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Any tips in setting up 1 mile WiFi connection with Senao b..

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September 19, 2004 12:07:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Just purchased two 14Dbi Yagi's (Antenex) and Senao SL-2511 BG1 Plus
Long Range Wireless Multi-client Bridge to connect a friend to my lan 1
mile away - line-of-sight. (I'm on a hill).

I want to put the Senao at his house and use and old Cisco Aironet
AP-340 at my house. (I wonder if the 30 MW from the AP will be able to
reach him??? Otherwise, I guess I buy another Senao?)

When I set up the Senao in my home, I get the WLAN link light on (after
configging SSID (No WEP, yet) BUT I CAN'T GET DHCP WORKING through the
Senao. Any tips here? The single laptop connected to the Senao just
can't get an IP address allocated. Even If I force an address on,
(Windows XP) I can't get any pings through to anywhere on on my LAN.

Any suggestions for getting the Senao configured properly? And what are
your thoughts about using my old Cisco Aironet 340 AP at my house to
connect to the 14.5Dbi Yagi.

Thanks very much?

-Andrew
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 19, 2004 3:35:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 08:07:15 -0700, Andrew <award@cisco.com> wrote:

>Just purchased two 14Dbi Yagi's (Antenex) and Senao SL-2511 BG1 Plus
>Long Range Wireless Multi-client Bridge to connect a friend to my lan 1
>mile away - line-of-sight. (I'm on a hill).
>
>I want to put the Senao at his house and use and old Cisco Aironet
>AP-340 at my house. (I wonder if the 30 MW from the AP will be able to
>reach him??? Otherwise, I guess I buy another Senao?)

Well, do the math and calculate the fade margin. What you're looking
for is an absolute minimum of 10dB fade margin. Do it both directions
because you have radically different xmit power on each end of the
link. Go unto:
http://www.ydi.com/calculation/som.php
Your Cisco belches about +14dBm. I'll assume you don't want it on the
roof and have about 25ft of LMR-400 for a loss of about 4dB (including
connectors and pigtail) at each end. I get 12.8dB fade margin, which
is about the minimum acceptable level. That means that you should
probably make an effort to reduce the losses, raise the power, or use
a bigger (+24dBi dish) antenna.

The Senao card comes in two flavours (+20dBm and +23dBm) so your fade
margin in the other direction will be 6 to 9dB better.

>When I set up the Senao in my home, I get the WLAN link light on (after
>configging SSID (No WEP, yet) BUT I CAN'T GET DHCP WORKING through the
>Senao. Any tips here?

Nope. Absolutely no tips, hints, clues, or help delivered without a
disclosure as to what operating system you're working with.

>The single laptop connected to the Senao just
>can't get an IP address allocated. Even If I force an address on,
>(Windows XP) I can't get any pings through to anywhere on on my LAN.

Which exact model Cisco 340? Some have MAC address filtering which
will prevent association until you enter the MAC address of the Senao
card or disable the feature. I should point out that the 340 series
access points do not have an internal DHCP server. That would need to
be supplied by a cable/dsl/modem router/firewall/dhcp-server box or
server. If you have broadcast passthru disabled in your 340 access
point, DCHP requests will not work through the access point.

Try static IP's on the Senao end first. When that works, then
troubleshoot the DCHP problem.

>Any suggestions for getting the Senao configured properly? And what are
>your thoughts about using my old Cisco Aironet 340 AP at my house to
>connect to the 14.5Dbi Yagi.

Well, lacking any specific information about the operating system,
setup, topology, hardware, and current state of the hardware, methinks
specific help would be difficult. It would largely depend upon
whether the Cisco 340 access point is currently working with other
wireless devices. If that's the case, the problem is with the Senao
installation, configuration, operating system, or device.

Perhaps the Cisco wireless access point install and FAQ would be
helpful:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps458/p...
http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/102/wlan/ap-faq.html

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
September 19, 2004 9:31:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Thanks Jeff. Responses in-line.



