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Linksys WAP11 Rate/DHCP Problems

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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Anonymous
September 25, 2004 12:18:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I am having a few problems with a Linksys access point WAP11 v1.1. The
firmware on the device is 14.j.1. I am using a Linksys WPC11 PCMCIA card to
connect to the access point. The client laptop is running Windows XP SP1,
using the Linksys software(v2.1), rather than Windows Zero Configuration to
connect.

The first problem is that the client will not connect at any rate higher
than 1 Mbps. If I go into the configuration, and uncheck 1 Mbps under the
rate selection, the access point ceases to function. The AP stops
broadcasting it's SSID, and the client cannot connect. When I check 1 Mbps
again, and click apply, the client can connect (at 1 Mbps).

The second problem is that I cannot get the AP to pass DHCP to the client.
If I hardcode the IP on the client, it will function correctly. I cannot
find any settings in the AP config that allows it to pass DHCP to clients.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Anonymous
September 25, 2004 8:39:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"news.wpa.net" <eperson@spam.com> wrote in message
news:cj2dgi$c7es$1@news3.infoave.net...
>I am having a few problems with a Linksys access point WAP11 v1.1. The
>firmware on the device is 14.j.1. I am using a Linksys WPC11 PCMCIA card
>to connect to the access point. The client laptop is running Windows XP
>SP1, using the Linksys software(v2.1), rather than Windows Zero
>Configuration to connect.
>
> The first problem is that the client will not connect at any rate higher
> than 1 Mbps. If I go into the configuration, and uncheck 1 Mbps under the
> rate selection, the access point ceases to function. The AP stops
> broadcasting it's SSID, and the client cannot connect. When I check 1
> Mbps again, and click apply, the client can connect (at 1 Mbps).
>
> The second problem is that I cannot get the AP to pass DHCP to the client.
> If I hardcode the IP on the client, it will function correctly. I cannot
> find any settings in the AP config that allows it to pass DHCP to clients.
>
> Any help would be greatly appreciated.

A pure AP (no router) like the WAP11 knows nothing about DHCP. A DHCP
service is usually built into a router, although the function could be
provided by a server computer. The AP offers no such service. If you have
a device (router or server) providing a DHCP service, the AP will pass that
through without any configuration. The AP does distinguish between DHCP and
any other IP traffic.

Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+
Anonymous
September 25, 2004 4:25:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

The AP is plugged in to a Linksys BEFSR41 router. I know that it should
pass DHCP traffic, but I wasn't sure if there is a setting in there to
enable it on this AP.

"Ron Bandes" <RunderscoreBandes @yah00.com> wrote in message
news:MD65d.8311$6X1.11265731@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
> "news.wpa.net" <eperson@spam.com> wrote in message
> news:cj2dgi$c7es$1@news3.infoave.net...
>>I am having a few problems with a Linksys access point WAP11 v1.1. The
>>firmware on the device is 14.j.1. I am using a Linksys WPC11 PCMCIA card
>>to connect to the access point. The client laptop is running Windows XP
>>SP1, using the Linksys software(v2.1), rather than Windows Zero
>>Configuration to connect.
>>
>> The first problem is that the client will not connect at any rate higher
>> than 1 Mbps. If I go into the configuration, and uncheck 1 Mbps under
>> the rate selection, the access point ceases to function. The AP stops
>> broadcasting it's SSID, and the client cannot connect. When I check 1
>> Mbps again, and click apply, the client can connect (at 1 Mbps).
>>
>> The second problem is that I cannot get the AP to pass DHCP to the
>> client. If I hardcode the IP on the client, it will function correctly. I
>> cannot find any settings in the AP config that allows it to pass DHCP to
>> clients.
>>
>> Any help would be greatly appreciated.
>
> A pure AP (no router) like the WAP11 knows nothing about DHCP. A DHCP
> service is usually built into a router, although the function could be
> provided by a server computer. The AP offers no such service. If you
> have a device (router or server) providing a DHCP service, the AP will
> pass that through without any configuration. The AP does distinguish
> between DHCP and any other IP traffic.
>
> Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+
>
Related resources
Anonymous
September 25, 2004 10:28:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"E Person" <eperson@spam.com> wrote in message
news:cj465h$d54c$1@news3.infoave.net...
> The AP is plugged in to a Linksys BEFSR41 router. I know that it should
> pass DHCP traffic, but I wasn't sure if there is a setting in there to
> enable it on this AP.
>
> "Ron Bandes" <RunderscoreBandes @yah00.com> wrote in message
> news:MD65d.8311$6X1.11265731@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
>> "news.wpa.net" <eperson@spam.com> wrote in message
>> news:cj2dgi$c7es$1@news3.infoave.net...
>>>I am having a few problems with a Linksys access point WAP11 v1.1. The
>>>firmware on the device is 14.j.1. I am using a Linksys WPC11 PCMCIA card
>>>to connect to the access point. The client laptop is running Windows XP
>>>SP1, using the Linksys software(v2.1), rather than Windows Zero
>>>Configuration to connect.
>>>
>>> The first problem is that the client will not connect at any rate higher
>>> than 1 Mbps. If I go into the configuration, and uncheck 1 Mbps under
>>> the rate selection, the access point ceases to function. The AP stops
>>> broadcasting it's SSID, and the client cannot connect. When I check 1
>>> Mbps again, and click apply, the client can connect (at 1 Mbps).
>>>
>>> The second problem is that I cannot get the AP to pass DHCP to the
>>> client. If I hardcode the IP on the client, it will function correctly.
>>> I cannot find any settings in the AP config that allows it to pass DHCP
>>> to clients.
>>>
>>> Any help would be greatly appreciated.
>>
>> A pure AP (no router) like the WAP11 knows nothing about DHCP. A DHCP
>> service is usually built into a router, although the function could be
>> provided by a server computer. The AP offers no such service. If you
>> have a device (router or server) providing a DHCP service, the AP will
>> pass that through without any configuration. The AP does distinguish
>> between DHCP and any other IP traffic.
>>
>> Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+

