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Linksys WRT54G - SMA or TNC connectors

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Does Linksys use any sort of naming convention to determine which of the
aforementioned connectors they use for their antenna connections on the
WRT54G? I need to order a router and hi-gain antennas, but it seems there's
no way of knowing -- aside from having the router in hand -- which
connectors it ships with. Thanks.

Robert
9 answers Last reply
More about linksys wrt54g connectors
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Oops...disregard. Linksys does in fact specify which antenna work with which
    routers.

    "rjsalvi" <rjsalvi@nospamambianceacoustics.com> wrote in message
    news:4j82d.7759$XW.3791@twister.socal.rr.com...
    > Does Linksys use any sort of naming convention to determine which of the
    > aforementioned connectors they use for their antenna connections on the
    > WRT54G? I need to order a router and hi-gain antennas, but it seems
    there's
    > no way of knowing -- aside from having the router in hand -- which
    > connectors it ships with. Thanks.
    >
    > Robert
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Thu, 16 Sep 2004 04:06:24 GMT, "rjsalvi"
    <rjsalvi@nospamambianceacoustics.com> wrote:

    >Does Linksys use any sort of naming convention to determine which of the
    >aforementioned connectors they use for their antenna connections on the
    >WRT54G? I need to order a router and hi-gain antennas, but it seems there's
    >no way of knowing -- aside from having the router in hand -- which
    >connectors it ships with. Thanks.

    Linksys uses R-TNC (reverse polarity TNC) connectors.
    DLink uses R-SMA (reverse polarity SMA) connectors.

    The reason for the odd connectors is that the FCC decided to
    "discourage" users from attaching external antennas and demanded that
    manufacturers use weird and proprietary connectors.

    Most (not all) large antennas use Type-N connectors.
    The smaller antennas tend to use SMA and TNC.
    A few smaller antennas have MCX or other connectors designed to
    interface directly with a PCMCIA card at the end of coax pigtails.

    See:
    http://www.hyperlinktech.com/web/connectors.php
    for photos of typical connectors found in wireless.

    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
    news:4gejk05q6m4kckku48s3m235t4mgi9p5n2@4ax.com...
    > On Thu, 16 Sep 2004 04:06:24 GMT, "rjsalvi"
    > <rjsalvi@nospamambianceacoustics.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Does Linksys use any sort of naming convention to determine which of the
    > >aforementioned connectors they use for their antenna connections on the
    > >WRT54G? I need to order a router and hi-gain antennas, but it seems
    there's
    > >no way of knowing -- aside from having the router in hand -- which
    > >connectors it ships with. Thanks.
    >
    > Linksys uses R-TNC (reverse polarity TNC) connectors.
    > DLink uses R-SMA (reverse polarity SMA) connectors.
    >
    > The reason for the odd connectors is that the FCC decided to
    > "discourage" users from attaching external antennas and demanded that
    > manufacturers use weird and proprietary connectors.
    >
    > Most (not all) large antennas use Type-N connectors.
    > The smaller antennas tend to use SMA and TNC.
    > A few smaller antennas have MCX or other connectors designed to
    > interface directly with a PCMCIA card at the end of coax pigtails.
    >
    > See:
    > http://www.hyperlinktech.com/web/connectors.php
    > for photos of typical connectors found in wireless.

    Thanks Jeff.

    Robert
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    However, antenna makers such as Hawking Technology provide for
    connector adaptors/convertors that allow a user to connect high-gain
    antennas to different types of wireless devices. Thus, what was
    accomplished by the FCC other than to add a little bit to
    manufacturing costs that is passed on to users. Other than additional
    manufacturing costs, the end result is the same as if there were a
    universal connector.

    John


    Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message news:<4gejk05q6m4kckku48s3m235t4mgi9p5n2@4ax.com>...
    > On Thu, 16 Sep 2004 04:06:24 GMT, "rjsalvi"
    > <rjsalvi@nospamambianceacoustics.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Does Linksys use any sort of naming convention to determine which of the
    > >aforementioned connectors they use for their antenna connections on the
    > >WRT54G? I need to order a router and hi-gain antennas, but it seems there's
    > >no way of knowing -- aside from having the router in hand -- which
    > >connectors it ships with. Thanks.
    >
    > Linksys uses R-TNC (reverse polarity TNC) connectors.
    > DLink uses R-SMA (reverse polarity SMA) connectors.
    >
    > The reason for the odd connectors is that the FCC decided to
    > "discourage" users from attaching external antennas and demanded that
    > manufacturers use weird and proprietary connectors.
    >
    > Most (not all) large antennas use Type-N connectors.
    > The smaller antennas tend to use SMA and TNC.
    > A few smaller antennas have MCX or other connectors designed to
    > interface directly with a PCMCIA card at the end of coax pigtails.
    >
    > See:
    > http://www.hyperlinktech.com/web/connectors.php
    > for photos of typical connectors found in wireless.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    John Mason <jomason@cba.ua.edu> wrote:
    > However, antenna makers such as Hawking Technology provide for
    > connector adaptors/convertors that allow a user to connect high-gain
    > antennas to different types of wireless devices. Thus, what was
    > accomplished by the FCC other than to add a little bit to
    > manufacturing costs that is passed on to users. Other than additional
    > manufacturing costs, the end result is the same as if there were a
    > universal connector.

