything in one big chunk - and can be used to restore your system
> if
>> it
>> > > crashes. While there are free programs that do this, I prefer
>> > > Acronis
>> > > True
>> > > Image because it works within Windows - which most of the other
> programs
>> > > don't. The benefit of the program is that I can reboot with the
> Acronis
>> > > recovery CD and be back up and running within 20 minutes. The
>> > > Acronis
>> > > program costs about $50.
>> > >
>> > > I use both programs in combination to protect my files. I backup all
> of
>> > > my
>> > > data/personal files using the SyncBack program on a daily basis. I
> use
>> > > the
>> > > Acronis program to image my hard drive on a weekly basis - I save 7
>> copies
>> > > of
>> > > it and overwrite the oldest as I go along.
>> > >
>> > > "John Torrie" wrote:
>> > >
>> > >> How do I back up my system?
>> > >>
>> > >>
>> > >>
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 3:27:55 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Hi Harry,

Because I wanted to be certain of my answer, I just booted my computer with
both True Image 8 CD and with Ghost 9 CD.

The Ghost 9 CD "does" allow you to restore individual files from an image
you have created. It's image explorer is fully functional under the recovery
environment. Thus you can replace ntldr when it goes missing etc. It also
allows you to edit partition tables (a huge plus when a drive/partition
shows as RAW - if you know what you are doing).

True Image only allows a full restore under their recovery environment.

Hope this helps (-:

--
Regards,

Richard Urban

If you knew as much as you thought you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!


"Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote in message
news:epYpWnmgFHA.2472@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> There is one huge difference between Norton Ghost and Acronis TrueImage
> and
> that is the word Symantec ;-)
>
> Seriously though having used both products extensively I have never had an
> Acronis TrueImage restore fail however I have had Ghost fail several
> times.
> BTW which version of Ghost will allow you to restore individual files
> using
> the boot CD? I know that you can use the Ghost Explorer to recover
> individual files but so does Acronis TrueImage.
>
> --
>
> Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
> www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
>
>
> "NoNoBadDog!" <no_@spam_verizon.net> wrote in message
> news:%23%23eer5lgFHA.1252@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> Norton Ghost does everything that Arconis True Image does, and more. You
>> can boot from the Norton Ghost disc, and you can recover individual files
>> from the Ghost image instead of having to do a full restore. Ghost also
>> allows you to keep multiple images and has an image browser that allows
> you
>> to track the differences. For the money, Ghost is a much better program.
>>
>> Bobby
>>
>> "usasma" <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> news:8E4D6ED9-6988-43E1-AA1F-7D2B389A9416@microsoft.com...
>> > There's basically 2 ways to backup your system.
>> >
>> > The first is to backup all of your files. MSBackup usually comes on
>> > the
>> > system that you've got and is fairly good for this purpose. I prefer
> the
>> > free version of SyncBack, and others prefer the free version of Cobian
>> > Backup
>> > (you can Google for these programs).
>> >
>> > The next option is to create an image of your hard drive. This copies
>> > everything in one big chunk - and can be used to restore your system if
> it
>> > crashes. While there are free programs that do this, I prefer Acronis
>> > True
>> > Image because it works within Windows - which most of the other
>> > programs
>> > don't. The benefit of the program is that I can reboot with the
>> > Acronis
>> > recovery CD and be back up and running within 20 minutes. The Acronis
>> > program costs about $50.
>> >
>> > I use both programs in combination to protect my files. I backup all
>> > of
>> > my
>> > data/personal files using the SyncBack program on a daily basis. I use
>> > the
>> > Acronis program to image my hard drive on a weekly basis - I save 7
> copies
>> > of
>> > it and overwrite the oldest as I go along.
>> >
>> > "John Torrie" wrote:
>> >
>> >> How do I back up my system?
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>>
>>
>
>
July 7, 2005 9:25:04 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Today my new computer with XP will be set up, replacing my old one that still
has 98SE. Three months ago I purchased a laptop with XP, but I've used it
very little--anticipatory anxiety plus a gut feeling that I should get my
desktop and laptop to have the same OS. In the past I've put thousands of
hours into trying to get a backup process in place, also suffering a crash in
which I lost almost two years worth of academic emails and documents because
I hadn't figured out how to burn discs after switching from Colorado backup
tapes.

