what is the 1394 connection ?

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

I had the machine into the shop for days. One day I stepped in, and they had
something they said was the Internet connection [not the 56k modem] plugged in.
I never saw it used, just connected.

Thinking about this since all they had was a wire was why can't I do that
instead of this 56k modem ?

They said something about I can if I use road runner.
What are they talking about ?
It shows my 1394 connection this moment as active. @ 400 bps.

Before I took it to the shop, my LAN and 1394 were both disabled.
I'm thinking this 1394 being enabled may be what's slowing my modem down now.

If that's true I'd just as soon have the 1394 disabled again.

--
more pix @ http://members.toast.net/cbminfo/index.html
23 answers Last reply
More about what 1394 connection
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Husky wrote:
    > I had the machine into the shop for days. One day I stepped in, and
    > they had something they said was the Internet connection [not the 56k
    > modem] plugged in. I never saw it used, just connected.
    >
    > Thinking about this since all they had was a wire was why can't I do
    > that instead of this 56k modem ?
    >
    > They said something about I can if I use road runner.
    > What are they talking about ?
    > It shows my 1394 connection this moment as active. @ 400 bps.
    >
    > Before I took it to the shop, my LAN and 1394 were both disabled.
    > I'm thinking this 1394 being enabled may be what's slowing my modem
    > down now.
    >
    > If that's true I'd just as soon have the 1394 disabled again.

    Firewire.
    That's 1394.

    They likely installed or used yor Network Card to connect to their Internet
    connection to make fixing your issues easier.
    Go ahead and disable Firewire if you do not use it.

    --
    Shenan Stanley
    MS-MVP
    --
    How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Hi Husky,

    The 1394 connection appears because your computer has an IEEE 1394 (FireWire) port, which
    is usually used to connect other devices (cameras, external hard disks, etc) to the
    computer.

    --
    Regards,
    Bert Kinney MS-MVP Shell/User
    http://bertk.mvps.org

    Husky wrote:
    > I had the machine into the shop for days. One day I
    > stepped in, and they had something they said was the
    > Internet connection [not the 56k modem] plugged in. I
    > never saw it used, just connected.
    >
    > Thinking about this since all they had was a wire was why
    > can't I do that instead of this 56k modem ?
    >
    > They said something about I can if I use road runner.
    > What are they talking about ?
    > It shows my 1394 connection this moment as active. @ 400
    > bps.
    >
    > Before I took it to the shop, my LAN and 1394 were both
    > disabled.
    > I'm thinking this 1394 being enabled may be what's
    > slowing my modem down now.
    >
    > If that's true I'd just as soon have the 1394 disabled
    > again.
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 12:14:28 -0400, "Bert Kinney" <bert@NSmvps.org> wrote:

    >Hi Husky,
    >
    >The 1394 connection appears because your computer has an IEEE 1394 (FireWire) port, which
    >is usually used to connect other devices (cameras, external hard disks, etc) to the
    >computer.

    And ? why is it now enabled ? Was it used for the Internet connection at the
    shop ? What ISP can I connect to for DSL with this connection ? If all it takes
    is a wire, I'd prefer that to adding a bunch of hardware.

    Should I disable it ?
    Does this 1394 have anything to with DSL or the Internet ?


    --
    more pix @ http://members.toast.net/cbminfo/index.html
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    "Husky" <cbminfo@toast.net> wrote in message
    news:o56mh1hvg3u3vf6bciumpgv78l6idasfkj@4ax.com...
    >I had the machine into the shop for days. One day I stepped in, and
    >they had
    > something they said was the Internet connection [not the 56k modem]
    > plugged in.
    > I never saw it used, just connected.
    >
    > Thinking about this since all they had was a wire was why can't I do
    > that
    > instead of this 56k modem ?
    >
    > They said something about I can if I use road runner.
    > What are they talking about ?
    > It shows my 1394 connection this moment as active. @ 400 bps.
    >
    > Before I took it to the shop, my LAN and 1394 were both disabled.
    > I'm thinking this 1394 being enabled may be what's slowing my modem
    > down now.
    >
    > If that's true I'd just as soon have the 1394 disabled again.
    >
    > --
    > more pix @ http://members.toast.net/cbminfo/index.html


    It doesn't hurt to have the other network connectoids enabled as long as
    you do not attach the devices specified within them to a networking
    device. You only need one connectoid to be enabled (unless you are
    configuring your host to act as a gateway, but which is highly unlikely
    if you are talking about analog 56K modems for dial-up access).

    What you are seeing under the Network Connections applet in Control
    Panel are the connectoids. These are network *definitions*, not the
    actual devices used by them (i.e., those aren't devices but
    definitions). They define which protocols are bound to which device:
    you get to pick the protocols and to which device they are bound. For
    example, and since I had both a NIC (network interface card) for
    Ethernet LAN access and an analog 56K modem, I had a free dial-up
    provider (under 10 hours was free) which I kept for backup to provide
    e-mail service should my broadband provider go dead (either no
    connectivity or problems with their e-mail service). Normally only the
    LAN connectoid was enabled (it bound to the NIC). If I had to switch, I
    disabled the LAN connectoid and enabled the dial-up connectoid (which
    was bound to the analog 56K modem). When my ISP was back up for
    broadband access, I'd disable the dial-up connectoid and enable the LAN
    connectoid (for the NIC specified in it that was connected to their
    cable modem).

    Normally you should only have one network connectoid enabled. I doubt
    you know what is a gateway or how to set one up, and that's about the
    only time that I can think of where you would want to have more than one
    connectoid enabled at a time. It doesn't hurt to have multiple
    connectoids enabled if, say, only one of them was actually bound to a
    networking device. Most users of the Firewire port use them for digital
    cameras. Disabling the IEEE-1394 networking connectoid won't disable
    the Firewire port. The shop used the Firewire port because they had a
    Firewire hub, switch, or broadband modem to which they could connect to
    give them vastly superior download speed to retrieve any drivers,
    patches, or utilities that they needed to install on your computer.
    They forgot to disable it but then normally leaving it enabled doesn't
    cause a problem. Mine has been disabled ever since I got the computer
    but then I never attach any network devices to a Firewire port.

    You can disable the IEEE-1394 connectoid, especially since you don't
    have anything attached to a Firewire port. However, and because you had
    nothing connected to it, enabling or disabling it won't affect your
    speed using the LAN connectoid (which normally uses a NIC for an
    Ethernet connection) or the speed of a dial-up connectoid (for your
    analog 56K modem).

    Go ahead and disable the IEEE-1394 (Firewire) network connectoid. You
    won't lose Internet connectivity (as long as your dial-up connectoid is
    enabled) but it isn't the cause of your perceived slowdown, either. Are
    you using the Firewire port at all for networking, like providing two
    network interfaces for ICS (Internet Connection Service) where the
    Firewire port is used for networking amongst your intranetwork hosts and
    the dial-up modem is used to share the Internet access (i.e., you are
    using your host as a gateway via ICS to share the Internet access
    amongst several hosts at home)?

    --
    ____________________________________________________________
    For e-mail, remove "NIX" and add "#LAH" passcode to Subject.
    ____________________________________________________________
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 18:43:40 -0500, "Vanguard" <vanguard.code@comcastNIX.net>
    wrote:

    >"Husky" <cbminfo@toast.net> wrote in message
    >news:o56mh1hvg3u3vf6bciumpgv78l6idasfkj@4ax.com...
    >>I had the machine into the shop for days. One day I stepped in, and
    >>they had
    >> something they said was the Internet connection [not the 56k modem]
    >> plugged in.
    >> I never saw it used, just connected.
    >>
    >> Thinking about this since all they had was a wire was why can't I do
    >> that
    >> instead of this 56k modem ?
    >>
    >> They said something about I can if I use road runner.
    >> What are they talking about ?
    >> It shows my 1394 connection this moment as active. @ 400 bps.
    >>
    >> Before I took it to the shop, my LAN and 1394 were both disabled.
    >> I'm thinking this 1394 being enabled may be what's slowing my modem
    >> down now.
    >>
    >> If that's true I'd just as soon have the 1394 disabled again.
    >>
    >> --
    >> more pix @ http://members.toast.net/cbminfo/index.html
    >
    >
    >It doesn't hurt to have the other network connectoids enabled as long as
    >you do not attach the devices specified within them to a networking
    >device. You only need one connectoid to be enabled (unless you are
    >configuring your host to act as a gateway, but which is highly unlikely
    >if you are talking about analog 56K modems for dial-up access).
    >
    >What you are seeing under the Network Connections applet in Control
    >Panel are the connectoids. These are network *definitions*, not the
    >actual devices used by them (i.e., those aren't devices but
    >definitions). They define which protocols are bound to which device:
    >you get to pick the protocols and to which device they are bound. For
    >example, and since I had both a NIC (network interface card) for
    >Ethernet LAN access and an analog 56K modem, I had a free dial-up
    >provider (under 10 hours was free) which I kept for backup to provide
    >e-mail service should my broadband provider go dead (either no
    >connectivity or problems with their e-mail service). Normally only the
    >LAN connectoid was enabled (it bound to the NIC). If I had to switch, I
    >disabled the LAN connectoid and enabled the dial-up connectoid (which
    >was bound to the analog 56K modem). When my ISP was back up for
    >broadband access, I'd disable the dial-up connectoid and enable the LAN
    >connectoid (for the NIC specified in it that was connected to their
    >cable modem).
    >
    >Normally you should only have one network connectoid enabled. I doubt
    >you know what is a gateway or how to set one up, and that's about the
    >only time that I can think of where you would want to have more than one
    >connectoid enabled at a time. It doesn't hurt to have multiple
    >connectoids enabled if, say, only one of them was actually bound to a
    >networking device. Most users of the Firewire port use them for digital
    >cameras. Disabling the IEEE-1394 networking connectoid won't disable
    >the Firewire port. The shop used the Firewire port because they had a
    >Firewire hub, switch, or broadband modem to which they could connect to
    >give them vastly superior download speed to retrieve any drivers,
    >patches, or utilities that they needed to install on your computer.
    >They forgot to disable it but then normally leaving it enabled doesn't
    >cause a problem. Mine has been disabled ever since I got the computer
    >but then I never attach any network devices to a Firewire port.
    >
    >You can disable the IEEE-1394 connectoid, especially since you don't
    >have anything attached to a Firewire port. However, and because you had
    >nothing connected to it, enabling or disabling it won't affect your
    >speed using the LAN connectoid (which normally uses a NIC for an
    >Ethernet connection) or the speed of a dial-up connectoid (for your
    >analog 56K modem).
    >
    >Go ahead and disable the IEEE-1394 (Firewire) network connectoid. You
    >won't lose Internet connectivity (as long as your dial-up connectoid is
    >enabled) but it isn't the cause of your perceived slowdown, either. Are
    >you using the Firewire port at all for networking, like providing two
    >network interfaces for ICS (Internet Connection Service) where the
    >Firewire port is used for networking amongst your intranetwork hosts and
    >the dial-up modem is used to share the Internet access (i.e., you are
    >using your host as a gateway via ICS to share the Internet access
    >amongst several hosts at home)?


    >You can disable the IEEE-1394 connectoid, especially since you don't
    >have anything attached to a Firewire port. However, and because you had
    >nothing connected to it, enabling or disabling it won't affect your
    >speed using the LAN connectoid (which normally uses a NIC for an
    >Ethernet connection) or the speed of a dial-up connectoid (for your
    >analog 56K modem).

    Well that was totally confusing till I got to this. Actually the connection
    says connected. Where all but my 2 modem connections were either connected or
    disconnected. Which is where the confusion is. If there's a 1394 connected @
    400 bps. I'd sure like to see some of that speed.

    I disabled it and it now shows disabled.
    something above about them having a 'The shop used the Firewire port because
    they had a Firewire hub, switch, or broadband modem'

    In the back of my machine it was just a wire. And when I asked could I get DSL
    by plugging in that wire, they said I could if I had roadrunner. Roadrunner,
    far as I know is an ISP. What would that have to do with plugging a wire into
    my machine bypassing the modem ?

    Don't get so technical if you choose to reply. I haven't even looked into
    anything but modems ever.
    I started with a 300 baud external, and now use a 56k internal.

    --
    more pix @ http://members.toast.net/cbminfo/index.html
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    On Sun, 04 Sep 2005 14:33:35 -0400, Husky <cbminfo@toast.net> wrote:

    >On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 12:14:28 -0400, "Bert Kinney" <bert@NSmvps.org> wrote:
    >
    >>Hi Husky,
    >>
    >>The 1394 connection appears because your computer has an IEEE 1394 (FireWire) port, which
    >>is usually used to connect other devices (cameras, external hard disks, etc) to the
    >>computer.
    >
    >And ? why is it now enabled ? Was it used for the Internet connection at the
    >shop ? What ISP can I connect to for DSL with this connection ? If all it takes
    >is a wire, I'd prefer that to adding a bunch of hardware.
    >
    >Should I disable it ?
    >Does this 1394 have anything to with DSL or the Internet ?

    You will also need the following for a DSL connection:
    1) A specialized modem for the DSL signal to translate the DSL signal
    from the copper wire in your house to into a signal your computer can
    understand.
    2) Either an Ethernet card or an open USB port to connect the DSL
    modem to the computer, depending on the way the DSL modem connects to
    the computer. Some DSL modems use either an Ethernet card OR a USB
    port to deliver the signal to the computer. Some use only one or the
    other.
    3) Special hardware filters to put on all your extra phones.
    4) Special hardware filters put on (or removed from) your copper from
    the house to the telephone junction box.
    5) Most of all, a DSL signal provider (almost always the local Phone
    company).
    6) In addition, a DSL account with the ISP of your choice which has a
    working arrangement with the signal provider to manage a DSL signal.

    Donald L McDaniel
    Please reply to the original thread.
    If you must reply via email, remove the obvious
    from my email address before sending.
    =======================================================
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    On Sun, 04 Sep 2005 20:26:04 -0400, Husky <cbminfo@toast.net> wrote:

    >On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 18:43:40 -0500, "Vanguard" <vanguard.code@comcastNIX.net>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>"Husky" <cbminfo@toast.net> wrote in message
    >>news:o56mh1hvg3u3vf6bciumpgv78l6idasfkj@4ax.com...
    >>>I had the machine into the shop for days. One day I stepped in, and
    >>>they had
    >>> something they said was the Internet connection [not the 56k modem]
    >>> plugged in.
    >>> I never saw it used, just connected.
    >>>
    >>> Thinking about this since all they had was a wire was why can't I do
    >>> that
    >>> instead of this 56k modem ?
    >>>
    >>> They said something about I can if I use road runner.
    >>> What are they talking about ?
    >>> It shows my 1394 connection this moment as active. @ 400 bps.
    >>>
    >>> Before I took it to the shop, my LAN and 1394 were both disabled.
    >>> I'm thinking this 1394 being enabled may be what's slowing my modem
    >>> down now.
    >>>
    >>> If that's true I'd just as soon have the 1394 disabled again.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> more pix @ http://members.toast.net/cbminfo/index.html
    >>
    >>
    >>It doesn't hurt to have the other network connectoids enabled as long as
    >>you do not attach the devices specified within them to a networking
    >>device. You only need one connectoid to be enabled (unless you are
    >>configuring your host to act as a gateway, but which is highly unlikely
    >>if you are talking about analog 56K modems for dial-up access).
    >>
    >>What you are seeing under the Network Connections applet in Control
    >>Panel are the connectoids. These are network *definitions*, not the
    >>actual devices used by them (i.e., those aren't devices but
    >>definitions). They define which protocols are bound to which device:
    >>you get to pick the protocols and to which device they are bound. For
    >>example, and since I had both a NIC (network interface card) for
    >>Ethernet LAN access and an analog 56K modem, I had a free dial-up
    >>provider (under 10 hours was free) which I kept for backup to provide
    >>e-mail service should my broadband provider go dead (either no
    >>connectivity or problems with their e-mail service). Normally only the
    >>LAN connectoid was enabled (it bound to the NIC). If I had to switch, I
    >>disabled the LAN connectoid and enabled the dial-up connectoid (which
    >>was bound to the analog 56K modem). When my ISP was back up for
    >>broadband access, I'd disable the dial-up connectoid and enable the LAN
    >>connectoid (for the NIC specified in it that was connected to their
    >>cable modem).
    >>
    >>Normally you should only have one network connectoid enabled. I doubt
    >>you know what is a gateway or how to set one up, and that's about the
    >>only time that I can think of where you would want to have more than one
    >>connectoid enabled at a time. It doesn't hurt to have multiple
    >>connectoids enabled if, say, only one of them was actually bound to a
    >>networking device. Most users of the Firewire port use them for digital
    >>cameras. Disabling the IEEE-1394 networking connectoid won't disable
    >>the Firewire port. The shop used the Firewire port because they had a
    >>Firewire hub, switch, or broadband modem to which they could connect to
    >>give them vastly superior download speed to retrieve any drivers,
    >>patches, or utilities that they needed to install on your computer.
    >>They forgot to disable it but then normally leaving it enabled doesn't
    >>cause a problem. Mine has been disabled ever since I got the computer
    >>but then I never attach any network devices to a Firewire port.
    >>
    >>You can disable the IEEE-1394 connectoid, especially since you don't
    >>have anything attached to a Firewire port. However, and because you had
    >>nothing connected to it, enabling or disabling it won't affect your
    >>speed using the LAN connectoid (which normally uses a NIC for an
    >>Ethernet connection) or the speed of a dial-up connectoid (for your
    >>analog 56K modem).
    >>
    >>Go ahead and disable the IEEE-1394 (Firewire) network connectoid. You
    >>won't lose Internet connectivity (as long as your dial-up connectoid is
    >>enabled) but it isn't the cause of your perceived slowdown, either. Are
    >>you using the Firewire port at all for networking, like providing two
    >>network interfaces for ICS (Internet Connection Service) where the
    >>Firewire port is used for networking amongst your intranetwork hosts and
    >>the dial-up modem is used to share the Internet access (i.e., you are
    >>using your host as a gateway via ICS to share the Internet access
    >>amongst several hosts at home)?
    >
    >
    >
    >>You can disable the IEEE-1394 connectoid, especially since you don't
    >>have anything attached to a Firewire port. However, and because you had
    >>nothing connected to it, enabling or disabling it won't affect your
    >>speed using the LAN connectoid (which normally uses a NIC for an
    >>Ethernet connection) or the speed of a dial-up connectoid (for your
    >>analog 56K modem).
    >
    >Well that was totally confusing till I got to this. Actually the connection
    >says connected. Where all but my 2 modem connections were either connected or
    >disconnected. Which is where the confusion is. If there's a 1394 connected @
    >400 bps. I'd sure like to see some of that speed.