Jeff Liebermann wrote:
> On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 08:07:15 -0700, Andrew <award@cisco.com> wrote:
>
>
>>Just purchased two 14Dbi Yagi's (Antenex) and Senao SL-2511 BG1 Plus
>>Long Range Wireless Multi-client Bridge to connect a friend to my lan 1
>>mile away - line-of-sight. (I'm on a hill).
>>
>>I want to put the Senao at his house and use and old Cisco Aironet
>>AP-340 at my house. (I wonder if the 30 MW from the AP will be able to
>>reach him??? Otherwise, I guess I buy another Senao?)
>
>
> Well, do the math and calculate the fade margin. What you're looking
> for is an absolute minimum of 10dB fade margin. Do it both directions
> because you have radically different xmit power on each end of the
> link. Go unto:
> http://www.ydi.com/calculation/som.php
> Your Cisco belches about +14dBm. I'll assume you don't want it on the
> roof and have about 25ft of LMR-400 for a loss of about 4dB (including
> connectors and pigtail) at each end.

Actually I AM going to house the thing in a Box 10' below the antenna
mast... May as well. I really am never going to need to fuss with it.
;-) I have some RG8 with N connectors (I will install one in the AP340,
although I wish I didn't have to hack up the little wire connector /
antenna in there now.)

I get 12.8dB fade margin, which
> is about the minimum acceptable level. That means that you should
> probably make an effort to reduce the losses, raise the power, or use
> a bigger (+24dBi dish) antenna.

OK, I'll be ready to replace this if it doesn't work.
>
> The Senao card comes in two flavours (+20dBm and +23dBm) so your fade
> margin in the other direction will be 6 to 9dB better.
>
I have the 200 mW version.

>
>>When I set up the Senao in my home, I get the WLAN link light on (after
>>configging SSID (No WEP, yet) BUT I CAN'T GET DHCP WORKING through the
>>Senao. Any tips here?
>
>
> Nope. Absolutely no tips, hints, clues, or help delivered without a
> disclosure as to what operating system you're working with.

XP Pro. ;-) NO SP-2 (yet, anyway)

>
>>The single laptop connected to the Senao just
>>can't get an IP address allocated. Even If I force an address on,
>>(Windows XP) I can't get any pings through to anywhere on on my LAN.
>
>
> Which exact model Cisco 340?

AIR-AP341S1C AIR-US

Some have MAC address filtering which
> will prevent association until you enter the MAC address of the Senao
> card or disable the feature. I should point out that the 340 series
> access points do not have an internal DHCP server.

Right. I am counting on another router within my infrastructure to dole
out The IP addresses.

That would need to
> be supplied by a cable/dsl/modem router/firewall/dhcp-server box or
> server. If you have broadcast passthru disabled in your 340 access
> point, DCHP requests will not work through the access point.

I'll check
BUT I CAN connect directly with my laptop through this AP. And it gives
out my router/firewall's appropriate DHCP'd address.

>
> Try static IP's on the Senao end first. When that works, then
> troubleshoot the DCHP problem.

There are two modes the Senao cna operate in. Which one is preferred?

>
>>Any suggestions for getting the Senao configured properly? And what are
>>your thoughts about using my old Cisco Aironet 340 AP at my house to
>>connect to the 14.5Dbi Yagi.
>
>
> Well, lacking any specific information about the operating system,
> setup, topology, hardware, and current state of the hardware, methinks
> specific help would be difficult. It would largely depend upon
> whether the Cisco 340 access point is currently working with other
> wireless devices. If that's the case, the problem is with the Senao
> installation, configuration, operating system, or device.
>
> Perhaps the Cisco wireless access point install and FAQ would be
> helpful:

Pretty sure the Cisco AP is configged' properly, since I can attach with
my laptop through it.

>
> http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps458/p...
> http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/102/wlan/ap-faq.html
>

Thanks

Any input greatly appreciated.


-Andrew
Related resources
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 19, 2004 10:20:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 17:31:15 -0700, Andrew <award@cisco.com> wrote:

>Actually I AM going to house the thing in a Box 10' below the antenna
>mast...

Why not right at the antenna? Incidentally, have a wonderful time
trying to get it waterproof. That's not a tivial exercise. I like to
use pressurized enclosures, but that's messy and expensive.

>May as well. I really am never going to need to fuss with it.

Yeah, sure. That's true until water gets into the antenna, coax, or
radio. Or until a neighbor adds an access point and trashes your
channel. Or until the tin foil hat crowd arrives to declare your
transmitter to be a danger to wildlife, health, and the environment.

>;-) I have some RG8 with N connectors (I will install one in the AP340,
>although I wish I didn't have to hack up the little wire connector /
>antenna in there now.)

