Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

DRM Boycott

Last response: in Video Games
Share
February 19, 2010 7:06:02 PM

Remember when the British Boycotted sugar to end slavery?

I'm calling every freedom loving human being on planet earth to boycott DRM.
I have legally bought every copy of every game that i have ever had.
I don't need nor want a root kit installed on my machine, when i have legally bought my game from the store or downloaded it from EA's website.
Such root kits can and will damage your computer. Even as i write this I am getting an error message from spore asking me if my game is valid. I have had it for 4 months and have only installed it on one machine
There is a reason we all bought PC's, we love freedom and customization, not prison and slavery(DRM).
Americans and even British have a long history of freeodom/non-DRM, going all the way back to the Magna Carta.

This directly relates to the Magna Carta; limiting the powers of the king. With DRM, the corporations that implement it, effectively control all media output. This limits the press. It will cease to be a free press and instead become a DRM.press. One cannot even edit news program clips together in DVR.ms, there is no distinction for many companies between free speech and copyright. In the Declaration of Independence of the United States one of the articles is that people had the right not to have British troops stationed in their home. A DRM root kit installed on your computer, is no different than having a representitive of the DRM company sitting in your living room.

DRM should/must be outlawed. Contact your local senator or MP and ask them to outlaw DRM.
DRM hurts legal consumers, not pirates.

Please, if anyone knows of a game or peripherial that uses DRM post its name and company in this thread and join in the boycott.

DRM Games:
Spore
Assassins Creed 2
Civilization 4:colonization
Civilization 5

DRM companies:
EA
Sony
(Other companies)
Ubisoft
Valve
Steam

DRM Technology:
HDMI
Display port??

Possible DRM:
Digital TV??

*New info Oct 8 2010- Many months ago, after a lengthy discussion on a "Civilization" modding forum between modders, world citizens and corporate america many expressed their opposition to DRM. The topic received 900(estimated) posts before I abandoned commenting on it.

Take 2 is now marketing Civilization 4 as DRM free!(Civilization 4:Colonization has DRM)

Please everyone buy a copy. Your purchase supports freedom and choice The final patch to the beyond the sword expansion of the game, makes the game playable without the disc.

More about : drm boycott

February 24, 2010 9:34:48 AM

Ubisoft is really taking the biscuit when it comes to DRM now.

On Assassins Creed 2 the new DRM requires the user to be connected to the internet and Ubisofts servers at all times. This means if you happen to loose connection to the internet at any point, the game will quit and you will loose all unsaved data.

I know pirates are a problem, but making the honest customers suffer really isn't the best way to treat it.
Score
0
February 24, 2010 9:44:32 AM

I already do that my friend. I only buy games that feature at a maximum a CD-DVD protection. Anything more and the Internet is your friend... their loss not mine...
Instead of trying to find how to deter pirates from copying their games they should concentrate on how to make the legit buyers buy it! Find incentives.
Even if they claim they will close down and the market will suffer, i do have hundreds of older unfinished games that will last me a lifetime. So be it then, i would rather play my (awesome) older games rather than paying my sweet money to have my PC hijacked and force me to be online and other crap, while the pirate next door enjoys the game he did not pay for.
Score
0
Related resources
February 24, 2010 1:12:21 PM

What do you mean by 'even British have a long history'? :D 

Our history is somewhat longer than yours!

But I'm risking a flame war by being silly and expecting to have a humorous remark all taken out of context ;) 

Some DRM is fine by me. Steam for example has it great. For the majority of games, I log in once on the PC and then can work completely offline if I so choose. If I change my PC, I copy the Steam folder over and everything is there for me to play again. I can have the same games on my laptop and desktop and as long as I only use one machine at once, I'm laughing and I don't need to fill up my laptop bag with discs. It's DRM that actually makes the users life more convenient. So as it is I've bought dozens of games on Steam, some are second copies of games I've previously bought (like the GTA series) just so I don't need discs.



Score
0
February 24, 2010 2:24:28 PM

I don't mind a limited amount of DRM as long as it is not excessive. I tend to avoid games with too much DRM. X3: Reunion (sequel to X2: The Threat) had Starforce DRM. As much as I wanted to play it, I decided simply to not buy the game.

