Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

'Wireless' 2Mbps Internet Using Blinking LEDs

Last response: in News comments
Share
May 20, 2010 10:16:28 AM

Great, more ammo for the paranoid... Saying they're sensitive to lights, so no net based on LED's...

Seriously..... Although it sounds cool, I think it's not so practical as LED's have generally low lifespans especially when they're almost always blinking.
Score
-29
May 20, 2010 10:28:55 AM

stridervm it's not so practical as LED's have generally low lifespans especially when they're almost always blinking.
What planet are you from?
LED's have amongst the longest lifespans of any bulb on this planet.
Score
29
Related resources
May 20, 2010 10:30:20 AM

??? LED's have generally low lifespans? I was under the impression that LED's had the highest lifespan of all lighting methods.
Score
12
May 20, 2010 10:31:24 AM

Hospitals do not allow cell phone or wireless technologies of any kind because it interferes with medical equipment that also uses wireless on same band. If this technology proves to be reliable it would be an alternative to prevent interference.
Score
5
May 20, 2010 10:33:17 AM

Quote:
But what if all those electromagnetic waves are undesirable to you? Then perhaps blinking lights are more to your liking.


Uh, aren't "blinking lights" still emitting electromagnetic waves? =p
Score
20
May 20, 2010 10:34:23 AM

stridervmGreat, more ammo for the paranoid... Saying they're sensitive to lights, so no net based on LED's...Seriously..... Although it sounds cool, I think it's not so practical as LED's have generally low lifespans especially when they're almost always blinking.


generally low life spans? are you talking about LED's that last 25,000 hours (and still shine 70% of what they were at when new after the 25,000 hours) ,or halogen and incandescent bulbs which typically burn out at 1,250 and 2,500 hours, respectively?

As far as i knew, LED's are the most efficient man-made visible light source we have.
Score
11
May 20, 2010 10:36:44 AM

VerrinUh, aren't "blinking lights" still emitting electromagnetic waves? =p


yes but at a much longer wave length, thus being a lot less "harmful" if you can call wireless harmful.
Score
-6
May 20, 2010 10:49:41 AM

This seems like a dead end technology IMO, walls are a major issue for radiowave wireless, using light for the medium would require a new wall building method, possibly using fibre optics running through them.

Dead end!
Score
-6
May 20, 2010 11:09:35 AM

infra-red died long ago.
Score
4
May 20, 2010 11:21:44 AM

Photograph shown here is of a light bulb (not LED)
Score
-12
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
May 20, 2010 11:32:36 AM

"But what if all those electromagnetic waves are undesirable to you? Then perhaps blinking lights are more to your liking."

and what exactly is light? if not an electromagnetic wave...??
Score
6
May 20, 2010 11:45:40 AM

CTPAHHIKHospitals do not allow cell phone or wireless technologies of any kind because it interferes with medical equipment that also uses wireless on same band. If this technology proves to be reliable it would be an alternative to prevent interference.

Having hospital equipment on heavily used public frequencies seems to be a problem that they should be focusing on fixing, not the consumers.

Morse code with flashlights at night not good enough for you? Why not hget a truckload of little LED's?
Score
0
May 20, 2010 11:55:26 AM

twisted politiksyes but at a much longer wave length, thus being a lot less "harmful" if you can call wireless harmful.

Shorter. It's just that we live with daily bombardment from visible and infrared light. Anything other wavelength range and people start worrying - microwaves, radio waves, ultraviolet, gamma and x-rays.

This seems like a dead end technology IMO, walls are a major issue for radiowave wireless, using light for the medium would require a new wall building method

Like glass? Technically radio waves have no trouble with walls. Cell phones and wireless routers use the microwave band, which almost everything absorbs or reflects.
Score
0
May 20, 2010 12:04:39 PM

Weren't the infrared ports that used to be on laptops a bit faster than this and basically used the same principle except the LEDs were infrared instead of visible light...?
Score
4
May 20, 2010 12:13:33 PM

They tried this before, it was called IrDA, and it never caught on. Only different was that it used infrared instead of visible light.
Score
5
May 20, 2010 12:14:07 PM

CTPAHHIK said:
Hospitals do not allow cell phone or wireless technologies of any kind because it interferes with medical equipment that also uses wireless on same band. If this technology proves to be reliable it would be an alternative to prevent interference.