At this time, on this 98SE machine, I have
1. Acronis (I've made twoC-drive images to a separate D-drive but never
restored)

2. Genie-Soft does weekly backups of my emails, documents and pictures to
the D-drive.

3. I have Roxio, but I've been unable to burn CDs without buffer underrun,
despite following every one of dozens of suggestions on the Internet for how
to beat it. I upgraded Roxio specifically to be able to span discs, but the
spanning never succeeded.

4. My new computer has a DVD burner, and I'm hoping the buffer problem
won't exist and I can resume making external backups.

5. I've wondered whether I should put my less-than-a-year old hard drive
(D) into my new computer and continue using it for backups. I probably will.
I've never used the Microsoft backup feature, not understanding how backup
up to the same computer could be of any help in case of a crash.


"usasma" wrote:

> There are basically 2 ways to backup your system.

> The first is to backup all of your files. MSBackup usually comes on the
> system that you've got and is fairly good for this purpose. I prefer the
> free version of SyncBack, and others prefer the free version of Cobian Backup
> (you can Google for these programs).
>
> The next option is to create an image of your hard drive. This copies
> everything in one big chunk - and can be used to restore your system if it
> crashes. While there are free programs that do this, I prefer Acronis True
> Image because it works within Windows - which most of the other programs
> don't. The benefit of the program is that I can reboot with the Acronis
> recovery CD and be back up and running within 20 minutes. The Acronis
> program costs about $50.
>
> I use both programs in combination to protect my files. I backup all of my
> data/personal files using the SyncBack program on a daily basis. I use the
> Acronis program to image my hard drive on a weekly basis - I save 7 copies of
> it and overwrite the oldest as I go along.
>
> "John Torrie" wrote:
>
> > How do I back up my system?
> >
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 12:18:06 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Thanks for all the information, now I'm really confused!
I have no idea what you people are talking about. If it's that complicated
to bacup my hard drive I better not try. Thanks for the help.
"John Torrie" <jtorrie@triad.rr.com> wrote in message
news:o gB5DDlgFHA.2904@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> How do I back up my system?
>
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 12:40:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

In news:uLhjx3ugFHA.2560@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
John Torrie <jtorrie@triad.rr.com> typed:

> Thanks for all the information, now I'm really confused!
> I have no idea what you people are talking about. If it's that
> complicated to bacup my hard drive I better not try. Thanks for
> the
> help.


You have it exactly backwards, as far as I'm concerned. It's not
that complicated to back up your drive, but you do need to think
about it and consider the choices open to you. But it *is*
complicated to try to recreate the data which you are almost
certain to sooner or later lose if you don't back it up.


--
Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
Please reply to the newsgroup


"John Torrie" <jtorrie@triad.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:o gB5DDlgFHA.2904@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> How do I back up my system?
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 1:55:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Reasonable people can disagree on the meaning of words. Here is what you
wrote:

"There is one huge difference between Norton Ghost and Acronis TrueImage and
that is the word Symantec."

FWIW, Ghost is the only Symantec software on my computer. I was a loyal user
of Norton branded programs even as they became bloated and slowed my
computer, and even though I suffered grief from Live Update. I finally threw
in the towel when it turned out that the only way to 'upgrade' NAV is to
completely remove it, a complicated and lengthy procedure.

In my experience, Ghost is very different. Perhaps I have PowerQuest to
thank?
--
Ted Zieglar
"You can do it if you try."

"Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote in message
news:%23LHLNKrgFHA.3256@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Ted you jumped the gun. I stated that I have used Ghost extensively and I
> have had images fail to load. I was not simply speaking "on principle" as
> you say.
>
> --
>
> Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
> www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
>
>
> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
> news:uLu3ozmgFHA.1244@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> > Sorry, I have to stick my nose in here...
> >
> > If you're opposed to Symantec software on principal, that's your perfect
> > right, but I don't think that's sufficient reason to dissuade the OP
from
> > trying Ghost.
> >
> > Norton Ghost, when installed from a Ghost CD, is unique among Norton
> > branded
> > software in that it does not have a large footprint, does not sink deep
> > hooks into the system and does not affect the computer's performance.
> >
> > I started using Ghost with the 2003 version (Ghost 9.0 is a nice
> > improvement) and I have never had an image restore fail. In fact, no
part
> > of
> > the program has ever failed me.
> >
> > --
> > Ted Zieglar
> > "You can do it if you try."
> >
> > "Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote in message
> > news:epYpWnmgFHA.2472@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> >> There is one huge difference between Norton Ghost and Acronis TrueImage
> > and
> >> that is the word Symantec ;-)
> >>
> >> Seriously though having used both products extensively I have never had
> >> an
> >> Acronis TrueImage restore fail however I have had Ghost fail several
> > times.
> >> BTW which version of Ghost will allow you to restore individual files
> > using
> >> the boot CD? I know that you can use the Ghost Explorer to recover
> >> individual files but so does Acronis TrueImage.
> >>
> >> --
> >>
> >> Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
> >> www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
> >>
> >>
> >> "NoNoBadDog!" <no_@spam_verizon.net> wrote in message
> >> news:%23%23eer5lgFHA.1252@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> >> > Norton Ghost does everything that Arconis True Image does, and more.
> > You
> >> > can boot from the Norton Ghost disc, and you can recover individual
> > files
> >> > from the Ghost image instead of having to do a full restore. Ghost
> >> > also
> >> > allows you to keep multiple images and has an image browser that
allows
> >> you
> >> > to track the differences. For the money, Ghost is a much better
> > program.
> >> >
> >> > Bobby
> >> >
> >> > "usasma" <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> >> > news:8E4D6ED9-6988-43E1-AA1F-7D2B389A9416@microsoft.com...
> >> > > There's basically 2 ways to backup your system.
> >> > >
> >> > > The first is to backup all of your files. MSBackup usually comes
on
> > the
> >> > > system that you've got and is fairly good for this purpose. I
prefer
> >> the
> >> > > free version of SyncBack, and others prefer the free version of
> >> > > Cobian
> >> > > Backup
> >> > > (you can Google for these programs).
> >> > >
> >> > > The next option is to create an image of your hard drive. This
> >> > > copies
> >> > > everything in one big chunk - and can be used to restore your
system
> > if
> >> it
> >> > > crashes. While there are free programs that do this, I prefer
> >> > > Acronis
> >> > > True
> >> > > Image because it works within Windows - which most of the other
> > programs
> >> > > don't. The benefit of the program is that I can reboot with the
> > Acronis
> >> > > recovery CD and be back up and running within 20 minutes. The
> >> > > Acronis
> >> > > program costs about $50.
> >> > >
> >> > > I use both programs in combination to protect my files. I backup
all
> > of
> >> > > my
> >> > > data/personal files using the SyncBack program on a daily basis. I
> > use
> >> > > the
> >> > > Acronis program to image my hard drive on a weekly basis - I save 7
> >> copies
> >> > > of
> >> > > it and overwrite the oldest as I go along.
> >> > >
> >> > > "John Torrie" wrote:
> >> > >
> >> > >> How do I back up my system?
> >> > >>
> >> > >>
> >> > >>
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 2:01:23 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Computers are very complicated devices. If it's all too confusing for you,
perhaps you should stay away from them. You'll be saving yourself a lot of
grief.
--
Ted Zieglar
"You can do it if you try."

"John Torrie" <jtorrie@triad.rr.com> wrote in message
news:uLhjx3ugFHA.2560@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Thanks for all the information, now I'm really confused!
> I have no idea what you people are talking about. If it's that complicated
> to bacup my hard drive I better not try. Thanks for the help.
> "John Torrie" <jtorrie@triad.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:o gB5DDlgFHA.2904@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > How do I back up my system?
> >
>
>
July 7, 2005 2:49:35 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

On Wed, 6 Jul 2005 13:36:14 -0600, Harry Ohrn wrote:

> 1) The first is a data backup. I run it as a scheduled event daily and
> create a backup of my important data such as the My Documents folder and my
> Outlook Express store. One can use the MS Backup program that is installed
> if you have XP Pro but needs to be installed manually if you have XP Home -
> see here http://www.onecomputerguy.com/windowsxp_tips.htm#backup...

Using Media (XP Pro) and didn't know there was anything called
NTBACKUP to run! That's comforting. I think I'll debug my computer
and do it ASAP.
July 7, 2005 2:58:13 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

If you have the Media Edition or XP Pro, go to Start > Run and type in
NTBACKUP. If you have XP Home, go to this page for instructions:
http://www.onecomputerguy.com/windowsxp_tips.htm#backup...
That will give you time to digest the information people have given
you.