That should have been "The AP does NOT distinguish between DHCP and any
other IP traffic."

Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+
Anonymous
September 25, 2004 10:28:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Sat, 25 Sep 2004 18:28:48 GMT, "Ron Bandes" <RunderscoreBandes
@yah00.com> wrote:

>That should have been "The AP does NOT distinguish between DHCP and any
>other IP traffic."
>Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+

Actually, routers can sometimes distinguish between ordinary traffic
and DHCP broadcasts.

Two possible mechanisms:

1. Broadcast pass thru. Many routers, and especially VPN routers,
have some kind of broadcast control (Sonicwall, Cisco, etc). The idea
is to eliminate wasted traffic across the wireless (or through a VPN).
Usually it's a setting like "broadcast pass thru" or something
similar. It may also be Note that this is for routers only, not
access points.

2. It's a bug. I've found that some routers used as access points
and with MAC address filtering enabled, simply do not pass broadcasts.
I'm not sure of the mechanism, but I have a wild guess(tm). Since
broadcast packets have no destination IP address or destination MAC
address, the MAC address filter assumes that these are not allowed.
It shouldn't care about the destination as filtering is by source MAC
address, not destination. However, methinks filtering limits
destinations to only those items allowed in the MAC address bridging
table. Since broadcast MAC's don't end up in the bridging table, they
don't pass.

Turn off MAC address filtering (and possibly IP address filtering) and
see if DHCP works.


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
September 25, 2004 11:55:56 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

OK, I fiddled around with the settings of the router, and I was able to find
the broadcast pass-through that enabled DHCP to work through the AP. Thanks
for the help.

Does anyone have any clue why the AP stops working when I disable 1Mbps.
The card seems to be fine, I can connect to my work network at 11Mbps.

Thanks again

"Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
news:2qkbl0tlriiohcncjlv40u5psdlfejpl8k@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 25 Sep 2004 18:28:48 GMT, "Ron Bandes" <RunderscoreBandes
> @yah00.com> wrote:
>
>>That should have been "The AP does NOT distinguish between DHCP and any
>>other IP traffic."
>>Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+
>
> Actually, routers can sometimes distinguish between ordinary traffic
> and DHCP broadcasts.
>
> Two possible mechanisms:
>
> 1. Broadcast pass thru. Many routers, and especially VPN routers,
> have some kind of broadcast control (Sonicwall, Cisco, etc). The idea
> is to eliminate wasted traffic across the wireless (or through a VPN).
> Usually it's a setting like "broadcast pass thru" or something
> similar. It may also be Note that this is for routers only, not
> access points.
>
> 2. It's a bug. I've found that some routers used as access points
> and with MAC address filtering enabled, simply do not pass broadcasts.
> I'm not sure of the mechanism, but I have a wild guess(tm). Since
> broadcast packets have no destination IP address or destination MAC
> address, the MAC address filter assumes that these are not allowed.
> It shouldn't care about the destination as filtering is by source MAC
> address, not destination. However, methinks filtering limits
> destinations to only those items allowed in the MAC address bridging
> table. Since broadcast MAC's don't end up in the bridging table, they
> don't pass.
>
> Turn off MAC address filtering (and possibly IP address filtering) and
> see if DHCP works.
>
>
> --
> Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
> 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
> Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
September 25, 2004 11:55:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Sat, 25 Sep 2004 19:55:56 -0400, "E Person" <eperson@spam.com>
wrote:

>OK, I fiddled around with the settings of the router, and I was able to find
>the broadcast pass-through that enabled DHCP to work through the AP. Thanks
>for the help.

Y'er welcome.

>Does anyone have any clue why the AP stops working when I disable 1Mbps.
>The card seems to be fine, I can connect to my work network at 11Mbps.

I didn't you know you could disable 1MBit/sec. With 802.11 and
802.11b, *ALL* management frames are sent at 1Mbit/sec. That's why
the "overhead" of 802.11b is so high. It's the only common speed
among the various modulation schemes that every box can understand.
Disable it and methinks your client radios are expecting 1MBit/sec
management frames and failing then they can't hear anything at
1Mbit/sec.

Are you sure you didn't mean disable 11Mbits/sec instead of 1Mbit/sec?


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
!