    What friggin speed? Compared to even an analog modem, 400bps is
    EXTREMELY SLOW, not "fast". Consider this: an analog modem normally
    connects at between 40,000bps and 50,000bps. That is "FORTY THOUSAND
    bps" which is a factor of over a hundred times greater than the speed
    of your 1394 connection.

    >
    >I disabled it and it now shows disabled.
    >something above about them having a 'The shop used the Firewire port because
    >they had a Firewire hub, switch, or broadband modem'
    >
    >In the back of my machine it was just a wire. And when I asked could I get DSL
    >by plugging in that wire, they said I could if I had roadrunner. Roadrunner,
    >far as I know is an ISP. What would that have to do with plugging a wire into
    >my machine bypassing the modem ?

    See my other post to you about the requirements of receiving and using
    a DSL signal. Many ISPs are offering DSL very cheaply, with either
    the phone company or the ISP providing free or very cheap installation
    and DSL modem kits.

    >Don't get so technical if you choose to reply. I haven't even looked into
    >anything but modems ever.
    >I started with a 300 baud external, and now use a 56k internal.

    "300 baud" is "three hundred bits per second (bps)". "56kbps" is
    56,000 (and change) bits per second. The "k" in the "kbps" stands for
    "kilo", which is "one thousand" translated from Greek.

    Donald L McDaniel
    Please reply to the original thread.
    If you must reply via email, remove the obvious
    from my email address before sending.
    =======================================================
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    The OP most likely meant 400Mbps, as that's what most of them say if you
    right click and select "status" in the "Network Connections" window.

    To the OP - for a fact, mine shows, "Connected" and "400Mbps" as the speed,
    but I know for a fact there is nothing physically connected to either of my
    1394 (FireWire) ports on back. Also, the Windows firewall be default will
    be on the connections, as it is considered a network connection, personally
    I disable the firewall as the few times I do use the connection to connect
    to the Maxtor one touch I have on my Linux machine, it does slow down the
    xfer speeds. Although since I figured out how to setup SAMBA on my Linux
    machine, I've not even used that - so go figure, most of my 1394 capable
    peripherals are also USB 2.0 capable, and well, I have more USB ports than
    1394 ports.

    --

    Star Fleet Admiral Q @ your Service!

    http://www.google.com
    Google is your "Friend"

    "Donald L McDaniel" <invalid@invalid.com> wrote in message
    news:nc6ph1t1495iaij51bqa0uv1oiu86ma61k@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 04 Sep 2005 20:26:04 -0400, Husky <cbminfo@toast.net> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 18:43:40 -0500, "Vanguard"
    >><vanguard.code@comcastNIX.net>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>"Husky" <cbminfo@toast.net> wrote in message
    >>>news:o56mh1hvg3u3vf6bciumpgv78l6idasfkj@4ax.com...
    >>>>I had the machine into the shop for days. One day I stepped in, and
    >>>>they had
    >>>> something they said was the Internet connection [not the 56k modem]
    >>>> plugged in.
    >>>> I never saw it used, just connected.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thinking about this since all they had was a wire was why can't I do
    >>>> that
    >>>> instead of this 56k modem ?
    >>>>
    >>>> They said something about I can if I use road runner.
    >>>> What are they talking about ?
    >>>> It shows my 1394 connection this moment as active. @ 400 bps.
    >>>>
    >>>> Before I took it to the shop, my LAN and 1394 were both disabled.
    >>>> I'm thinking this 1394 being enabled may be what's slowing my modem
    >>>> down now.
    >>>>
    >>>> If that's true I'd just as soon have the 1394 disabled again.
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> more pix @ http://members.toast.net/cbminfo/index.html
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>It doesn't hurt to have the other network connectoids enabled as long as
    >>>you do not attach the devices specified within them to a networking
    >>>device. You only need one connectoid to be enabled (unless you are
    >>>configuring your host to act as a gateway, but which is highly unlikely
    >>>if you are talking about analog 56K modems for dial-up access).
    >>>
    >>>What you are seeing under the Network Connections applet in Control
    >>>Panel are the connectoids. These are network *definitions*, not the
    >>>actual devices used by them (i.e., those aren't devices but
    >>>definitions). They define which protocols are bound to which device:
    >>>you get to pick the protocols and to which device they are bound. For
    >>>example, and since I had both a NIC (network interface card) for
    >>>Ethernet LAN access and an analog 56K modem, I had a free dial-up
    >>>provider (under 10 hours was free) which I kept for backup to provide
    >>>e-mail service should my broadband provider go dead (either no
    >>>connectivity or problems with their e-mail service). Normally only the
    >>>LAN connectoid was enabled (it bound to the NIC). If I had to switch, I
    >>>disabled the LAN connectoid and enabled the dial-up connectoid (which
    >>>was bound to the analog 56K modem). When my ISP was back up for
    >>>broadband access, I'd disable the dial-up connectoid and enable the LAN
    >>>connectoid (for the NIC specified in it that was connected to their
    >>>cable modem).
    >>>
    >>>Normally you should only have one network connectoid enabled. I doubt
    >>>you know what is a gateway or how to set one up, and that's about the
    >>>only time that I can think of where you would want to have more than one
    >>>connectoid enabled at a time. It doesn't hurt to have multiple
    >>>connectoids enabled if, say, only one of them was actually bound to a
    >>>networking device. Most users of the Firewire port use them for digital
    >>>cameras. Disabling the IEEE-1394 networking connectoid won't disable
    >>>the Firewire port. The shop used the Firewire port because they had a
    >>>Firewire hub, switch, or broadband modem to which they could connect to
    >>>give them vastly superior download speed to retrieve any drivers,
    >>>patches, or utilities that they needed to install on your computer.
    >>>They forgot to disable it but then normally leaving it enabled doesn't
    >>>cause a problem. Mine has been disabled ever since I got the computer
    >>>but then I never attach any network devices to a Firewire port.
    >>>
    >>>You can disable the IEEE-1394 connectoid, especially since you don't
    >>>have anything attached to a Firewire port. However, and because you had
    >>>nothing connected to it, enabling or disabling it won't affect your
    >>>speed using the LAN connectoid (which normally uses a NIC for an
    >>>Ethernet connection) or the speed of a dial-up connectoid (for your
    >>>analog 56K modem).
    >>>
    >>>Go ahead and disable the IEEE-1394 (Firewire) network connectoid. You
    >>>won't lose Internet connectivity (as long as your dial-up connectoid is
    >>>enabled) but it isn't the cause of your perceived slowdown, either. Are
    >>>you using the Firewire port at all for networking, like providing two
    >>>network interfaces for ICS (Internet Connection Service) where the
    >>>Firewire port is used for networking amongst your intranetwork hosts and
    >>>the dial-up modem is used to share the Internet access (i.e., you are
    >>>using your host as a gateway via ICS to share the Internet access
    >>>amongst several hosts at home)?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>You can disable the IEEE-1394 connectoid, especially since you don't
    >>>have anything attached to a Firewire port. However, and because you had
    >>>nothing connected to it, enabling or disabling it won't affect your
    >>>speed using the LAN connectoid (which normally uses a NIC for an
    >>>Ethernet connection) or the speed of a dial-up connectoid (for your
    >>>analog 56K modem).
    >>
    >>Well that was totally confusing till I got to this. Actually the
    >>connection
    >>says connected. Where all but my 2 modem connections were either connected
    >>or
    >>disconnected. Which is where the confusion is. If there's a 1394 connected
    >>@
    >>400 bps. I'd sure like to see some of that speed.
    >
    > What friggin speed? Compared to even an analog modem, 400bps is
    > EXTREMELY SLOW, not "fast". Consider this: an analog modem normally
    > connects at between 40,000bps and 50,000bps. That is "FORTY THOUSAND
    > bps" which is a factor of over a hundred times greater than the speed
    > of your 1394 connection.
    >
    >>
    >>I disabled it and it now shows disabled.
    >>something above about them having a 'The shop used the Firewire port
    >>because
    >>they had a Firewire hub, switch, or broadband modem'
    >>
    >>In the back of my machine it was just a wire. And when I asked could I get
    >>DSL
    >>by plugging in that wire, they said I could if I had roadrunner.
    >>Roadrunner,
    >>far as I know is an ISP. What would that have to do with plugging a wire
    >>into
    >>my machine bypassing the modem ?
    >
    > See my other post to you about the requirements of receiving and using
    > a DSL signal. Many ISPs are offering DSL very cheaply, with either
    > the phone company or the ISP providing free or very cheap installation
    > and DSL modem kits.
    >
    >>Don't get so technical if you choose to reply. I haven't even looked into
    >>anything but modems ever.
    >>I started with a 300 baud external, and now use a 56k internal.
    >
    > "300 baud" is "three hundred bits per second (bps)". "56kbps" is
    > 56,000 (and change) bits per second. The "k" in the "kbps" stands for
    > "kilo", which is "one thousand" translated from Greek.
    >
    > Donald L McDaniel
    > Please reply to the original thread.
    > If you must reply via email, remove the obvious
    > from my email address before sending.
    > =======================================================
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    On Mon, 05 Sep 2005 12:13:29 -0700, Donald L McDaniel <invalid@invalid.com>
    wrote:

    >On Sun, 04 Sep 2005 14:33:35 -0400, Husky <cbminfo@toast.net> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 12:14:28 -0400, "Bert Kinney" <bert@NSmvps.org> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Hi Husky,
    >>>
    >>>The 1394 connection appears because your computer has an IEEE 1394 (FireWire) port, which
    >>>is usually used to connect other devices (cameras, external hard disks, etc) to the
    >>>computer.
    >>
    >>And ? why is it now enabled ? Was it used for the Internet connection at the
    >>shop ? What ISP can I connect to for DSL with this connection ? If all it takes
    >>is a wire, I'd prefer that to adding a bunch of hardware.
    >>
    >>Should I disable it ?
    >>Does this 1394 have anything to with DSL or the Internet ?
    >
    >You will also need the following for a DSL connection:
    >1) A specialized modem for the DSL signal to translate the DSL signal
    >from the copper wire in your house to into a signal your computer can
    >understand.
    >2) Either an Ethernet card or an open USB port to connect the DSL
    >modem to the computer, depending on the way the DSL modem connects to
    >the computer. Some DSL modems use either an Ethernet card OR a USB
    >port to deliver the signal to the computer. Some use only one or the
    >other.
    >3) Special hardware filters to put on all your extra phones.
    >4) Special hardware filters put on (or removed from) your copper from
    >the house to the telephone junction box.
    >5) Most of all, a DSL signal provider (almost always the local Phone
    >company).
    >6) In addition, a DSL account with the ISP of your choice which has a
    >working arrangement with the signal provider to manage a DSL signal.
    >

    All the above was attached to the other end of the wire they had plugged into
    my machine?

    Only thing they had was a plain old wire similar to the modem plug wire plugged
    in the back of my machine. No other hardware visible.

    That's what I'm saying. They said all I need is roadrunner. the ISP ? or is
    that some sort of hardware you plug that wire into, then into my machine ?

    --
    more pix @ http://members.toast.net/cbminfo/index.html
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Husky wrote:
    > All the above was attached to the other end of the wire they had
    > plugged into my machine?
    >
    > Only thing they had was a plain old wire similar to the modem plug
    > wire plugged in the back of my machine. No other hardware visible.
    >
    > That's what I'm saying. They said all I need is roadrunner. the ISP ?
    > or is that some sort of hardware you plug that wire into, then into
    > my machine ?

    Yes. You need the hardware which comes with the service most of the time.
    If DSL, you get a MODEM (external box, plugs into your phone line and then
    that box connects to your computer with a choice of cables.)
    If Cable Modem, you get a MODEM (external box, plugs into your phone line
    and then that box connects to your computer with a choice of cables.)

    They have likely setup a network in-house. They have this MODEM connected
    to their CABLE/PHONE LINE and to that - instead of hooking you lonely
    computer to it - they have a ROUTER connected to it (a BOX that allows you
    to connect MANY machines to that original MODEM and they all can use the
    service it provides.)

    So - all you would end up seeing when looking at your computer is a single
    cable (likely the network cable) plugged into your hardware and *boom*
    Internet.

    --
    Shenan Stanley
    MS-MVP
    --
    How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Shenan Stanley wrote:
    > Yes. You need the hardware which comes with the service most of the
    > time. If DSL, you get a MODEM (external box, plugs into your phone
    > line and then that box connects to your computer with a choice of
    > cables.) If Cable Modem, you get a MODEM (external box, plugs into your
    > phone
    > line and then that box connects to your computer with a choice of
    > cables.)
    > They have likely setup a network in-house. They have this MODEM
    > connected to their CABLE/PHONE LINE and to that - instead of hooking
    > you lonely computer to it - they have a ROUTER connected to it (a BOX
    > that allows you to connect MANY machines to that original MODEM and
    > they all can use the service it provides.)
    >
    > So - all you would end up seeing when looking at your computer is a
    > single cable (likely the network cable) plugged into your hardware
    > and *boom* Internet.

    Brain hiccup..

    Cable Modem plugs into your Cable Television Coax.. Not phone line. *grin*

    --
    Shenan Stanley
    MS-MVP
    --
    How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    On Mon, 05 Sep 2005 12:29:53 -0700, Donald L McDaniel <invalid@invalid.com>
    wrote:

    >On Sun, 04 Sep 2005 20:26:04 -0400, Husky <cbminfo@toast.net> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 18:43:40 -0500, "Vanguard" <vanguard.code@comcastNIX.net>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>"Husky" <cbminfo@toast.net> wrote in message
    >>>news:o56mh1hvg3u3vf6bciumpgv78l6idasfkj@4ax.com...
    >>>>I had the machine into the shop for days. One day I stepped in, and
    >>>>they had
    >>>> something they said was the Internet connection [not the 56k modem]
    >>>> plugged in.
    >>>> I never saw it used, just connected.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thinking about this since all they had was a wire was why can't I do
    >>>> that
    >>>> instead of this 56k modem ?
    >>>>
    >>>> They said something about I can if I use road runner.
    >>>> What are they talking about ?
    >>>> It shows my 1394 connection this moment as active. @ 400 bps.
    >>>>
    >>>> Before I took it to the shop, my LAN and 1394 were both disabled.
    >>>> I'm thinking this 1394 being enabled may be what's slowing my modem
    >>>> down now.
    >>>>
    >>>> If that's true I'd just as soon have the 1394 disabled again.
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> more pix @ http://members.toast.net/cbminfo/index.html
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>It doesn't hurt to have the other network connectoids enabled as long as
    >>>you do not attach the devices specified within them to a networking
    >>>device. You only need one connectoid to be enabled (unless you are
    >>>configuring your host to act as a gateway, but which is highly unlikely
    >>>if you are talking about analog 56K modems for dial-up access).
    >>>
    >>>What you are seeing under the Network Connections applet in Control
    >>>Panel are the connectoids. These are network *definitions*, not the
    >>>actual devices used by them (i.e., those aren't devices but
    >>>definitions). They define which protocols are bound to which device:
    >>>you get to pick the protocols and to which device they are bound. For
    >>>example, and since I had both a NIC (network interface card) for
    >>>Ethernet LAN access and an analog 56K modem, I had a free dial-up
    >>>provider (under 10 hours was free) which I kept for backup to provide
    >>>e-mail service should my broadband provider go dead (either no
    >>>connectivity or problems with their e-mail service). Normally only the
    >>>LAN connectoid was enabled (it bound to the NIC). If I had to switch, I
    >>>disabled the LAN connectoid and enabled the dial-up connectoid (which
    >>>was bound to the analog 56K modem). When my ISP was back up for
    >>>broadband access, I'd disable the dial-up connectoid and enable the LAN
    >>>connectoid (for the NIC specified in it that was connected to their
    >>>cable modem).
    >>>
    >>>Normally you should only have one network connectoid enabled. I doubt
    >>>you know what is a gateway or how to set one up, and that's about the
    >>>only time that I can think of where you would want to have more than one
    >>>connectoid enabled at a time. It doesn't hurt to have multiple
    >>>connectoids enabled if, say, only one of them was actually bound to a
    >>>networking device. Most users of the Firewire port use them for digital
    >>>cameras. Disabling the IEEE-1394 networking connectoid won't disable
    >>>the Firewire port. The shop used the Firewire port because they had a
    >>>Firewire hub, switch, or broadband modem to which they could connect to
    >>>give them vastly superior download speed to retrieve any drivers,
    >>>patches, or utilities that they needed to install on your computer.
    >>>They forgot to disable it but then normally leaving it enabled doesn't
    >>>cause a problem. Mine has been disabled ever since I got the computer
    >>>but then I never attach any network devices to a Firewire port.
    >>>
    >>>You can disable the IEEE-1394 connectoid, especially since you don't
    >>>have anything attached to a Firewire port. However, and because you had
    >>>nothing connected to it, enabling or disabling it won't affect your
    >>>speed using the LAN connectoid (which normally uses a NIC for an
    >>>Ethernet connection) or the speed of a dial-up connectoid (for your
    >>>analog 56K modem).
    >>>
    >>>Go ahead and disable the IEEE-1394 (Firewire) network connectoid. You
    >>>won't lose Internet connectivity (as long as your dial-up connectoid is
    >>>enabled) but it isn't the cause of your perceived slowdown, either. Are
    >>>you using the Firewire port at all for networking, like providing two
    >>>network interfaces for ICS (Internet Connection Service) where the
    >>>Firewire port is used for networking amongst your intranetwork hosts and
    >>>the dial-up modem is used to share the Internet access (i.e., you are
    >>>using your host as a gateway via ICS to share the Internet access
    >>>amongst several hosts at home)?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>You can disable the IEEE-1394 connectoid, especially since you don't
    >>>have anything attached to a Firewire port. However, and because you had
    >>>nothing connected to it, enabling or disabling it won't affect your
    >>>speed using the LAN connectoid (which normally uses a NIC for an
    >>>Ethernet connection) or the speed of a dial-up connectoid (for your
    >>>analog 56K modem).
    >>
    >>Well that was totally confusing till I got to this. Actually the connection
    >>says connected. Where all but my 2 modem connections were either connected or
    >>disconnected. Which is where the confusion is. If there's a 1394 connected @
    >>400 bps. I'd sure like to see some of that speed.
    >
    >What friggin speed? Compared to even an analog modem, 400bps is
    >EXTREMELY SLOW, not "fast". Consider this: an analog modem normally
    >connects at between 40,000bps and 50,000bps. That is "FORTY THOUSAND
    >bps" which is a factor of over a hundred times greater than the speed
    >of your 1394 connection.

    Didn't catch that till now. But that makes no sense..
    The 400bps was when it also showed connected. I would figure on faster activity
    if it were just handling stuff on the machine. or 0 altogether if it weren't
    connected to anything. So maybe that 400bps connected was slowing me down. I
    haven't been bogging since turning it off.

    >
    >>
    >>I disabled it and it now shows disabled.
    >>something above about them having a 'The shop used the Firewire port because
    >>they had a Firewire hub, switch, or broadband modem'
    >>
    >>In the back of my machine it was just a wire. And when I asked could I get DSL
    >>by plugging in that wire, they said I could if I had roadrunner. Roadrunner,
    >>far as I know is an ISP. What would that have to do with plugging a wire into
    >>my machine bypassing the modem ?
    >
    >See my other post to you about the requirements of receiving and using
    >a DSL signal. Many ISPs are offering DSL very cheaply, with either
    >the phone company or the ISP providing free or very cheap installation
    >and DSL modem kits.
    >
    >>Don't get so technical if you choose to reply. I haven't even looked into
    >>anything but modems ever.
    >>I started with a 300 baud external, and now use a 56k internal.
    >
    >"300 baud" is "three hundred bits per second (bps)". "56kbps" is
    >56,000 (and change) bits per second. The "k" in the "kbps" stands for
    >"kilo", which is "one thousand" translated from Greek.
    >
    >Donald L McDaniel
    >Please reply to the original thread.
    >If you must reply via email, remove the obvious
    >from my email address before sending.
    >=======================================================

    --
    more pix @ http://members.toast.net/cbminfo/index.html
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    "Husky" <cbminfo@toast.net> wrote in message
    news:aj3nh1dji68fhiudtlb7kou7a0mpdiagef@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 18:43:40 -0500, "Vanguard"
    > <vanguard.code@comcastNIX.net>
    > wrote:
    >
    > Well that was totally confusing till I got to this. Actually the
    > connection
    > says connected. Where all but my 2 modem connections were either
    > connected or
    > disconnected. Which is where the confusion is. If there's a 1394
    > connected @
    > 400 bps. I'd sure like to see some of that speed.
    >
    > I disabled it and it now shows disabled.
    > something above about them having a 'The shop used the Firewire port
    > because
    > they had a Firewire hub, switch, or broadband modem'
    >
    > In the back of my machine it was just a wire. And when I asked could I
    > get DSL
    > by plugging in that wire, they said I could if I had roadrunner.
    > Roadrunner,
    > far as I know is an ISP. What would that have to do with plugging a
    > wire into
    > my machine bypassing the modem ?


    You won't get any of that 400Mbps bandwidth for anything unless you
    actually have a broadband device (cable or DSL modem) that also has a
    Firewire port so you can connect it to your Firewire port. Just having
    port gives you nothing unless you attach a device to it.

    The shop meant that they thought RoadRunner provided cable or DSL modems
    that had Firewire ports. Okay, but the only way you will get that
    bandwidth is for your other local hosts on your own intranetwork
    (internal network) that are also connected using: (1) Firewire; or, (2)
    gigabit NICs (network interface cards).

    Most computers have NICs. These are network interface cards, usually
    supporting Ethernet for a LAN connection to an intranetwork. It might
    not be a card but instead a controller chip on your motherboard. You
    have an RJ-45 port on the back of your computer for the NIC that
    connects it to your internal network (and everything on the LAN-side of
    your cable/DSL modem is your intranetwork). Most computers only come
    with 10/100Mb NICs; that is, they can support 10Mbps or 100Mbps and will
    negotiate to the higher speed if whatever they are connected to will
    permit that higher speed. So you probably will only get 100Mbps
    bandwidth between the hosts in your own intranetwork. There are
    1000Mbps (gigabit) NICs but they aren't common yet.

    Okay, so maybe you get to communicate at 100Mbps between your local
    hosts. Actually you won't get 100Mbps but why is too technical for you
    and you don't really care. You will NOT get that speed for your
    Internet connection. The cable or DSL provider might give you 1Mbps,
    3Mbps, 4Mbps, or even 6Mbps bandwidth which is less than a tenth of your
    internal bandwidth with that 100Mbps NIC. USB 1.0 only gave you 11Mpbs
    and even that is faster than what your broadband ISP gives you for
    Internet bandwidth.

    Your Internet bandwidth = 1 to 6 Mbps
    USB 1.0 = 11 Mbps
    USB 2.0 = 480 Mbps
    Firewire = 400Mbps

    You are still restricted by your ISP and they bandwidth they give you.
    However, 1Mbps is still far faster than for downloads than 56Kbps (which
    is actually regulated in the USA down to 53Kbps maximum by the FCC);
    uploads are much less at 384Kbps for broadband (but that is still faster
    than 56Kbps). So whether you use a 10/100/1000Mbps NIC, a USB 1.0/2.0
    port, or Firewire, you will never realize anywhere near its intrinsic
    bandwidth for your Internet connection.

    Just having a port that says it is enabled and will give you some
    bandwidth level (but which you won't actually achieve at its maximum)
    means nothing unless you actually have a network device attached to that
    port. That might help with providing high bandwidth between your own
    local hosts on your intranetwork but you are still throttled to
    somewhere under 10Mbps for the Internet connection through the cable/DSL
    modem. So it doesn't matter if you use a NIC, USB, or Firewire because
    you still only get the much lower bandwidth that your ISP gives you.

    *IF* you go to broadband, you then get a choice of what interface to use
    to connect your computer to the cable/DSL modem: Ethernet NIC, USB,
    Firewire, or wireless. They are all far beyond what your ISP will
    permit for bandwidth to the Internet so it really doesn't matter which
    interface you use. However, since it is possible that you will use a
    USB keyboard, USB mouse, USB printer, USB scanner, and other USB devices
    then flooding the USB channel with all that traffic along with network
    traffic results in more collisions and reduced effective transfer rate.
    Use something other than USB, if possible, like a NIC. Firewire is
    okay, too, but only if the cable/DSL modem you get also has a Firewire
    port. However, if you install a NAT router between your computer(s) and
    the cable/DSL modem, I haven't seen any (doesn't mean there aren't any)
    that have a Firewire port, so plan on using an Ethernet NIC interface.