About 1.5 - 2 years after the release of X3, the publisher released a patch and utility that would bypass the activation of and also implement the removal of the Starforce DRM. At which point I bought the game for $20. :) 

Score
0
February 24, 2010 3:55:43 PM

The always connected and save games online from Ubisoft really irks me. Not because I have bad internet, but because I like to leave my gaming PC disconnected from the internet while playing (single player) so I can turn off my virus protection programs. So the steam offline mode works great for me. And for those poor people with upload limits? What, no gaming?
Score
0
February 24, 2010 8:47:36 PM

EXT64 said:
The always connected and save games online from Ubisoft really irks me. Not because I have bad internet, but because I like to leave my gaming PC disconnected from the internet while playing (single player) so I can turn off my virus protection programs. So the steam offline mode works great for me. And for those poor people with upload limits? What, no gaming?



I agree 100%. I like my offline single player games. No internet and no networks running in the background. I want to know that while i play a game there is no silly kid hacker in the background accessing my files.
Score
0
February 25, 2010 3:05:10 AM

I'm not sure if the OP is serious. If you are, and you actually want to make a difference, you should be more careful with your English, your arguments, and your written tone.

Go back to the drawing board, please. Make some rational arguments, your post sounds like you just got pissed because Spore has stupid, excessive DRM. You don't help the anti-DRM cause by sounding like a hormonal 14-year old.
Score
0
February 27, 2010 3:34:57 PM

My rational argument is that anyone playing their DRM game is giving up all their rights and freedom to a corporation.
Score
0
March 1, 2010 4:27:42 PM

Not *all* DRM is bad. Many DRM'd system are horrible, but companies that listen to customers are starting to offer less restrictive and more service oriented DRM.

Example:
BC2 has no LAN support. Now this is kind of irritating, but the fact stands that most people have decent Internet access and you can still bring all of your friends over and play your pseudo-LAN game over the internet.

Related to thee above example, BC2 has only rentable servers. This does limit people from hosting their own, but this doesn't happen much anyway. This means only a VERY few are affected by this and even then it's rare. This also means no pirated multiplayer. If someone pirates the game, they only get single player and we all know all the long term fun is in the MP anyway.

Compared to the other forms of DRM, this is a nice half-way-between.
Score
0
March 1, 2010 9:13:56 PM

Are you a EA representitive?
I assume that BC2 is that battlefield game that is being released March 5th in europe?

Some people believe that any form of DRM is invasive, wrong,immoral and unethical.
Most users such as myself wouldn't bother to pirate anything, much less set up our own servers though.
I'm curious; can gamers who legally purchased their games set up a server? basically when you play a LAN game with friends in a private residence that is what you are doing.
BC2 is not a MMORPG is it? It is not a subscription?

By european law DRM should be illegal.
Here is an example of a situation that would be similar to DRM:
If i was to go to a spa and upon leaving the manager sent a man to stalk me and terrorize me, if I did anything "suspicious".

I get an error message from Spore, just from switching between monitors, to check which one looks better.

That type of DRM reaction on EA's part, seems like paranoia to me.

SecuRom 7 is the most dastardly form of DRM. It embeds itself in your computer and has higher permissions than Administrator. It monitors all of your processes and shuts down what it deems some kind of "threat".

Not to mention, you can only install it a few times.
If you were sold a toaster or some other item and then told later that it would stop working after you plugged it into 3 different outlets(and it was considered a different outlet, if you had some new wiring put into it), there would be a lawsuit against the company that sold that product.
There might even be congressional hearings (case and point Toyota, Tobacco companies,ect..).

It is as if EA and the other corporations that are involved with DRM want to alienate people who actually buy their products.

More likely though, the corporations just seem paranoid and power hungry.
Score
0
March 2, 2010 4:13:29 PM

Lets burn all of our DRM games!!!!! Get it? I made a funny.
Score
0
March 6, 2010 3:22:18 AM

sounds fun, lol.
Score
0
March 7, 2010 10:26:46 PM

pleasenoname said:

Not to mention, you can only install it a few times.
If you were sold a toaster or some other item and then told later that it would stop working after you plugged it into 3 different outlets(and it was considered a different outlet, if you had some new wiring put into it), there would be a lawsuit against the company that sold that product.
There might even be congressional hearings (case and point Toyota, Tobacco companies,ect..)..




LOL :na:  that made my day. I don't plan on buying any Harsh DRM games ever again, honestly, I'm sick of it. I bought a "Game For Windows Live" (GFWL) Lost Planet: Extreme Condition, and after 3 hours of trying to get it to work on my computer, I could not get the multiplayer to work at all. GFWL kept telling me that I needed to update to play online, I tried to update, yes it updated, but then said I didn't update, and kept putting me through this retard loop-circuit track of trying to get my damn game to play online. Needless to say, I sold the game back on amazon (where I originally purchased it from since I don't support DRM companies), and got my money back for it.

