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Willamette P4 and SIS655TX

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January 8, 2004 7:25:18 PM

Hello

I have a "socket 478 1800Mhz Pentium 4" with 256k of cache, and I would like to know if the motherboard ASUS P4S800D-E with SiS 655TX chipset, will support my processor.

I know it works with 1.75v of core voltage and i think that the codename is Willamette P4

Asus technical support doesn't reply to my emails, and the motherboard manual is confuse because it says the vcore voltage can go up to 1.950v, but its only for 0.13 micron processors. Mine must be a 0.18.

Does any motherboard with SIS655TX supports Willamette. I know that Gigabyte motherboard doesn't support it!

I have an Asus with Intel 850 at the moment.

best regards and thank you all

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More about : willamette sis655tx

a b V Motherboard
January 8, 2004 9:43:24 PM

Stick with the board you have, i850 is a fine chipset and PC800 dual channel works just as well as any other solution for your processor.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
January 9, 2004 1:04:06 AM

The problem is that I have only 2x128MB of memory, and I need more.

The cost of buying 2x256 RIMMs, is not much less as buying a new motherboard with 2x512MB of DDR400.

After buying a new one I can sell the RIMMs and the old motherboard, and the new board would have SATA, USB2, Gigabit LAN, AGP 8x, RAID, etc.

I just need to know if the processor will function, and I will not get less performance.

I cannot buy one board based on 875/865 because they would only work in DDR266 mode.

TomsHardware should put I850 and I850E based boards as comparison base in the 875/865/PT880 benchmarks
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a b V Motherboard
January 9, 2004 1:07:19 AM

What country are you in?


<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
January 10, 2004 5:10:46 PM

I live in Portugal (is in Europe next to Spain)

Thanks for your answer.


Althought I made some researches, and in the Anandtech review:
<A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mb/showdoc.html?i=1930&p=2" target="_new">http://www.anandtech.com/mb/showdoc.html?i=1930&p=2&lt;/A>

found this:

Full Prescott Compatibility
655TX also fully supports FMB (Flexible Motherboard) 2.0 and VRM (Voltage Regulator Module) 10.0 specifications...
Both the Asus and Gigabyte manuals list Socket 478 Prescott processors as fully supported on their 655TX motherboards.
Since there has been so much confusion and misinformation on the web about the new specifications, the FMB and VRM tables should help in better understanding what is required and the features provided in the new standards.

http://ar.home.sapo.pt/VRMSIS655TX.JPG


And according to what "pcs2000" told me on other forum:

"It is not the chipset, it is the regulator spec on the motherboard. Intels latest spec which current P4 boards use does not support Willy though it "should" work if MB has Vcore settings to support it. Otherwise CPU's are the pin compatable on 478 pin out"


That must be why the SIS655FX from Asus supports Willamette, but the 655FX from Gigabyte doesn't! Because of the Voltage Regulator Module.

But I still don't understand why Asus 655TX board is VRM 10.0, and they say it goes up to 1.950v instead of 1.600v.
And why in the board manual says:
"The motherboard comes with a 478-pin surface mounth, Zero Insertion Force (ZIF) socket for the Intel Pentium 4 processor in the 478-pin package with 512/256KB L2 cache on 0.13 micron process."


My Willamette is 0.18 micron!


There's some detail I miss!!!!

And Asus P4T-E with I850 is indeed a good motherboard. I found a tutorial to use the Nortwood's B CPU's (FSB 533) with PC1066 RDRAM. But nowadays 3.06 Ghz is the fastest that it can go.
a b V Motherboard
January 10, 2004 9:03:47 PM

I know where potugal is, it looks like a face and Spain looks like the rest of a head. You guys made several settlements in south america.

Anyway, you can add voltages to any specification and still claim compliancy with that specification, this is what Asus does. As long as they include the voltages within that specification, they are ok.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
!