    How you connect depends on what interfaces are provided on the hardware
    you get. There's nothing special about using Firewire to the cable/DSL
    modem than USB or a NIC since the bandwidth you'll get to the Internet
    is smaller than any of those interfaces.

    The shop had a broadband connection through a device that had a Firewire
    port, so that's what they used rather than your slow 56K analog modem,
    especially since they probably didn't have any dial-up accounts to use
    and already had their broadband connection. They might've used USB if
    that's what their cable/DSL, hub, switch, or other network device had in
    it. They might've used RJ-45 CAT5 cable to use a NIC (but then you
    probably didn't have one and is why they had to resort to using USB or
    Firewire).

    If RoadRunner provides service in your area, you could call their sales
    folks to ask which type of broadband Internet connectivity they provide
    (DSL or cable), what download and upload speeds they claim to provide
    (which are usually asynchronous so upload speed is much smaller), and
    what brand and model of DSL or cable modem they provide or suggest that
    you buy so you would know what interface it used (RJ-45 for Ethernet
    NIC, USB, Firewire, or a combination of them).

    --
    ____________________________________________________________
    For e-mail, remove "NIX" and add "#LAH" passcode to Subject.
    ____________________________________________________________
  14. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    On Mon, 5 Sep 2005 22:40:24 -0500, "Vanguard" <vanguard.code@comcastNIX.net>
    wrote:

    >"Husky" <cbminfo@toast.net> wrote in message
    >news:aj3nh1dji68fhiudtlb7kou7a0mpdiagef@4ax.com...
    >> On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 18:43:40 -0500, "Vanguard"
    >> <vanguard.code@comcastNIX.net>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> Well that was totally confusing till I got to this. Actually the
    >> connection
    >> says connected. Where all but my 2 modem connections were either
    >> connected or
    >> disconnected. Which is where the confusion is. If there's a 1394
    >> connected @
    >> 400 bps. I'd sure like to see some of that speed.
    >>
    >> I disabled it and it now shows disabled.
    >> something above about them having a 'The shop used the Firewire port
    >> because
    >> they had a Firewire hub, switch, or broadband modem'
    >>
    >> In the back of my machine it was just a wire. And when I asked could I
    >> get DSL
    >> by plugging in that wire, they said I could if I had roadrunner.
    >> Roadrunner,
    >> far as I know is an ISP. What would that have to do with plugging a
    >> wire into
    >> my machine bypassing the modem ?
    >
    >
    >You won't get any of that 400Mbps bandwidth for anything unless you
    >actually have a broadband device (cable or DSL modem) that also has a
    >Firewire port so you can connect it to your Firewire port. Just having
    >port gives you nothing unless you attach a device to it.
    >
    >The shop meant that they thought RoadRunner provided cable or DSL modems
    >that had Firewire ports. Okay, but the only way you will get that
    >bandwidth is for your other local hosts on your own intranetwork
    >(internal network) that are also connected using: (1) Firewire; or, (2)
    >gigabit NICs (network interface cards).
    >
    >Most computers have NICs. These are network interface cards, usually
    >supporting Ethernet for a LAN connection to an intranetwork. It might
    >not be a card but instead a controller chip on your motherboard. You
    >have an RJ-45 port on the back of your computer for the NIC that
    >connects it to your internal network (and everything on the LAN-side of
    >your cable/DSL modem is your intranetwork). Most computers only come
    >with 10/100Mb NICs; that is, they can support 10Mbps or 100Mbps and will
    >negotiate to the higher speed if whatever they are connected to will
    >permit that higher speed. So you probably will only get 100Mbps
    >bandwidth between the hosts in your own intranetwork. There are
    >1000Mbps (gigabit) NICs but they aren't common yet.
    >
    >Okay, so maybe you get to communicate at 100Mbps between your local
    >hosts. Actually you won't get 100Mbps but why is too technical for you
    >and you don't really care. You will NOT get that speed for your
    >Internet connection. The cable or DSL provider might give you 1Mbps,
    >3Mbps, 4Mbps, or even 6Mbps bandwidth which is less than a tenth of your
    >internal bandwidth with that 100Mbps NIC. USB 1.0 only gave you 11Mpbs
    >and even that is faster than what your broadband ISP gives you for
    >Internet bandwidth.
    >
    > Your Internet bandwidth = 1 to 6 Mbps
    > USB 1.0 = 11 Mbps
    > USB 2.0 = 480 Mbps
    I have a P4 3.2ghz w/1 gig ram. It has USB 2. and XP pro
    So the wire they had plugged in the back of my machine was running from the
    output of a DSL modem somewhere in the shop ?

    > Firewire = 400Mbps
    >
    >You are still restricted by your ISP and they bandwidth they give you.
    Well I'd have to change ISP's anyway for above 56k, cause toast.net isn't
    local. And they don't have a local DSL dial up yet.
    I think AT&T is the only DSL here. But It's still way too expensive for me.
    I read mail, and grab a few attachments from NG's.. Not a $100.00 a month habit
    yet.

    >However, 1Mbps is still far faster than for downloads than 56Kbps (which
    >is actually regulated in the USA down to 53Kbps maximum by the FCC);
    >uploads are much less at 384Kbps for broadband (but that is still faster
    >than 56Kbps). So whether you use a 10/100/1000Mbps NIC, a USB 1.0/2.0
    >port, or Firewire, you will never realize anywhere near its intrinsic
    >bandwidth for your Internet connection.
    >
    >Just having a port that says it is enabled and will give you some
    >bandwidth level (but which you won't actually achieve at its maximum)
    >means nothing unless you actually have a network device attached to that
    >port. That might help with providing high bandwidth between your own
    >local hosts on your intranetwork but you are still throttled to
    >somewhere under 10Mbps for the Internet connection through the cable/DSL
    >modem. So it doesn't matter if you use a NIC, USB, or Firewire because
    >you still only get the much lower bandwidth that your ISP gives you.
    >
    Well I have to assume the hardware to make the connection is in my machine
    since they had just the wire and DSL speed.

    >*IF* you go to broadband, you then get a choice of what interface to use
    >to connect your computer to the cable/DSL modem: Ethernet NIC, USB,
    >Firewire, or wireless. They are all far beyond what your ISP will
    >permit for bandwidth to the Internet so it really doesn't matter which
    >interface you use. However, since it is possible that you will use a
    >USB keyboard, USB mouse, USB printer, USB scanner, and other USB devices
    >then flooding the USB channel with all that traffic along with network
    >traffic results in more collisions and reduced effective transfer rate.
    >Use something other than USB, if possible, like a NIC. Firewire is
    >okay, too, but only if the cable/DSL modem you get also has a Firewire
    I have both NIC and 1394. I assume that's firewire.

    >port. However, if you install a NAT router between your computer(s) and
    >the cable/DSL modem, I haven't seen any (doesn't mean there aren't any)
    >that have a Firewire port, so plan on using an Ethernet NIC interface.
    >
    >How you connect depends on what interfaces are provided on the hardware
    >you get. There's nothing special about using Firewire to the cable/DSL
    >modem than USB or a NIC since the bandwidth you'll get to the Internet
    >is smaller than any of those interfaces.
    >
    >The shop had a broadband connection through a device that had a Firewire
    >port, so that's what they used rather than your slow 56K analog modem,
    >especially since they probably didn't have any dial-up accounts to use
    >and already had their broadband connection. They might've used USB if
    >that's what their cable/DSL, hub, switch, or other network device had in
    >it. They might've used RJ-45 CAT5 cable to use a NIC (but then you
    >probably didn't have one and is why they had to resort to using USB or
    >Firewire).
    >
    >If RoadRunner provides service in your area, you could call their sales
    >folks to ask which type of broadband Internet connectivity they provide
    >(DSL or cable), what download and upload speeds they claim to provide
    >(which are usually asynchronous so upload speed is much smaller), and
    >what brand and model of DSL or cable modem they provide or suggest that
    >you buy so you would know what interface it used (RJ-45 for Ethernet
    >NIC, USB, Firewire, or a combination of them).

    thanks..