Don't do that. RG-8/u is VERY lossy at 2.4GHz. What you want is
LMR-400. See:
http://www.ocarc.ca/coax.htm
RG-8/u eats 13dB/100ft
LMR-400 eats 6.7dB/100ft
For a 10ft run, that's only 0.5dB difference, so you can possibly get
away with it. As for butchering the access point, permit me to
suggest using a pigtail or adapter from R-TNC to N.
http://www.fab-corp.com/K1.htm
You can get one that's 10ft long if you wanna make it one piece and
avoid the LMR-400. However, your loss will be radically higher.

Argh. Visitors, gotta run.


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
September 20, 2004 2:30:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Jeff Liebermann wrote:
> On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 17:31:15 -0700, Andrew <award@cisco.com> wrote:
>
>
>>Actually I AM going to house the thing in a Box 10' below the antenna
>>mast...
>
>
> Why not right at the antenna? Incidentally, have a wonderful time
> trying to get it waterproof. That's not a tivial exercise. I like to
> use pressurized enclosures, but that's messy and expensive.
>
>
>>May as well. I really am never going to need to fuss with it.
>
>
> Yeah, sure. That's true until water gets into the antenna, coax, or
> radio. Or until a neighbor adds an access point and trashes your
> channel. Or until the tin foil hat crowd arrives to declare your
> transmitter to be a danger to wildlife, health, and the environment.
>
>
>>;-) I have some RG8 with N connectors (I will install one in the AP340,
>>although I wish I didn't have to hack up the little wire connector /
>>antenna in there now.)
>
>
> Don't do that. RG-8/u is VERY lossy at 2.4GHz. What you want is
> LMR-400. See:

OK... Sorry.. My bad. It IS LMR-400 ... I just assumed it was RG-8,
sincs it is about the same size as I rember RG8 from my radio days.

> http://www.ocarc.ca/coax.htm
> RG-8/u eats 13dB/100ft
> LMR-400 eats 6.7dB/100ft
> For a 10ft run, that's only 0.5dB difference, so you can possibly get
> away with it. As for butchering the access point, permit me to
> suggest using a pigtail or adapter from R-TNC to N.
> http://www.fab-corp.com/K1.htm
> You can get one that's 10ft long if you wanna make it one piece and
> avoid the LMR-400. However, your loss will be radically higher.
>
> Argh. Visitors, gotta run.
>
>
Thanks

-Andrew
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 20, 2004 6:50:02 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

A lot of this sounds like a UHF&VHF TV antenna project I did 45 years ago.

I like the shortest run possible. Go right to the top by the antenna.

Is a pole stiff enough? I used a 20ft tower on top of the house. I
could climb on it easily. Of course my antenna was 4' high and 5' wide,
but you are working to a much closer aiming tolerance. I had a rotator.

I used a 10 watt light bulb in the "bird house" which housed the down
convertor to keep moisture down when it was off. This was in upstate
New York. This also drew questions from people driving by who asked
about the light (visible through a plexiglass panel) on the top of the
antenna tower.

What is your outside environment? Too cold and some solid state
equipment stops running.


Jeff Liebermann wrote:

> On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 17:31:15 -0700, Andrew <award@cisco.com> wrote:
>
>
>>Actually I AM going to house the thing in a Box 10' below the antenna
>>mast...
>
>
> Why not right at the antenna? Incidentally, have a wonderful time
> trying to get it waterproof. That's not a tivial exercise. I like to
> use pressurized enclosures, but that's messy and expensive.
>
>
>>May as well. I really am never going to need to fuss with it.
>
>
> Yeah, sure. That's true until water gets into the antenna, coax, or
> radio. Or until a neighbor adds an access point and trashes your
> channel. Or until the tin foil hat crowd arrives to declare your
> transmitter to be a danger to wildlife, health, and the environment.
>
>
>>;-) I have some RG8 with N connectors (I will install one in the AP340,
>>although I wish I didn't have to hack up the little wire connector /
>>antenna in there now.)
>
>
> Don't do that. RG-8/u is VERY lossy at 2.4GHz. What you want is
> LMR-400. See:
> http://www.ocarc.ca/coax.htm
> RG-8/u eats 13dB/100ft
> LMR-400 eats 6.7dB/100ft
> For a 10ft run, that's only 0.5dB difference, so you can possibly get
> away with it. As for butchering the access point, permit me to
> suggest using a pigtail or adapter from R-TNC to N.
> http://www.fab-corp.com/K1.htm
> You can get one that's 10ft long if you wanna make it one piece and
> avoid the LMR-400. However, your loss will be radically higher.
>
> Argh. Visitors, gotta run.
>
>
September 20, 2004 6:50:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

