Routers

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Hey all,

Have a quick question do the routers available replace the westel modem
that is provided by verizon. For example will I be pluging the phone line
that goes into the westel right into the router or do I connect the westel
to the router?

Any suggestions on decent home routers, wireless?

Thanks
Steve
3 answers Last reply
More about routers
  1. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    "ESteveP" <spetropoSPAM@NOTverizon.net> wrote in message
    news:Xns9523C9B597955ESP@130.81.64.196...
    > Hey all,
    >
    > Have a quick question do the routers available replace the westel modem
    > that is provided by verizon. For example will I be pluging the phone line
    > that goes into the westel right into the router or do I connect the westel
    > to the router?
    >
    > Any suggestions on decent home routers, wireless?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Steve

    This may be the wrong place for that q, but as it happens, I do have three
    wireless networks at home, and another at work (I'm currently on vacation in
    a hotel in Las Vegas that also has it's own hotspot). One with a dial-up,
    one with MO and a cellphone, one with a cable modem, and one with a DSL
    modem. I think the westel is a DSL modem, and we have DSL at work (a
    different type of modem tho). One of the benefits of working at a computer
    store is you get a lot of free stuff and get to try a bunch of things so we
    can sell/install/tell people how they work. We tried a whole bunch of
    WAP/Routers to find the one that worked best for us at the work/hotspot. A
    linksys (www.linksys.com) WRT54G
    (http://www.linksys.com/products/product.asp?grid=33&scid=35&prid=601).
    (from the ad copy) The Linksys Wireless-G Broadband Router is really three
    devices in one box. First, there's the Wireless Access Point, which lets you
    connect Wireless-G or Wireless-B devices to the network. There's also a
    built-in 4-port full-duplex 10/100 Switch to connect your wired-Ethernet
    devices. Connect four PCs directly, or daisy-chain out to more hubs and
    switches to create as big a network as you need. Finally, the Router
    function ties it all together and lets your whole network share a high-speed
    cable or DSL Internet connection, files, and other resources such as
    printers and hard disk storage space. (end paste)
    To answer your q, you leave the modem phone line as it is (in the dsl
    modem), and then connect a cat-5 cable from the dsl modem to the input of
    the device (see the product pictures, 1 input from the high speed dsl/cable
    modem, and 4 router outputs to wired pc's, and up to 50 (or more) wireless
    devices can be connected at the same time).

    There are a lot of devices out there, but I have found the linksys to be the
    most stable, and the fact that it works for 802.11b or 802.11g is a huge
    plus. Many of the other devices only work for their own devices (that's how
    they get higher speeds), the 54k is the standard for G. Our decision came
    down to, When you run a Hotspot, you want it to be stable and work with the
    most devices. Ergo the linksys (a subsidiary of cisco, and a very good and
    stable product... NO I don't work for cisco!)

    A minor problem, if you use any of them at home, and try ICS, rather than a
    broadband router sharing a high speed connection, chances are you will
    either have problems or it won't work. And just to make this Verizon
    oriented, the newer version of Verizon software (MO, and the newer software
    for the Airprime card that does both NA and Broadband) do **NOT** allow
    shared connection any more. IE you can share DSL/CABLE/SAT/DC etc, but
    **NOT** call phone connections on a wireless network (anymore).
  2. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Duh, sorry wrong NG

    ESteveP <spetropoSPAM@NOTverizon.net> wrote in
    news:Xns9523C9B597955ESP@130.81.64.196:

    > Hey all,
    >
    > Have a quick question do the routers available replace the westel
    > modem that is provided by verizon. For example will I be pluging the
    > phone line that goes into the westel right into the router or do I
    > connect the westel to the router?
    >
    > Any suggestions on decent home routers, wireless?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Steve
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Some time around Sun, 11 Jul 2004 23:49:41 GMT (give or take a month), someone who says they are
    named ESteveP <spetropoSPAM@NOTverizon.net> fired up the tubes on the teletype and rambled on about:


    1) Use the correct newsgroup.
    2) Linksys makes great routers that work with Westell modems (and others)
    3) Because the modem is what connects to the Internet, it goes modem -> router -> computer.
    4) If you have any further questions, see answer #1.
    (aka don't ask any more questions here.
    Find the correct newsgroup yourself, and repeat your question)


    >Hey all,
    >
    >Have a quick question do the routers available replace the westel modem
    >that is provided by verizon. For example will I be pluging the phone line
    >that goes into the westel right into the router or do I connect the westel
    >to the router?
    >
    >Any suggestions on decent home routers, wireless?
    >
    >Thanks
    >Steve


    -W
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