Up to this thread, I thought Norton Ghost was the only way to go, now
I know there are acceptable free programs out there too. The one
thing I would never do again is get mixed up with a Symantic product
of any kind. Symantic causes more trouble than it solves for me.

``````````````````````

On Thu, 7 Jul 2005 08:18:06 -0400, John Torrie wrote:

> Thanks for all the information, now I'm really confused!
> I have no idea what you people are talking about. If it's that complicated
> to bacup my hard drive I better not try. Thanks for the help.
> "John Torrie" <jtorrie@triad.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:o gB5DDlgFHA.2904@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > How do I back up my system?
> >
>
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 11:34:28 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Ted why did you fail to include the winking smilie when you quoted me?

--

Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


"Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
news:%23MunYtvgFHA.2896@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Reasonable people can disagree on the meaning of words. Here is what you
> wrote:
>
> "There is one huge difference between Norton Ghost and Acronis TrueImage
> and
> that is the word Symantec."
>
> FWIW, Ghost is the only Symantec software on my computer. I was a loyal
> user
> of Norton branded programs even as they became bloated and slowed my
> computer, and even though I suffered grief from Live Update. I finally
> threw
> in the towel when it turned out that the only way to 'upgrade' NAV is to
> completely remove it, a complicated and lengthy procedure.
>
> In my experience, Ghost is very different. Perhaps I have PowerQuest to
> thank?
> --
> Ted Zieglar
> "You can do it if you try."
>
> "Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote in message
> news:%23LHLNKrgFHA.3256@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> Ted you jumped the gun. I stated that I have used Ghost extensively and I
>> have had images fail to load. I was not simply speaking "on principle" as
>> you say.
>>
>> --
>>
>> Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
>> www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
>>
>>
>> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:uLu3ozmgFHA.1244@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> > Sorry, I have to stick my nose in here...
>> >
>> > If you're opposed to Symantec software on principal, that's your
>> > perfect
>> > right, but I don't think that's sufficient reason to dissuade the OP
> from
>> > trying Ghost.
>> >
>> > Norton Ghost, when installed from a Ghost CD, is unique among Norton
>> > branded
>> > software in that it does not have a large footprint, does not sink deep
>> > hooks into the system and does not affect the computer's performance.
>> >
>> > I started using Ghost with the 2003 version (Ghost 9.0 is a nice
>> > improvement) and I have never had an image restore fail. In fact, no
> part
>> > of
>> > the program has ever failed me.
>> >
>> > --
>> > Ted Zieglar
>> > "You can do it if you try."
>> >
>> > "Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote in message
>> > news:epYpWnmgFHA.2472@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> >> There is one huge difference between Norton Ghost and Acronis
>> >> TrueImage
>> > and
>> >> that is the word Symantec ;-)
>> >>
>> >> Seriously though having used both products extensively I have never
>> >> had
>> >> an
>> >> Acronis TrueImage restore fail however I have had Ghost fail several
>> > times.
>> >> BTW which version of Ghost will allow you to restore individual files
>> > using
>> >> the boot CD? I know that you can use the Ghost Explorer to recover
>> >> individual files but so does Acronis TrueImage.
>> >>
>> >> --
>> >>
>> >> Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
>> >> www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> "NoNoBadDog!" <no_@spam_verizon.net> wrote in message
>> >> news:%23%23eer5lgFHA.1252@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> >> > Norton Ghost does everything that Arconis True Image does, and more.
>> > You
>> >> > can boot from the Norton Ghost disc, and you can recover individual
>> > files
>> >> > from the Ghost image instead of having to do a full restore. Ghost
>> >> > also
>> >> > allows you to keep multiple images and has an image browser that
> allows
>> >> you
>> >> > to track the differences. For the money, Ghost is a much better
>> > program.
>> >> >
>> >> > Bobby
>> >> >
>> >> > "usasma" <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> >> > news:8E4D6ED9-6988-43E1-AA1F-7D2B389A9416@microsoft.com...
>> >> > > There's basically 2 ways to backup your system.
>> >> > >
>> >> > > The first is to backup all of your files. MSBackup usually comes
> on
>> > the