There *are* outdoor bridges and access points being manufactured. While
not cheap, they probably are as cheap as going through all the
contortions to make your own system work and they're pretty reliable
right out of the box. AND there's no LMR-400 to run unless you need to
make a short pigtail, which makes for very low loss.

hxbarney@cap.rr.com wrote:

> A lot of this sounds like a UHF&VHF TV antenna project I did 45 years ago.
>
> I like the shortest run possible. Go right to the top by the antenna.
>
> Is a pole stiff enough? I used a 20ft tower on top of the house. I
> could climb on it easily. Of course my antenna was 4' high and 5' wide,
> but you are working to a much closer aiming tolerance. I had a rotator.
>
> I used a 10 watt light bulb in the "bird house" which housed the down
> convertor to keep moisture down when it was off. This was in upstate
> New York. This also drew questions from people driving by who asked
> about the light (visible through a plexiglass panel) on the top of the
> antenna tower.
>
> What is your outside environment? Too cold and some solid state
> equipment stops running.
>
>
> Jeff Liebermann wrote:
>
>> On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 17:31:15 -0700, Andrew <award@cisco.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Actually I AM going to house the thing in a Box 10' below the antenna
>>> mast...
>>
>>
>>
>> Why not right at the antenna? Incidentally, have a wonderful time
>> trying to get it waterproof. That's not a tivial exercise. I like to
>> use pressurized enclosures, but that's messy and expensive.
>>
>>
>>> May as well. I really am never going to need to fuss with it.
>>
>>
>>
>> Yeah, sure. That's true until water gets into the antenna, coax, or
>> radio. Or until a neighbor adds an access point and trashes your
>> channel. Or until the tin foil hat crowd arrives to declare your
>> transmitter to be a danger to wildlife, health, and the environment.
>>
>>
>>> ;-) I have some RG8 with N connectors (I will install one in the
>>> AP340, although I wish I didn't have to hack up the little wire
>>> connector / antenna in there now.)
>>
>>
>>
>> Don't do that. RG-8/u is VERY lossy at 2.4GHz. What you want is
>> LMR-400. See:
>> http://www.ocarc.ca/coax.htm
>> RG-8/u eats 13dB/100ft
>> LMR-400 eats 6.7dB/100ft
>> For a 10ft run, that's only 0.5dB difference, so you can possibly get
>> away with it. As for butchering the access point, permit me to
>> suggest using a pigtail or adapter from R-TNC to N.
>> http://www.fab-corp.com/K1.htm
>> You can get one that's 10ft long if you wanna make it one piece and
>> avoid the LMR-400. However, your loss will be radically higher.
>>
>> Argh. Visitors, gotta run.
>>
>>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 20, 2004 6:50:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Mon, 20 Sep 2004 02:50:02 GMT, hxbarney@cap.rr.com wrote:

>A lot of this sounds like a UHF&VHF TV antenna project I did 45 years ago.
>I like the shortest run possible. Go right to the top by the antenna.

Yeah, but your probably did it with twinlead, which doesn't like to be
near anything metallic and hates sharp turns.

>Is a pole stiff enough? I used a 20ft tower on top of the house. I
>could climb on it easily. Of course my antenna was 4' high and 5' wide,
>but you are working to a much closer aiming tolerance. I had a rotator.

It depends on the pipe length and antenna type. The 14dBi yagi is
about 25 degrees. You can get fairly sloppy with the pipe and antenna
mount and still have it work. However, the -3dB vertical beamwidth of
a 24dBi dish antenna is about 8 degrees. That's going to take a
rather stiff pipe and rigid mounting.

>I used a 10 watt light bulb in the "bird house" which housed the down
>convertor to keep moisture down when it was off. This was in upstate
>New York. This also drew questions from people driving by who asked
>about the light (visible through a plexiglass panel) on the top of the
>antenna tower.

Yep, heating will prevent condensation and help evaporate moisture.
However, most access points burn as much power and do fairly well on
keeping themselves warm. That's fine for the winter, but may cause
overheating during the summer. Make sure there's some holes so
there's a place for the evaporated moisture to go.