Maybe you haven't been in a hospital recently. My last several trips I've asked about cell phones, and they've stated that as long as the patient isn't on a heart monitor, that cell phones and other wireless is just fine.
Score
2
May 20, 2010 12:19:31 PM

twisted politiksyes but at a much longer wave length, thus being a lot less "harmful" if you can call wireless harmful.


Visible light has a very short wavelength compared to radio frequency EMF.
Score
0
May 20, 2010 12:26:21 PM

guid_aaa000001Photograph shown here is of a light bulb (not LED)



The picture *IS* of an LED. Try again, Captain Failboat.
Score
12
May 20, 2010 12:28:01 PM

Now can they secure it?
Score
1
May 20, 2010 12:47:55 PM

blood_dewNow can they secure it?

Unless it is encrypted the same way wifi is, which also fires off an indiscriminate bubble of signal, at least a light can be directed in a fairly straight line. I suppose a laser beam would have been even better, but im sure the blue colour has some significance here.
Score
1
May 20, 2010 1:15:22 PM

Yawn.....
Score
-2
May 20, 2010 1:30:51 PM

warmon6Not every pic you see on here is going to be 100% accurect to the story, sometime there not really related at all....http://www.tomshardware.com/news/P [...] 10311.html


That may be true, but you cant tell me they dont have a picture of an led
Score
-2
May 20, 2010 1:41:44 PM

So it's like morse code for computers? Weird concept but it might be useful in environments suceptible to radio interference.
Score
0
a b F Wireless
May 20, 2010 1:47:56 PM

guid_aaa000001Photograph shown here is of a light bulb (not LED)

Look more carefully despite the flash light bulb appearance, Its defiantly an LED.

Look at the inside of the bulb. it looks just like an old fashioned LED. maybe not the surface mount units many are used to seeing.
http://produkbaru.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/clear-led...

Generally this may have some uses, but they will need to increase the bandwidth. IR is able to bounce off walls(I see no reason this may not be able to as well) and literally fill a room with signal. For a one way application this can work well. Check out Edifier's IR wireless speaker system.
http://www.edifier.ca/english/speakers/rainbow/rainbow....
Score
0
May 20, 2010 1:52:12 PM

This isn't exactly a new concept. Remote controls have been using a similar principle for decades. I have an HP-48SX scientific calculator, from back in the early 90s, that could transfer files wirelessly between other HP-48SX using an infrared LED.
Score
1
May 20, 2010 1:52:39 PM

fiber optic with out the fiber, good times
Score
2
May 20, 2010 2:00:34 PM

warmon6Not every pic you see on here is going to be 100% accurect to the story, sometime there not really related at all....http://www.tomshardware.com/news/P [...] 10311.html


Actually that example doesn't work warmon6... Linux uses a penguin as its logo...
Score
0
May 20, 2010 2:32:10 PM

guid_aaa000001Photograph shown here is of a light bulb (not LED)

Yes it is a LED, just not one with legs. Look at the 'bulb' itself, you can see the typical LED parts that create light.
Score
0
May 20, 2010 2:34:58 PM

marcdanilov"But what if all those electromagnetic waves are undesirable to you? Then perhaps blinking lights are more to your liking."and what exactly is light? if not an electromagnetic wave...??


It is something made from photons :) 
(though not unlike any other electromagnetic radiation)
Score
0
May 20, 2010 2:35:57 PM

CTPAHHIKHospitals do not allow cell phone or wireless technologies of any kind because it interferes with medical equipment that also uses wireless on same band. If this technology proves to be reliable it would be an alternative to prevent interference.


Hospitals shouldn't be using wireless for such critical devices.
The danger of interference from the machines there should be enough to see that. You will find also a lot of unprotected wireless keyboards, mouse stuff. These things aren't secured so when you're close to another computer. It'll start to do the same movements there too.

Pesky wireless.
Score
0
May 20, 2010 3:34:30 PM

I've seen this stuff before, though not at 2 mbps. Also LEDs are fine when turned on and off very quickly. Incandescents and florescent decrease in lifespan when flickered on and off. They also don't react as quickly as LEDs because they usually need time to warm up before getting to max output.

There is some benefit to using visible light. You don't need another transmitter like with WiFi, the lighting and the signal are together, hopefully saving some energy and making things simpler, but the problem is that it won't work too well under the sun (too much ambient light).
Score
0
May 20, 2010 3:55:41 PM

LED's suck. I refuse to use them. They have such a cold and harsh color. I love incandescent's with their warm and inviting glow. I'll never give them up.
Score
-2
May 20, 2010 5:20:08 PM

twisted politiksyes but at a much longer wave length, thus being a lot less "harmful" if you can call wireless harmful.