    --
    more pix @ http://members.toast.net/cbminfo/index.html
  15. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    On Mon, 5 Sep 2005 16:58:42 -0500, "Shenan Stanley"
    <newshelper@gmail.com> wrote:

    >Husky wrote:
    >> All the above was attached to the other end of the wire they had
    >> plugged into my machine?
    >>
    >> Only thing they had was a plain old wire similar to the modem plug
    >> wire plugged in the back of my machine. No other hardware visible.
    >>
    >> That's what I'm saying. They said all I need is roadrunner. the ISP ?
    >> or is that some sort of hardware you plug that wire into, then into
    >> my machine ?
    >
    >Yes. You need the hardware which comes with the service most of the time.
    >If DSL, you get a MODEM (external box, plugs into your phone line and then
    >that box connects to your computer with a choice of cables.)
    >If Cable Modem, you get a MODEM (external box, plugs into your phone line
    >and then that box connects to your computer with a choice of cables.)

    NOTE that MANY cable providers do NOT use a telephone for uploads. All
    data comes in and goes out via the Cable connection on the wall.
    Most modern ISPs do not use a telephone line for uploads.

    This was the case the last time I had an ISP which provided cable.
    I was not even provided a phone cable in the installation kit. Just
    the modem and an Ethernet cable. All I had to do was hook up my CATV
    cable to the Cable Modem, and a normal Ethernet cable from the modem
    to my Network card. I had a choice of the method for connecting from
    the Cable Modem to my network card (either Ethernet or USB).


    >They have likely setup a network in-house. They have this MODEM connected
    >to their CABLE/PHONE LINE and to that - instead of hooking you lonely
    >computer to it - they have a ROUTER connected to it (a BOX that allows you
    >to connect MANY machines to that original MODEM and they all can use the
    >service it provides.)
    >
    >So - all you would end up seeing when looking at your computer is a single
    >cable (likely the network cable) plugged into your hardware and *boom*
    >Internet.
    >
    >--
    >Shenan Stanley
    > MS-MVP
    Donald L McDaniel
    Please reply to the original thread.
    If you must reply via email, remove the obvious
    from my email address before sending.
    =======================================================
  16. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    On Mon, 5 Sep 2005 17:08:19 -0500, "Shenan Stanley"
    <newshelper@gmail.com> wrote:

    >Shenan Stanley wrote:
    >> Yes. You need the hardware which comes with the service most of the
    >> time. If DSL, you get a MODEM (external box, plugs into your phone
    >> line and then that box connects to your computer with a choice of
    >> cables.) If Cable Modem, you get a MODEM (external box, plugs into your
    >> phone
    >> line and then that box connects to your computer with a choice of
    >> cables.)
    >> They have likely setup a network in-house. They have this MODEM
    >> connected to their CABLE/PHONE LINE and to that - instead of hooking
    >> you lonely computer to it - they have a ROUTER connected to it (a BOX
    >> that allows you to connect MANY machines to that original MODEM and
    >> they all can use the service it provides.)
    >>
    >> So - all you would end up seeing when looking at your computer is a
    >> single cable (likely the network cable) plugged into your hardware
    >> and *boom* Internet.
    >
    >Brain hiccup..
    >
    >Cable Modem plugs into your Cable Television Coax.. Not phone line. *grin*
    >
    >--
    >Shenan Stanley
    > MS-MVP

    SOME cable providers use a telephone line for uploads, and the CATV
    cable for downloads, so you WERE partially correct.

    Donald L McDaniel
    Please reply to the original thread.
    If you must reply via email, remove the obvious
    from my email address before sending.
    =======================================================
  17. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    On Mon, 05 Sep 2005 17:47:32 -0400, Husky <cbminfo@toast.net> wrote:

    >On Mon, 05 Sep 2005 12:29:53 -0700, Donald L McDaniel <invalid@invalid.com>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 04 Sep 2005 20:26:04 -0400, Husky <cbminfo@toast.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 18:43:40 -0500, "Vanguard" <vanguard.code@comcastNIX.net>
    >>>wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>"Husky" <cbminfo@toast.net> wrote in message
    >>>>news:o56mh1hvg3u3vf6bciumpgv78l6idasfkj@4ax.com...
    >>>>>I had the machine into the shop for days. One day I stepped in, and
    >>>>>they had
    >>>>> something they said was the Internet connection [not the 56k modem]
    >>>>> plugged in.
    >>>>> I never saw it used, just connected.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Thinking about this since all they had was a wire was why can't I do
    >>>>> that
    >>>>> instead of this 56k modem ?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> They said something about I can if I use road runner.
    >>>>> What are they talking about ?
    >>>>> It shows my 1394 connection this moment as active. @ 400 bps.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Before I took it to the shop, my LAN and 1394 were both disabled.
    >>>>> I'm thinking this 1394 being enabled may be what's slowing my modem
    >>>>> down now.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> If that's true I'd just as soon have the 1394 disabled again.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> --
    >>>>> more pix @ http://members.toast.net/cbminfo/index.html
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>It doesn't hurt to have the other network connectoids enabled as long as
    >>>>you do not attach the devices specified within them to a networking
    >>>>device. You only need one connectoid to be enabled (unless you are
    >>>>configuring your host to act as a gateway, but which is highly unlikely
    >>>>if you are talking about analog 56K modems for dial-up access).
    >>>>
    >>>>What you are seeing under the Network Connections applet in Control
    >>>>Panel are the connectoids. These are network *definitions*, not the
    >>>>actual devices used by them (i.e., those aren't devices but
    >>>>definitions). They define which protocols are bound to which device:
    >>>>you get to pick the protocols and to which device they are bound. For
    >>>>example, and since I had both a NIC (network interface card) for
    >>>>Ethernet LAN access and an analog 56K modem, I had a free dial-up
    >>>>provider (under 10 hours was free) which I kept for backup to provide
    >>>>e-mail service should my broadband provider go dead (either no
    >>>>connectivity or problems with their e-mail service). Normally only the
    >>>>LAN connectoid was enabled (it bound to the NIC). If I had to switch, I
    >>>>disabled the LAN connectoid and enabled the dial-up connectoid (which
    >>>>was bound to the analog 56K modem). When my ISP was back up for
    >>>>broadband access, I'd disable the dial-up connectoid and enable the LAN
    >>>>connectoid (for the NIC specified in it that was connected to their
    >>>>cable modem).
    >>>>
    >>>>Normally you should only have one network connectoid enabled. I doubt
    >>>>you know what is a gateway or how to set one up, and that's about the
    >>>>only time that I can think of where you would want to have more than one
    >>>>connectoid enabled at a time. It doesn't hurt to have multiple
    >>>>connectoids enabled if, say, only one of them was actually bound to a
    >>>>networking device. Most users of the Firewire port use them for digital
    >>>>cameras. Disabling the IEEE-1394 networking connectoid won't disable
    >>>>the Firewire port. The shop used the Firewire port because they had a
    >>>>Firewire hub, switch, or broadband modem to which they could connect to
    >>>>give them vastly superior download speed to retrieve any drivers,
    >>>>patches, or utilities that they needed to install on your computer.
    >>>>They forgot to disable it but then normally leaving it enabled doesn't
    >>>>cause a problem. Mine has been disabled ever since I got the computer
    >>>>but then I never attach any network devices to a Firewire port.
    >>>>
    >>>>You can disable the IEEE-1394 connectoid, especially since you don't
    >>>>have anything attached to a Firewire port. However, and because you had
    >>>>nothing connected to it, enabling or disabling it won't affect your
    >>>>speed using the LAN connectoid (which normally uses a NIC for an
    >>>>Ethernet connection) or the speed of a dial-up connectoid (for your
    >>>>analog 56K modem).
    >>>>
    >>>>Go ahead and disable the IEEE-1394 (Firewire) network connectoid. You
    >>>>won't lose Internet connectivity (as long as your dial-up connectoid is
    >>>>enabled) but it isn't the cause of your perceived slowdown, either. Are
    >>>>you using the Firewire port at all for networking, like providing two
    >>>>network interfaces for ICS (Internet Connection Service) where the
    >>>>Firewire port is used for networking amongst your intranetwork hosts and
    >>>>the dial-up modem is used to share the Internet access (i.e., you are
    >>>>using your host as a gateway via ICS to share the Internet access
    >>>>amongst several hosts at home)?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>You can disable the IEEE-1394 connectoid, especially since you don't
    >>>>have anything attached to a Firewire port. However, and because you had
    >>>>nothing connected to it, enabling or disabling it won't affect your
    >>>>speed using the LAN connectoid (which normally uses a NIC for an
    >>>>Ethernet connection) or the speed of a dial-up connectoid (for your
    >>>>analog 56K modem).
    >>>
    >>>Well that was totally confusing till I got to this. Actually the connection
    >>>says connected. Where all but my 2 modem connections were either connected or
    >>>disconnected. Which is where the confusion is. If there's a 1394 connected @
    >>>400 bps. I'd sure like to see some of that speed.
    >>
    >>What friggin speed? Compared to even an analog modem, 400bps is
    >>EXTREMELY SLOW, not "fast". Consider this: an analog modem normally
    >>connects at between 40,000bps and 50,000bps. That is "FORTY THOUSAND
    >>bps" which is a factor of over a hundred times greater than the speed
    >>of your 1394 connection.
    >
    >Didn't catch that till now. But that makes no sense..
    >The 400bps was when it also showed connected. I would figure on faster activity
    >if it were just handling stuff on the machine. or 0 altogether if it weren't
    >connected to anything. So maybe that 400bps connected was slowing me down. I
    >haven't been bogging since turning it off.