>What is your outside environment? Too cold and some solid state
>equipment stops running.

I live in the Monterey Bay area. Temperatures are mild and do not
tend toward extremes. The dense redwood/fir forest acts as a
moderator. We have an easy environment.

Outdoor repackage with a Linksys WRT54G:
http://www.sveasoft.com/modules.php?name=SveasoftArticl...
(9 pages. Click on the tiny "next" in lower right of page).

There are also access points made for outdoor use:
http://www.dlink.com/products/?pid=36
You won't like the price.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
September 20, 2004 6:50:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Thanks for the reply, response in-line

hxbarney@cap.rr.com wrote:

> A lot of this sounds like a UHF&VHF TV antenna project I did 45 years ago.
>
> I like the shortest run possible. Go right to the top by the antenna.
>
> Is a pole stiff enough? I used a 20ft tower on top of the house. I
> could climb on it easily. Of course my antenna was 4' high and 5' wide,
> but you are working to a much closer aiming tolerance. I had a rotator.
>
> I used a 10 watt light bulb in the "bird house" which housed the down
> convertor to keep moisture down when it was off. This was in upstate
> New York. This also drew questions from people driving by who asked
> about the light (visible through a plexiglass panel) on the top of the
> antenna tower.
>
> What is your outside environment? Too cold and some solid state
> equipment stops running.

In the SF Bay area, inland. Lowest temp would be somewhere around 28
deg, once or twice a year. Avg temp probably around 60-80 deg.

-Andrew
September 20, 2004 6:50:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Thanks Rôgêr,

Trying to keep the costs as LOW as possible. Experiementer quality, not
production or sale-able quality.

-Andrew


Rôgêr wrote:

> There *are* outdoor bridges and access points being manufactured. While
> not cheap, they probably are as cheap as going through all the
> contortions to make your own system work and they're pretty reliable
> right out of the box. AND there's no LMR-400 to run unless you need to
> make a short pigtail, which makes for very low loss.
>
> hxbarney@cap.rr.com wrote:
>
>> A lot of this sounds like a UHF&VHF TV antenna project I did 45 years
>> ago.
>>
>> I like the shortest run possible. Go right to the top by the antenna.
>>
>> Is a pole stiff enough? I used a 20ft tower on top of the house. I
>> could climb on it easily. Of course my antenna was 4' high and 5'
>> wide, but you are working to a much closer aiming tolerance. I had a
>> rotator.
>>
>> I used a 10 watt light bulb in the "bird house" which housed the down
>> convertor to keep moisture down when it was off. This was in upstate
>> New York. This also drew questions from people driving by who asked
>> about the light (visible through a plexiglass panel) on the top of the
>> antenna tower.
>>
>> What is your outside environment? Too cold and some solid state
>> equipment stops running.
>>
>>
>> Jeff Liebermann wrote:
>>
>>> On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 17:31:15 -0700, Andrew <award@cisco.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>> Actually I AM going to house the thing in a Box 10' below the
>>>> antenna mast...
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Why not right at the antenna? Incidentally, have a wonderful time
>>> trying to get it waterproof. That's not a tivial exercise. I like to
>>> use pressurized enclosures, but that's messy and expensive.
>>>
>>>
>>>> May as well. I really am never going to need to fuss with it.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Yeah, sure. That's true until water gets into the antenna, coax, or
>>> radio. Or until a neighbor adds an access point and trashes your
>>> channel. Or until the tin foil hat crowd arrives to declare your
>>> transmitter to be a danger to wildlife, health, and the environment.
>>>
>>>
>>>> ;-) I have some RG8 with N connectors (I will install one in the
>>>> AP340, although I wish I didn't have to hack up the little wire
>>>> connector / antenna in there now.)
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Don't do that. RG-8/u is VERY lossy at 2.4GHz. What you want is
>>> LMR-400. See:
>>> http://www.ocarc.ca/coax.htm
>>> RG-8/u eats 13dB/100ft
>>> LMR-400 eats 6.7dB/100ft
>>> For a 10ft run, that's only 0.5dB difference, so you can possibly get
>>> away with it. As for butchering the access point, permit me to
>>> suggest using a pigtail or adapter from R-TNC to N.
>>> http://www.fab-corp.com/K1.htm
>>> You can get one that's 10ft long if you wanna make it one piece and
>>> avoid the LMR-400. However, your loss will be radically higher.
>>>
>>> Argh. Visitors, gotta run.
>>>
>>>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 20, 2004 1:26:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 17:31:15 -0700, Andrew <award@cisco.com> wrote:

>> Nope. Absolutely no tips, hints, clues, or help delivered without a
>> disclosure as to what operating system you're working with.