I was really looking forward to playing Assassins Creed II, having played the first one and beating it all the way through I was very excited for the new game. However, knowing that it has securom 7 and requires a constant internet connection to play really just pissed me off. :fou:  I hope every honest consumer, like myself, boycotts every single DRM game that comes out this year until those bastard companies (EA, UBI, SONY, etc.) learn to take the DRM off the games. I was at bestbuy today and was going to pick up Batman: Arkham Asylum, for $35 with my $5 off coupon I had. I thought that was a good deal, only to find out it has securom 7. So I put the game back on the shelf and left. I wouldn't even pay $35 for a DRM game, hell I wouldn't even download it for free if it came with securom 7.

Yet, I do plan on getting the game eventually (off of amazon of course) when they come out with a crack to get rid of the DRM schemes that they have in Assassins Creed 2, I give it 1 or 2 weeks :) 

Long Rant, I know. Ha :na: 

But seriously, we have to get through to these companies, that us honest consumers won't take this anymore.
Score
0
March 7, 2010 10:30:35 PM

Also pissed that it's DX9 and not DX11... and that PC version is $60, when the xbox 360 and ps3 versions are only $40!!!!!!!!!!
Score
0
March 10, 2010 11:35:53 AM

kyzar said:
What do you mean by 'even British have a long history'? :D 

Our history is somewhat longer than yours!

But I'm risking a flame war by being silly and expecting to have a humorous remark all taken out of context ;) 

Some DRM is fine by me. Steam for example has it great. For the majority of games, I log in once on the PC and then can work completely offline if I so choose. If I change my PC, I copy the Steam folder over and everything is there for me to play again. I can have the same games on my laptop and desktop and as long as I only use one machine at once, I'm laughing and I don't need to fill up my laptop bag with discs. It's DRM that actually makes the users life more convenient. So as it is I've bought dozens of games on Steam, some are second copies of games I've previously bought (like the GTA series) just so I don't need discs.



exactly I buy 95 percent of my games through steam. not only is it great i dont have to fumble with discs, I dont even notice the drm.
Score
0
March 12, 2010 9:07:52 PM

Does steam require you to be in constant contact with the internet?

Some older games seem to get the DRM removed by the parent company.
Civilization 4 is DRM free and with the final patch it no longer requires a disc.
Tom Clancy's End War had the DRM removed. I was so happy when i found out, because i bought it for $5 on newegg. Remember though those older games that have the DRM removed, need to get the patch to remove the DRM. It's not DRM free untill the patch installs.
Score
0
March 13, 2010 4:12:05 AM

No, steam doesn't require constant internet connection (mostly). It lets you play offline except for multi-player Valve games (TF2).

And while some companies have removed their disc-checks/DRM, most haven't. Off the top of my head, Neverwinter Nights and X3 both had their DRMs removed, too.
Score
0
March 13, 2010 6:42:24 AM

Here is an online article, it is all about DRM:
http://videogames.yahoo.com/events/plugged-in/game-make...

The mainstream media glosses over the methods used by the companies to cripple resale value. This would be like; if you bought a car and it had a boot(mobility disabling device) on it when you bought it.

Another good example is a book: If I bought a book and read it, yet the publisher had decided that it didn't want me to re-sell it. So the publisher put disappearing ink on it, that disappeared a few months/years after i bought it.

I see video games as a kind of minor work of art, like a ming vase or antique book.
What happens in 500 years when some archaeologist digs up these DRM discs and it has already been activated 3 times, or there is no internet and the creators are long gone?

DRM seems like a move toward more of a dark ages mentality, in my opinion.
Score
0
May 1, 2010 6:30:24 PM

I checked out steam with a game disc purchased from a retail store.
You buy a disc. But your game isn't on the disc.
Bait and switch right there.

Steam does not install properly on the computer,
because the computer in use has cookies turned off.
Then to activate an account, one goes into the web browser of an alternate operating system to confirm the account's e-mail address, and register online.

Finally (after 5+ hours of hassle) steam installs, then there is waiting for steam to update itself. After that you may install your rented game.

Yes, If you read the EULA, they are licensing the software for basically a really long rental. You don't own anything, you are just paying for a license to use the game, until the parent company doesn't want you to.