    WHY does it make no sense? You apparently don't understand the
    technical expressions involved.

    But I assure you, "400bps" is MUCH slower than "40,000bps". Anyone
    knowledgeable about the matter will agree with me, I'm sure.

    Either you mis-read and mis-typed the actual number you saw displayed
    (I am inclined to believe that scenario) or you just don't understand
    the technical expressions.

    Donald L McDaniel
    Please reply to the original thread.
    If you must reply via email, remove the obvious
    from my email address before sending.
    =======================================================
  18. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    On Tue, 06 Sep 2005 10:48:27 -0700, Donald L McDaniel <invalid@invalid.com>
    wrote:

    >>Didn't catch that till now. But that makes no sense..
    >>The 400bps was when it also showed connected. I would figure on faster activity
    >>if it were just handling stuff on the machine. or 0 altogether if it weren't
    >>connected to anything. So maybe that 400bps connected was slowing me down. I
    >>haven't been bogging since turning it off.
    >
    >WHY does it make no sense? You apparently don't understand the
    >technical expressions involved.
    >
    >But I assure you, "400bps" is MUCH slower than "40,000bps". Anyone
    >knowledgeable about the matter will agree with me, I'm sure.
    >
    >Either you mis-read and mis-typed the actual number you saw displayed
    >(I am inclined to believe that scenario) or you just don't understand
    >the technical expressions.

    I just went back and enabled, and can't see 400 anything anywhere. I can't
    recall where I saw the 400 less I did sysinfo.

    All this explanation sounds like a lot more expense than I'm willing to go
    with. Drill a hole in my wall. Switch ISP's, buy/rent some expensive DSL modem,
    monthly charges. etc..

    I just figured I had all the hardware already in the machine. Because it has an
    internal modem. And a modem plug just below where they'd plugged into. ie: Plug
    for their hardware or connection = ready to go.. And it was for their setup.

    And now my 1394 connection was enabled after the visit to the shop.

    --
    more pix @ http://members.toast.net/cbminfo/index.html
  19. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    On Tue, 06 Sep 2005 15:36:02 -0400, Husky <cbminfo@toast.net> wrote:

    >On Tue, 06 Sep 2005 10:48:27 -0700, Donald L McDaniel <invalid@invalid.com>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>>Didn't catch that till now. But that makes no sense..
    >>>The 400bps was when it also showed connected. I would figure on faster activity
    >>>if it were just handling stuff on the machine. or 0 altogether if it weren't
    >>>connected to anything. So maybe that 400bps connected was slowing me down. I
    >>>haven't been bogging since turning it off.
    >>
    >>WHY does it make no sense? You apparently don't understand the
    >>technical expressions involved.
    >>
    >>But I assure you, "400bps" is MUCH slower than "40,000bps". Anyone
    >>knowledgeable about the matter will agree with me, I'm sure.
    >>
    >>Either you mis-read and mis-typed the actual number you saw displayed
    >>(I am inclined to believe that scenario) or you just don't understand
    >>the technical expressions.
    >
    >I just went back and enabled, and can't see 400 anything anywhere. I can't
    >recall where I saw the 400 less I did sysinfo.
    >
    >All this explanation sounds like a lot more expense than I'm willing to go
    >with. Drill a hole in my wall. Switch ISP's, buy/rent some expensive DSL modem,
    >monthly charges. etc..

    It is not necessary to drill a hole in your wall if you purchase DSL
    service. The DSL signal uses the standard wall jacks and phone-lines
    already in your house or apartment. In addition, you will be able to
    surf the Internet at the same time you use the telephone.

    In addition, most DSL providers are offering free installation, free
    DSL modems, and very low monthly charges.
    Those that don't offer free DSL modems usually charge a very small
    monthy rental ($3-$5/mo). They are in a fierce competition with the
    Cable providers for customers right now.

    The advantage of paying a monthly rental is that the DSL provider
    won't charge you for servicing the DSL modem, and will replace for
    free a defective or malfunctioning DSL modem, including all shipping
    charges, both to you, and from you.

    Most telephone companies offer DSL services very reasonably priced.

    >
    >I just figured I had all the hardware already in the machine. Because it has an
    >internal modem. And a modem plug just below where they'd plugged into. ie: Plug
    >for their hardware or connection = ready to go.. And it was for their setup.

    What REALLY necessary for you to receive DSL service is to be within
    10,000-18,000 feet from the NOC (Network Operating Center) of the
    phone company.


    >And now my 1394 connection was enabled after the visit to the shop.

    Well, just go into Network Connection and disable it, since you don't
    need it (and under your circumstances, you never will need it.)

    Donald L McDaniel
    Please reply to the original thread.
    If you must reply via email, remove the obvious
    from my email address before sending.
    =======================================================
  20. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    On Wed, 07 Sep 2005 08:58:37 -0700, Donald L McDaniel
    <orthocrossNOSPAM@skycasters.net> wrote:

    >On Tue, 06 Sep 2005 15:36:02 -0400, Husky <cbminfo@toast.net> wrote:
    >
    >>On Tue, 06 Sep 2005 10:48:27 -0700, Donald L McDaniel <invalid@invalid.com>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>>Didn't catch that till now. But that makes no sense..
    >>>>The 400bps was when it also showed connected. I would figure on faster activity
    >>>>if it were just handling stuff on the machine. or 0 altogether if it weren't
    >>>>connected to anything. So maybe that 400bps connected was slowing me down. I
    >>>>haven't been bogging since turning it off.
    >>>
    >>>WHY does it make no sense? You apparently don't understand the
    >>>technical expressions involved.
    >>>
    >>>But I assure you, "400bps" is MUCH slower than "40,000bps". Anyone
    >>>knowledgeable about the matter will agree with me, I'm sure.
    >>>
    >>>Either you mis-read and mis-typed the actual number you saw displayed
    >>>(I am inclined to believe that scenario) or you just don't understand
    >>>the technical expressions.
    >>
    >>I just went back and enabled, and can't see 400 anything anywhere. I can't
    >>recall where I saw the 400 less I did sysinfo.
    >>
    >>All this explanation sounds like a lot more expense than I'm willing to go
    >>with. Drill a hole in my wall. Switch ISP's, buy/rent some expensive DSL modem,
    >>monthly charges. etc..
    >
    >It is not necessary to drill a hole in your wall if you purchase DSL
    >service. The DSL signal uses the standard wall jacks and phone-lines
    >already in your house or apartment. In addition, you will be able to
    >surf the Internet at the same time you use the telephone.
    >
    >In addition, most DSL providers are offering free installation, free
    >DSL modems, and very low monthly charges.
    >Those that don't offer free DSL modems usually charge a very small
    >monthy rental ($3-$5/mo). They are in a fierce competition with the
    >Cable providers for customers right now.
    >
    >The advantage of paying a monthly rental is that the DSL provider
    >won't charge you for servicing the DSL modem, and will replace for
    >free a defective or malfunctioning DSL modem, including all shipping
    >charges, both to you, and from you.
    >
    >Most telephone companies offer DSL services very reasonably priced.
    >
    >>
    >>I just figured I had all the hardware already in the machine. Because it has an
    >>internal modem. And a modem plug just below where they'd plugged into. ie: Plug
    >>for their hardware or connection = ready to go.. And it was for their setup.
    >
    >What REALLY necessary for you to receive DSL service is to be within
    >10,000-18,000 feet from the NOC (Network Operating Center) of the
    >phone company.
    >
    >
    >>And now my 1394 connection was enabled after the visit to the shop.
    >
    >Well, just go into Network Connection and disable it, since you don't
    >need it (and under your circumstances, you never will need it.)
    >
    Already did.
    --
    more pix @ http://members.toast.net/cbminfo/index.html
  21. Hi my names is BEN i am woundering is 1394 and internet or not
  22. UM WHAT IS 1394 THERE ANY WAY IF WE CAN NOT USE IT FOR THE PEOPLE THAT HAVE DIAL UP
  23. hi have still not got any reply back but the people are woundering if it is possiable if this 1394 can be used for wirless or adsl or dial up and can it do any damage to you computer. and if it can be used for internet reasons like dial up or adsl how do me turn it on. thanks for taking note of my answears
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