>XP Pro. ;-) NO SP-2 (yet, anyway)

XP SP2 seems to be about 98.5% together. It breaks some VPN's and
makes a mess if you don't clear out the spyware, worms, virii, and 3rd
party utilities first. The usual vendor driver versus Wireless Zero
Config problems are still there. Pick one. Some firewall
configuration is required after installation. Two Toshiba laptops
experienced a miraculous improvement in performance after SP2. No
clue why.

You're ahead of me on the troubleshooting. Try it with a direct wired
LAN connection to the router. If that works, then you can assume that
the Windows IP stack is intact. You cannot assume that Wireless Zero
Config or the vendors drivers are working. Concentrate on those.
Start by disarming Wireless Zero Config and rely on your unspecified
vendors drivers to do the config. Use:
ipconfig /release
ipconfig /renew
ipconfig
to kick start a DHCP request. If that fails, setup a static IP
address, DNS, gateway and see if it work. If static IP's work, then
something is preventing the broadcasts from going through the Cisco
341 access point.

>AIR-AP341S1C AIR-US

Ok. One antenna access point with only 40 bit WEP encryption. Yuck.
If the serial number is less than 1EE99001247, you may have a rate
shifting problem if set to anything other than 11mbits/sec.
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps441/p...

>There are two modes the Senao cna operate in. Which one is preferred?

Two modes of what? Hot and cold? WEP and WPA? Ad-hoc or
infrastructure?

>Pretty sure the Cisco AP is configged' properly, since I can attach with
>my laptop through it.

Sigh. I decode this to mean that you have a 2nd laptop, or that you
have another wireless card for your sole laptop. If you mean that you
can connect directly with a LAN cable to your unspecified router,
thereby bypassing the the wireless access point and Seneo card, this
proves little. Do you have another computah and wireless card that
works through the Cisco wireless access point? If so, then there's
probably something screwed up in the Seneo driver or Wireless Zero
Config.


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
September 20, 2004 3:31:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Thanks again Jeff.

Response in-line.

Jeff Liebermann wrote:
> XP SP2 seems to be about 98.5% together. It breaks some VPN's and
> makes a mess if you don't clear out the spyware, worms, virii, and 3rd

I'm not installing it until I hear more from the field, and especially
since this is a Cisco laptop with all the corporate security stuff
installed on my laptop... (Which I installed XP preemptively on while
the rest of Cisco is on earlier versions of Windows.)

> You're ahead of me on the troubleshooting. Try it with a direct wired
> LAN connection to the router. If that works, then you can assume that
> the Windows IP stack is intact. You cannot assume that Wireless Zero
> Config or the vendors drivers are working. Concentrate on those.
> Start by disarming Wireless Zero Config and rely on your unspecified
> vendors drivers to do the config. Use:
> ipconfig /release
> ipconfig /renew
> ipconfig
> to kick start a DHCP request. If that fails, setup a static IP
> address, DNS, gateway and see if it work. If static IP's work, then
> something is preventing the broadcasts from going through the Cisco
> 341 access point.

Let me clarify. here. I use the same laptop for all these experiments.
When I tested the router for connectivity I tested it with the wireless
card in my laptop turned ON.

When I tested the Senao, I turned OFF the radio in my laptop which
forces all traffic to go over the 10/100 port. I can talk to the senao &
config it over the 10/100 connection between the laptop and the Senao.
(XP used the Automatic IP Address mode since no DHCP was happening.)

>>AIR-AP341S1C AIR-US
>
>
> Ok. One antenna access point with only 40 bit WEP encryption. Yuck.
> If the serial number is less than 1EE99001247, you may have a rate
> shifting problem if set to anything other than 11mbits/sec.
> http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps441/p...

Mine must have been updated. It has WEP-128 capability (but it is OFF
until I get everything working.)

>>There are two modes the Senao cna operate in. Which one is preferred?

OK, I don't have the menu in front of me just now, but on the ethernet
config page, I think it was a Point-to-Point mode and a Bridge mode.
(vague memory). I tried both, to no avail.