Do you just make this stuff up or are you really that ignorant??? Visible light is way WAY shorter wavelength than radio. Radio is from about 300 Hz, to about 300 Ghz. Visible light is more than 300 Thz. Yes, Terahertz.
Score
0
May 20, 2010 6:16:27 PM

As already mentioned, this guy just re-invented IrDA, which was popular in laptops and handhelds (e.g. Palm) about a decade ago. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IrDA

I hated IrDA. Imagine giving a presentation and having the distraction of your laptop constantly making the Windows "ba-bing" and "ba-bong" sounds of device add/removal. After 20 minutes of these interruptions, I realized my watch was acting as a mirror that was making and breaking an IrDA connection with my neighbor's computer. I always disabled the IrDA hardware after that.

Regarding security, an attacker can use a telescope and a laser (for Rx and Tx of data) to overcome distance. You still need encryption and authentication for security.

jellicoI have an HP-48SX scientific calculator, from back in the early 90s, that could transfer files wirelessly between other HP-48SX using an infrared LED.


We should get our HP48-SX calculators within 1 inch and exchange files. :-) I remember that there was a remote control app that could record the signals and play them back (manually or progammatically).
Score
1
May 20, 2010 6:45:20 PM

this is pretty much crappy infrared... lame
Score
1
May 20, 2010 7:04:44 PM

Timex had watches back in 1994 that used light to transmit data call Datalink.

In a nutshell, you held your watch up to your CRT monitor or to transmitter adapter to download phone numbers, appointments, mini-apps, etc. Transmission was only 1-way.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timex_Datalink
Score
2
May 20, 2010 7:56:12 PM

Doesn't the internal wireless network in the White House use a technology similar to this?
Score
0
May 20, 2010 9:46:57 PM

Neat, but it's certainly going to have to be faster.
Score
0
May 20, 2010 10:14:41 PM

will this help improve communications of deep space probes using blinking laser so as not to get the interference and static from traditional radio frequencies that occupy the vacuums of space?
Score
0
May 20, 2010 11:33:04 PM

If it blinks at 2MHz then it emits radio waves at 2MHz. If it blinks at 10MHz it emits radio waves at 10MHz. Sorry but that's physics. If you alternate current (turn LED on and off) you emit radio waves at that frequency + harmonics. And if you do it using 1W-100W it will be picked up by electronics in your hole neighborhood.
Score
0
May 21, 2010 12:22:40 AM

Ironic, right? That the Chinese have invented something related to the internet.
Score
0
May 21, 2010 12:54:55 AM

Congrats for the Chinese scientists for convincing someone to pay them for this waste of time.
Score
0
May 21, 2010 8:24:40 AM

It's an interesting idea, but it'll never become more than a bench project. Even if it were somehow 5x faster, why bother when you have gigabit IR in the pipeline?
Score
0
May 21, 2010 9:08:47 AM

now, instead of screaming "Move over, You're blocking the view!", you can do "Move over, you're blocking the Net!"
Score
0
May 22, 2010 10:13:23 PM

does not seem to be very practical.
Score
0
May 23, 2010 9:39:56 AM

wotan31LED's suck. I refuse to use them. They have such a cold and harsh color. I love incandescent's with their warm and inviting glow. I'll never give them up.

That's because you're an idiot.
LEDs have a bigger GAMUT-range than any other man-made light-source, that's why we use them is displays. So if you aren't a cheap-ass redneck without a brain, you'd just buy the LEDs that say 'natural light' or 'warm light' on the box, you moron.
Score
-1
May 26, 2010 12:32:18 PM

lukeeuIf it blinks at 2MHz then it emits radio waves at 2MHz. If it blinks at 10MHz it emits radio waves at 10MHz. Sorry but that's physics. If you alternate current (turn LED on and off) you emit radio waves at that frequency + harmonics. And if you do it using 1W-100W it will be picked up by electronics in your hole neighborhood.


Sorry, but that's NOT physics. You're confusing the frequency of the signal with the frequency of the waves carrying it. If you blink a light bulb on and off one time per second (1hz) and someone is watching and recieveing your "signal" you have not changed the frequency/wavelength of the light carrying it.
Score
0
!