>> >> > > system that you've got and is fairly good for this purpose. I
> prefer
>> >> the
>> >> > > free version of SyncBack, and others prefer the free version of
>> >> > > Cobian
>> >> > > Backup
>> >> > > (you can Google for these programs).
>> >> > >
>> >> > > The next option is to create an image of your hard drive. This
>> >> > > copies
>> >> > > everything in one big chunk - and can be used to restore your
> system
>> > if
>> >> it
>> >> > > crashes. While there are free programs that do this, I prefer
>> >> > > Acronis
>> >> > > True
>> >> > > Image because it works within Windows - which most of the other
>> > programs
>> >> > > don't. The benefit of the program is that I can reboot with the
>> > Acronis
>> >> > > recovery CD and be back up and running within 20 minutes. The
>> >> > > Acronis
>> >> > > program costs about $50.
>> >> > >
>> >> > > I use both programs in combination to protect my files. I backup
> all
>> > of
>> >> > > my
>> >> > > data/personal files using the SyncBack program on a daily basis.
>> >> > > I
>> > use
>> >> > > the
>> >> > > Acronis program to image my hard drive on a weekly basis - I save
>> >> > > 7
>> >> copies
>> >> > > of
>> >> > > it and overwrite the oldest as I go along.
>> >> > >
>> >> > > "John Torrie" wrote:
>> >> > >
>> >> > >> How do I back up my system?
>> >> > >>
>> >> > >>
>> >> > >>
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >>
>> >>
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 11:35:54 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Thanks Richard. That is an improvement over previous versions of Ghost and
is also an advantage over TI.

--

Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


"Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:o yruePqgFHA.3296@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Hi Harry,
>
> Because I wanted to be certain of my answer, I just booted my computer
> with both True Image 8 CD and with Ghost 9 CD.
>
> The Ghost 9 CD "does" allow you to restore individual files from an image
> you have created. It's image explorer is fully functional under the
> recovery environment. Thus you can replace ntldr when it goes missing etc.
> It also allows you to edit partition tables (a huge plus when a
> drive/partition shows as RAW - if you know what you are doing).
>
> True Image only allows a full restore under their recovery environment.
>
> Hope this helps (-:
>
> --
> Regards,
>
> Richard Urban
>
> If you knew as much as you thought you know,
> You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!
>
>
> "Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote in message
> news:epYpWnmgFHA.2472@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> There is one huge difference between Norton Ghost and Acronis TrueImage
>> and
>> that is the word Symantec ;-)
>>
>> Seriously though having used both products extensively I have never had
>> an
>> Acronis TrueImage restore fail however I have had Ghost fail several
>> times.
>> BTW which version of Ghost will allow you to restore individual files
>> using
>> the boot CD? I know that you can use the Ghost Explorer to recover
>> individual files but so does Acronis TrueImage.
>>
>> --
>>
>> Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
>> www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
>>
>>
>> "NoNoBadDog!" <no_@spam_verizon.net> wrote in message
>> news:%23%23eer5lgFHA.1252@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>>> Norton Ghost does everything that Arconis True Image does, and more.
>>> You
>>> can boot from the Norton Ghost disc, and you can recover individual
>>> files
>>> from the Ghost image instead of having to do a full restore. Ghost also
>>> allows you to keep multiple images and has an image browser that allows
>> you
>>> to track the differences. For the money, Ghost is a much better
>>> program.
>>>
>>> Bobby
>>>
>>> "usasma" <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>>> news:8E4D6ED9-6988-43E1-AA1F-7D2B389A9416@microsoft.com...
>>> > There's basically 2 ways to backup your system.
>>> >
>>> > The first is to backup all of your files. MSBackup usually comes on
>>> > the
>>> > system that you've got and is fairly good for this purpose. I prefer
>> the
>>> > free version of SyncBack, and others prefer the free version of Cobian
>>> > Backup
>>> > (you can Google for these programs).
>>> >
>>> > The next option is to create an image of your hard drive. This copies
>>> > everything in one big chunk - and can be used to restore your system
>>> > if
>> it
>>> > crashes. While there are free programs that do this, I prefer Acronis
>>> > True
>>> > Image because it works within Windows - which most of the other
>>> > programs
>>> > don't. The benefit of the program is that I can reboot with the
>>> > Acronis
>>> > recovery CD and be back up and running within 20 minutes. The Acronis