When the game installs, it doesn't come from the disc, the disc merely contains a link to the steam server for download of the game from the internet. Depending on your internet connection speeds, this download can take anywhere from 30 minutes to 3+ hours.

Whenever the game is launched it must be logged into steam and use a steam-modified web browser to launch/play the game.

Upon looking in the processes, steam is running in the background, using +43,000KB of system resources, doing who knows what.

So, in conclusion; Steam is DRM. I am boycotting it.

Last but not least: when you register for steam, you are registering yourself, not really your game.
Score
0
May 4, 2010 3:51:42 PM

The AC2 game through Steam still has the constant online check and also limited installs. I guess Valve couldn't get Ubisoft to remove it for Steam. Too bad Valve didn't tell them to stick it where the sun don't shine.
Score
0
October 8, 2010 4:44:06 AM

I've Concluded that steam is the worst kind of DRM, because it monitors everything you do in game. This is similar to the plot of the book; "1984".

Steam collects stats/data on every action you take in the game.

Remember the NPC you bat attacked to death, Steam has got a stat for that(or those).


Score
0
October 8, 2010 4:59:10 AM

In more DRM news;

HDMI cables, such as the one I bought and tested, have DRM built into the cable and cause a black blinking screen.

There is another alternate HDMI DRM malware method employed, where it down grades the picture displayed to low resolution.


*New info Oct 8 2010- Many months ago, after a lengthy discussion on a "Civilization" modding forum between modders, world citizens and corporate america many expressed their opposition to DRM. The topic received 900(estimated) posts before I abandoned commenting on it.

Take 2 is now marketing Civilization 4 as DRM free!(Civilization 4:Colonization has DRM)


Please everyone buy a copy. Your purchase supports freedom and choice The final patch to the beyond the sword expansion of the game, makes the game playable without the disc.
Score
0
October 8, 2010 6:36:19 AM

pleasenoname said:

HDMI cables, such as the one I bought and tested, have DRM built into the cable and cause a black blinking screen.



The HDMI cable does not have built in DRM. It's the electronics that is used to send/receive audio/video signals which has the DRM.
Score
0
October 8, 2010 8:59:16 PM

Graphics cards and (Digital)TV's have DRM senders and recievers, now.

I read somewhere that the HDMI cable and Displayport cable has encryption built right into it.
I will read more and attempt to find out definitively.
Score
0
January 17, 2011 8:28:29 PM

I'm right there with you.
Just returned a game that required Steam and a 7 Gig download.
I want a cd. Activation via the intenet, ok. If its less that 50k back and forth. A couple of hashes and crypto calls, thats it.

As consumers we only have power if we are willing to take ourselves out of the equation.

I don't need the game. I just went on a hike all day and feel great. Let the sheep sit at the computer all day and play games.

If the industry ever gets its mind back I'll be the first in line to buy the games, as they can be great fun. But onerous DRM is not fun for anyone.
Score
0
February 17, 2011 9:11:41 AM

Why can't we just register to their site with our key and play the game with them knowing we bought it, Im so tired of ported games hell my PC is riddled with them, I bought bad company 2 and for once i was happy to play on my PC again now its gone as all i have left are these repetitive games, I mean go make some new special keys that can distinguish the fake from the genuine and come back to developing PC games
Score
0
February 17, 2011 10:46:10 AM

The only problem I faced with DRM is this:
Although DRM is there, piraters have increased greatly because it's easier to get a pirated version where the DRM is equal or nonexistent to a bought copy. Since every game, no matter what the DRM is and has been pirated, why do they keep trying to make DRM worse for those who actually pay for it?
Score
0
February 24, 2011 5:30:10 AM

Hey just saw on the news that Assassins creed brotherhood PC won't be chained down by the dreadful always on DRM, Thanks UBISOFT.

So some good news for the PC platform that was dubbed dead.
Score
0
February 28, 2011 3:35:07 AM

Jonathern said:
Hey just saw on the news that Assassins creed brotherhood PC won't be chained down by the dreadful always on DRM...


Remember, marketing avoids the whole truth. Here are some comments about that:

"<redacted A> says:

February, 2011
Of course, the question is “how often does this log-in occur”. If it’s “every time you start up the game”, then it’s no different to AssCreed 2’s DRM and thus is still unacceptable to me.

<redacted B> says:
February, 2011
every time you start the game."