> Sigh. I decode this to mean that you have a 2nd laptop, or that you
> have another wireless card for your sole laptop. If you mean that you
> can connect directly with a LAN cable to your unspecified router,
> thereby bypassing the the wireless access point and Seneo card, this
> proves little. Do you have another computah and wireless card that
> works through the Cisco wireless access point? If so, then there's
> probably something screwed up in the Seneo driver or Wireless Zero
> Config.

Clarified above, but a picture is here:

Problem Config

+------+ +---------+ +--------+ Z Z +-----+ +-------+
|Cable | | Siemens | | Cisco | | | |Senao|10/100|IBM T30|
|Modem |-----| firewall|----| AP 340 |-+ +---| |------|Laptop |
+------+ +---------+ +--------+ +-----+ +-------+
(RADIO OFF)
Working Config:
+------+ +---------+ +--------+ Z Z +-------+
|Cable | | Siemens | | Cisco | | | |IBM T30|
|Modem |-----| firewall|----| AP 340 |-+ +---|Laptop |
+------+ +---------+ +--------+ +-------+


I really wonder where i could get some perspective on the Senao? I think
the problem in IT's config.

Please advise. Many thanks.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 21, 2004 3:00:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Mon, 20 Sep 2004 11:31:25 -0700, Andrew <award@cisco.com> wrote:

>>>AIR-AP341S1C AIR-US

>OK, I don't have the menu in front of me just now, but on the ethernet
>config page, I think it was a Point-to-Point mode and a Bridge mode.
>(vague memory). I tried both, to no avail.

Are you *SURE* that you have this model box? From your firmware
description, you have a wireless bridge, which is designed
specifically to connect to another identical wireless bridge unit (or
units) and will NOT associate with a client radio. The hardware is
exactly the same as the access point version, but Cisco charges some
huge amount more for it. It is possible by nefarious means to upgrade
an access point to a bridge, which is my guess(tm) what's happening
here.

The way it should be is:
WEP
340 None
341 40bit
342 128bit

See:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk722/tk809/technologie...
Which states that an AP-341S1C should be a 40bit access point, which
does NOT have a point to point or bridge mode. The only choice for an
access point is infrastructure.

>+------+ +---------+ +--------+ Z Z +-----+ +-------+
>|Cable | | Siemens | | Cisco | | | |Senao|10/100|IBM T30|
>|Modem |-----| firewall|----| AP 340 |-+ +---| |------|Laptop |
>+------+ +---------+ +--------+ +-----+ +-------+
> (RADIO OFF)
>Working Config:
>+------+ +---------+ +--------+ Z Z +-------+
>|Cable | | Siemens | | Cisco | | | |IBM T30|
>|Modem |-----| firewall|----| AP 340 |-+ +---|Laptop |
>+------+ +---------+ +--------+ +-------+

Nice drawing. I've been assuming that you have a Senao card, not a
bridge. (That's what happens when the important info in is the
Subject line and not the body). The Cisco seems to be acting
successfully as an access point as you can connect with the T30 laptop
client radio.

However, you apparently want to build a wireless bridge with two
different manufacturers products. That never seems to work. In order
to play transparent bridge, each device on the ends of the wireless
link needs to have a complete collection of the MAC addresses and
endpoints (ports) associated with these MAC addresses. Transfering
and distributing this bridging info is not standardized and performed
differently by each manufacturer. Some clone each others protocols,
but even then, there's no guarantee of compatibility. If the "Senao"
box has a client mode configuration setting, then it might be
convinced to work. Otherwise, you have something strange going on as
wireless bridges NEVER allow random client radios to associate. That
seems to imply that the Cisco is really an access point, or that is
has some universal mode that allows both bridging and infrastructure
connections.

>I really wonder where i could get some perspective on the Senao?

Perspective is easy. Senao is a manufactory of cards. Other vendor
cram Senao PCMCIA cards into their products and call them routers,
access points, and client radios. Since you have a 10/100 connection,
I can deduce that you have some type of bridge or access point that
has a Senao card and possibly a Senao manufactured bridge or access
point. Some disclosure as to the exact make and model would be
helpful. If this is one of those OEM samples that I've seen
advertised, the FCCID number would suffice.

>I think
>the problem in IT's config.
>
>Please advise. Many thanks.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
!