>>> > program costs about $50.
>>> >
>>> > I use both programs in combination to protect my files. I backup all
>>> > of
>>> > my
>>> > data/personal files using the SyncBack program on a daily basis. I
>>> > use
>>> > the
>>> > Acronis program to image my hard drive on a weekly basis - I save 7
>> copies
>>> > of
>>> > it and overwrite the oldest as I go along.
>>> >
>>> > "John Torrie" wrote:
>>> >
>>> >> How do I back up my system?
>>> >>
>>> >>
>>> >>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
July 7, 2005 11:40:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

LOL. It depends on if you want to have a backup that is there for you when
you need it. If your computer is stolen, damaged by fire or water and you've
simply stored your backup on the computer then you've lost it. However if
your data isn't really important then do as you wish.
--

Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


"John Torrie" <jtorrie@triad.rr.com> wrote in message
news:uLhjx3ugFHA.2560@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Thanks for all the information, now I'm really confused!
> I have no idea what you people are talking about. If it's that complicated
> to bacup my hard drive I better not try. Thanks for the help.
> "John Torrie" <jtorrie@triad.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:o gB5DDlgFHA.2904@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> How do I back up my system?
>>
>
>
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 1:34:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Harry: To show that no harm or hard feelings were intended, here is a parade
of winking smilies:

;-> ;-> ;-> ;-> ;-> ;-> ;-> ;->
--
Ted Zieglar
"You can do it if you try."

"Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote in message
news:o Sh9701gFHA.2484@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Ted why did you fail to include the winking smilie when you quoted me?
>
> --
>
> Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
> www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
>
>
> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
> news:%23MunYtvgFHA.2896@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > Reasonable people can disagree on the meaning of words. Here is what you
> > wrote:
> >
> > "There is one huge difference between Norton Ghost and Acronis TrueImage
> > and
> > that is the word Symantec."
> >
> > FWIW, Ghost is the only Symantec software on my computer. I was a loyal
> > user
> > of Norton branded programs even as they became bloated and slowed my
> > computer, and even though I suffered grief from Live Update. I finally
> > threw
> > in the towel when it turned out that the only way to 'upgrade' NAV is to
> > completely remove it, a complicated and lengthy procedure.
> >
> > In my experience, Ghost is very different. Perhaps I have PowerQuest to
> > thank?
> > --
> > Ted Zieglar
> > "You can do it if you try."
> >
> > "Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote in message
> > news:%23LHLNKrgFHA.3256@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> >> Ted you jumped the gun. I stated that I have used Ghost extensively and
I
> >> have had images fail to load. I was not simply speaking "on principle"
as
> >> you say.
> >>
> >> --
> >>
> >> Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
> >> www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
> >>
> >>
> >> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
> >> news:uLu3ozmgFHA.1244@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> >> > Sorry, I have to stick my nose in here...
> >> >
> >> > If you're opposed to Symantec software on principal, that's your
> >> > perfect
> >> > right, but I don't think that's sufficient reason to dissuade the OP
> > from
> >> > trying Ghost.
> >> >
> >> > Norton Ghost, when installed from a Ghost CD, is unique among Norton
> >> > branded
> >> > software in that it does not have a large footprint, does not sink
deep
> >> > hooks into the system and does not affect the computer's performance.
> >> >
> >> > I started using Ghost with the 2003 version (Ghost 9.0 is a nice
> >> > improvement) and I have never had an image restore fail. In fact, no
> > part
> >> > of
> >> > the program has ever failed me.
> >> >
> >> > --
> >> > Ted Zieglar
> >> > "You can do it if you try."
> >> >
> >> > "Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote in message
> >> > news:epYpWnmgFHA.2472@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> >> >> There is one huge difference between Norton Ghost and Acronis
> >> >> TrueImage
> >> > and
> >> >> that is the word Symantec ;-)
> >> >>
> >> >> Seriously though having used both products extensively I have never
> >> >> had
> >> >> an
> >> >> Acronis TrueImage restore fail however I have had Ghost fail several
> >> > times.
> >> >> BTW which version of Ghost will allow you to restore individual