    The security through obscurity worked about as well here as it does in any
    other environment.

    Does Hawking really have an array of adapters? I don't see that. I see
    that they come with one connector and one adapter, giving you the broad
    coverage of two types. They mutter something about "most", but it's two.

    http://www.pacwireless.com/products/accessories.shtml
    has some "adapters" like the old days. A little chunk of metal.
    http://www.hyperlinktech.com/web/cable_radio_pigtails_list.php
    has some pigtails. I sent them a scanned image because I couldn't figure
    out what I had, and they sold me the right cable. They also have closeup
    views of everything, so you should be able to figure it out.
    http://www.fab-corp.com/ has pigtails as well.

    ---
    Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 16:46:59 +0000 (UTC),
    dold@XReXXLinks.usenet.us.com wrote:

    >The security through obscurity worked about as well here as it does in any
    >other environment.

    When the FCC discovered that users were attaching "foreign" devices to
    their FCC type accepted equipment, they immediately proposed a rule
    that required permanently affixed, non-removeable antennas, or totally
    proprietary, not available to the great unwashed masses, types of
    connectors. According the letter of the rules-n-regs, a wireless
    system must be type accepted as a complete system, which includes
    radio, antenna, coax, amplifier, whatever. Interchangeable components
    are not acceptable. After a very short review process, the FCC caved
    in to the obvious problem that goofy connectors would seriously impact
    the cost of the products. This is what happens when attorneys make
    the FCC rules instead of engineers.

    A better assortement of adapters:
    http://www.sky2web.net/adapters.html
    which are MUCH cheaper than pigtails, but not as flexible (bendable).

    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
  7. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
    > A better assortement of adapters:
    > http://www.sky2web.net/adapters.html
    > which are MUCH cheaper than pigtails, but not as flexible (bendable).

    Six?
    http://www.pacwireless.com/products/accessories.shtml
    that I mentioned has ten. Better? dunno.
    Actually, that points to http://www.rangeextender.com/adapters.html when
    you click on the "buy" button.

    I think I'd be inclined to add some additional support to an adapter taking
    a panel mount rp-sma to N. That adapter seems like it would be heavier
    on its own than the rp-sma could tolerate supporting, not counting the
    cable that one might have on the N connector.

    --
    ---
    Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
  8. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 20:15:28 +0000 (UTC),
    dold@XReXXLinks.usenet.us.com wrote:

    >Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
    >> A better assortement of adapters:
    >> http://www.sky2web.net/adapters.html
    >> which are MUCH cheaper than pigtails, but not as flexible (bendable).

    >Six?
    >http://www.pacwireless.com/products/accessories.shtml
    >that I mentioned has ten. Better? dunno.
    >Actually, that points to http://www.rangeextender.com/adapters.html when
    >you click on the "buy" button.

    Ooooh. Cheaper adapters. Thanks.

    There are well more than 6 adapters in my war chest. The box has
    about 15 lbs of assorted adapters and connectors for various nefarious
    purposes. Every time I go on an install (or ham radio field day), a
    large number of adapters mysteriously evaporate. It's a good idea to
    have a large collection. The 6 adapters do not cover everything. I
    just ran into a reverse-N connector today. I'd never seen one of
    those, and of course, had no adapter. In general, I try to bring
    everything to an ordinary N-connector and then adapt from there. It's
    often easier to use two adapters than to stock every possible
    combination just to be able to use one adapter.

    >I think I'd be inclined to add some additional support to an adapter taking
    >a panel mount rp-sma to N. That adapter seems like it would be heavier
    >on its own than the rp-sma could tolerate supporting, not counting the
    >cable that one might have on the N connector.

    Maybe. The last SMA to N adapter I tried to destroy resulted in the
    SMA panel mount connector ripping out of the plastic panel. The
    adapter survived. Methinks reinforcing the panel with a very big
    washer might be a better idea.

    --
    # Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
    # 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    # jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    # 831.421.6491 digital_pager jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
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