files
> >> > using
> >> >> the boot CD? I know that you can use the Ghost Explorer to recover
> >> >> individual files but so does Acronis TrueImage.
> >> >>
> >> >> --
> >> >>
> >> >> Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
> >> >> www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >> "NoNoBadDog!" <no_@spam_verizon.net> wrote in message
> >> >> news:%23%23eer5lgFHA.1252@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> >> >> > Norton Ghost does everything that Arconis True Image does, and
more.
> >> > You
> >> >> > can boot from the Norton Ghost disc, and you can recover
individual
> >> > files
> >> >> > from the Ghost image instead of having to do a full restore.
Ghost
> >> >> > also
> >> >> > allows you to keep multiple images and has an image browser that
> > allows
> >> >> you
> >> >> > to track the differences. For the money, Ghost is a much better
> >> > program.
> >> >> >
> >> >> > Bobby
> >> >> >
> >> >> > "usasma" <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> >> >> > news:8E4D6ED9-6988-43E1-AA1F-7D2B389A9416@microsoft.com...
> >> >> > > There's basically 2 ways to backup your system.
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > > The first is to backup all of your files. MSBackup usually
comes
> > on
> >> > the
> >> >> > > system that you've got and is fairly good for this purpose. I
> > prefer
> >> >> the
> >> >> > > free version of SyncBack, and others prefer the free version of
> >> >> > > Cobian
> >> >> > > Backup
> >> >> > > (you can Google for these programs).
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > > The next option is to create an image of your hard drive. This
> >> >> > > copies
> >> >> > > everything in one big chunk - and can be used to restore your
> > system
> >> > if
> >> >> it
> >> >> > > crashes. While there are free programs that do this, I prefer
> >> >> > > Acronis
> >> >> > > True
> >> >> > > Image because it works within Windows - which most of the other
> >> > programs
> >> >> > > don't. The benefit of the program is that I can reboot with the
> >> > Acronis
> >> >> > > recovery CD and be back up and running within 20 minutes. The
> >> >> > > Acronis
> >> >> > > program costs about $50.
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > > I use both programs in combination to protect my files. I
backup
> > all
> >> > of
> >> >> > > my
> >> >> > > data/personal files using the SyncBack program on a daily basis.
> >> >> > > I
> >> > use
> >> >> > > the
> >> >> > > Acronis program to image my hard drive on a weekly basis - I
save
> >> >> > > 7
> >> >> copies
> >> >> > > of
> >> >> > > it and overwrite the oldest as I go along.
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > > "John Torrie" wrote:
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > >> How do I back up my system?
> >> >> > >>
> >> >> > >>
> >> >> > >>
> >> >> >
> >> >> >
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 3:54:36 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

:-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-)

--

Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


"Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
news:u2yPvG8gFHA.1948@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Harry: To show that no harm or hard feelings were intended, here is a
parade
> of winking smilies:
>
> ;-> ;-> ;-> ;-> ;-> ;-> ;-> ;->
> --
> Ted Zieglar
> "You can do it if you try."
>
> "Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote in message
> news:o Sh9701gFHA.2484@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > Ted why did you fail to include the winking smilie when you quoted me?
> >
> > --
> >
> > Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
> > www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
> >
> >
> > "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:%23MunYtvgFHA.2896@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > > Reasonable people can disagree on the meaning of words. Here is what
you
> > > wrote:
> > >
> > > "There is one huge difference between Norton Ghost and Acronis
TrueImage
> > > and
> > > that is the word Symantec."
> > >
> > > FWIW, Ghost is the only Symantec software on my computer. I was a
loyal
> > > user
> > > of Norton branded programs even as they became bloated and slowed my
> > > computer, and even though I suffered grief from Live Update. I finally
> > > threw
> > > in the towel when it turned out that the only way to 'upgrade' NAV is
to
> > > completely remove it, a complicated and lengthy procedure.
> > >
> > > In my experience, Ghost is very different. Perhaps I have PowerQuest
to
> > > thank?
> > > --
> > > Ted Zieglar
> > > "You can do it if you try."
> > >
> > > "Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote in message
> > > news:%23LHLNKrgFHA.3256@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > >> Ted you jumped the gun. I stated that I have used Ghost extensively
and
> I
> > >> have had images fail to load. I was not simply speaking "on
principle"
> as
> > >> you say.
> > >>
> > >> --
> > >>
> > >> Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
> > >> www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
> > >> news:uLu3ozmgFHA.1244@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> > >> > Sorry, I have to stick my nose in here...
> > >> >
> > >> > If you're opposed to Symantec software on principal, that's your
> > >> > perfect
> > >> > right, but I don't think that's sufficient reason to dissuade the
OP
> > > from
> > >> > trying Ghost.
> > >> >
> > >> > Norton Ghost, when installed from a Ghost CD, is unique among
Norton
> > >> > branded
> > >> > software in that it does not have a large footprint, does not sink
> deep
> > >> > hooks into the system and does not affect the computer's
performance.
> > >> >
> > >> > I started using Ghost with the 2003 version (Ghost 9.0 is a nice
> > >> > improvement) and I have never had an image restore fail. In fact,
no
> > > part
> > >> > of
> > >> > the program has ever failed me.
> > >> >
> > >> > --
> > >> > Ted Zieglar
> > >> > "You can do it if you try."
> > >> >
> > >> > "Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote in message
> > >> > news:epYpWnmgFHA.2472@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > >> >> There is one huge difference between Norton Ghost and Acronis
> > >> >> TrueImage
> > >> > and
> > >> >> that is the word Symantec ;-)
> > >> >>
> > >> >> Seriously though having used both products extensively I have
never
> > >> >> had
> > >> >> an
> > >> >> Acronis TrueImage restore fail however I have had Ghost fail
several
> > >> > times.
> > >> >> BTW which version of Ghost will allow you to restore individual
> files
> > >> > using
> > >> >> the boot CD? I know that you can use the Ghost Explorer to recover
> > >> >> individual files but so does Acronis TrueImage.
> > >> >>
> > >> >> --
> > >> >>
> > >> >> Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
> > >> >> www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
> > >> >>
> > >> >>
> > >> >> "NoNoBadDog!" <no_@spam_verizon.net> wrote in message
> > >> >> news:%23%23eer5lgFHA.1252@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > >> >> > Norton Ghost does everything that Arconis True Image does, and
> more.
> > >> > You
> > >> >> > can boot from the Norton Ghost disc, and you can recover
> individual
> > >> > files
> > >> >> > from the Ghost image instead of having to do a full restore.
> Ghost
> > >> >> > also
> > >> >> > allows you to keep multiple images and has an image browser that
> > > allows
> > >> >> you
> > >> >> > to track the differences. For the money, Ghost is a much better
> > >> > program.
> > >> >> >
> > >> >> > Bobby
> > >> >> >
> > >> >> > "usasma" <usasma@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> > >> >> > news:8E4D6ED9-6988-43E1-AA1F-7D2B389A9416@microsoft.com...
> > >> >> > > There's basically 2 ways to backup your system.
> > >> >> > >
> > >> >> > > The first is to backup all of your files. MSBackup usually
> comes
> > > on
> > >> > the
> > >> >> > > system that you've got and is fairly good for this purpose. I
> > > prefer
> > >> >> the
> > >> >> > > free version of SyncBack, and others prefer the free version
of
> > >> >> > > Cobian
> > >> >> > > Backup
> > >> >> > > (you can Google for these programs).
> > >> >> > >
> > >> >> > > The next option is to create an image of your hard drive.
This
> > >> >> > > copies
> > >> >> > > everything in one big chunk - and can be used to restore your
> > > system
> > >> > if
> > >> >> it
> > >> >> > > crashes. While there are free programs that do this, I prefer
> > >> >> > > Acronis
> > >> >> > > True
> > >> >> > > Image because it works within Windows - which most of the
other
> > >> > programs
> > >> >> > > don't. The benefit of the program is that I can reboot with
the
> > >> > Acronis
> > >> >> > > recovery CD and be back up and running within 20 minutes. The
> > >> >> > > Acronis
> > >> >> > > program costs about $50.
> > >> >> > >
> > >> >> > > I use both programs in combination to protect my files. I
> backup
> > > all
> > >> > of
> > >> >> > > my
> > >> >> > > data/personal files using the SyncBack program on a daily
basis.
> > >> >> > > I
> > >> > use
> > >> >> > > the
> > >> >> > > Acronis program to image my hard drive on a weekly basis - I
> save
> > >> >> > > 7
> > >> >> copies
> > >> >> > > of
> > >> >> > > it and overwrite the oldest as I go along.
> > >> >> > >
> > >> >> > > "John Torrie" wrote:
> > >> >> > >
> > >> >> > >> How do I back up my system?
> > >> >> > >>
> > >> >> > >>
> > >> >> > >>
> > >> >> >
> > >> >> >
> > >> >>
> > >> >>
> > >> >
> > >> >
> > >>
> > >>
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
!