It still has DRM. It still sends a message to the internet.
Score
0
February 28, 2011 8:09:05 AM

pleasenoname said:
Remember, marketing avoids the whole truth. Here are some comments about that:

"<redacted A> says:

February, 2011
Of course, the question is “how often does this log-in occur”. If it’s “every time you start up the game”, then it’s no different to AssCreed 2’s DRM and thus is still unacceptable to me.

<redacted B> says:
February, 2011
every time you start the game."

It still has DRM. It still sends a message to the internet.


Well i think the most you will have to do is just connect for those few seconds to make sure the game is legit but after that you can disconnect from the internet and start the game, Unfortunately assassins creed II won't change unless they can build a patch to remove it other than its better than nothing hey
Score
0
March 2, 2011 3:07:47 AM

Quote:
its better than nothing


No. It is nothing.

It has to connect every time you start the game. It's DRM. For those in their cabin in the woods on the weekend, how are they going to connect? What about the people who don't want to spend money for internet service? Or those that don't want a constant open connection to the internet?

They originally had a constant stream of data being exchanged for the DRM, that is why there were problems with the game crashing while people were playing it. Isn't that a little obsessive to require 24/7 monitoring of the game? Any company that even considers such action, must be boycotted. Otherwise you encourage even more egregious violation of person and property.

Do you work for Ubisoft or a related company?

Score
0
March 2, 2011 3:28:49 AM

pleasenoname said:
Quote:
its better than nothing


No. It is nothing.

It has to connect every time you start the game. It's DRM. For those in their cabin in the woods on the weekend, how are they going to connect? What about the people who don't want to spend money for internet service? Or those that don't want a constant open connection to the internet?

They originally had a constant stream of data being exchanged for the DRM, that is why there were problems with the game crashing while people were playing it. Isn't that a little obsessive to require 24/7 monitoring of the game? Any company that even considers such action, must be boycotted. Otherwise you encourage even more egregious violation of person and property.

Do you work for Ubisoft or a related company?


I wish i worked for ubisoft, you would see a turn around,lol,Well if i read correctly from the news that they will be lifting the DRM from the game, it can only mean you install the game and play.

The only other security measure they will leave in the game is securom which is common in most games but still better than previous games wouldn't you agree?

I mean our voices are not just falling of deaf ears, I believe PC games will return to their original state of "install and play".
Score
0
March 2, 2011 11:06:35 AM

pleasenoname said:
Quote:
its better than nothing


No. It is nothing.

It has to connect every time you start the game. It's DRM. For those in their cabin in the woods on the weekend, how are they going to connect? What about the people who don't want to spend money for internet service? Or those that don't want a constant open connection to the internet?

They originally had a constant stream of data being exchanged for the DRM, that is why there were problems with the game crashing while people were playing it. Isn't that a little obsessive to require 24/7 monitoring of the game? Any company that even considers such action, must be boycotted. Otherwise you encourage even more egregious violation of person and property.

Do you work for Ubisoft or a related company?

It's simple; gamers end up pirating it which allows publishers/developers the excuse to increase DRM and other restrictions. Although pirating will result in being able to play the game offline, it'll cause future restrictions for those who buy the game whether full or through a deal.

When people think boycott with games, they can't buy or pirate the game. You buy it, they keep it as is; you pirate it, they feel a need to refresh their DRM and make it stricter. Most people will come up with the idea, "*** the DRM, I'll just pirate it and buy a game when they get it right." A company like Ubisoft wouldn't listen to the user but instead the idea that the platformer is a dead market.
Score
0
February 25, 2012 11:44:06 PM

pleasenoname said:
Remember when the British Boycotted sugar to end slavery?

I'm calling every freedom loving human being on planet earth to boycott DRM.
I have legally bought every copy of every game that i have ever had.
I don't need nor want a root kit installed on my machine, when i have legally bought my game from the store or downloaded it from EA's website.
Such root kits can and will damage your computer. Even as i write this I am getting an error message from spore asking me if my game is valid. I have had it for 4 months and have only installed it on one machine
There is a reason we all bought PC's, we love freedom and customization, not prison and slavery(DRM).
Americans and even British have a long history of freeodom/non-DRM, going all the way back to the Magna Carta.

This directly relates to the Magna Carta; limiting the powers of the king. With DRM, the corporations that implement it, effectively control all media output. This limits the press. It will cease to be a free press and instead become a DRM.press. One cannot even edit news program clips together in DVR.ms, there is no distinction for many companies between free speech and copyright. In the Declaration of Independence of the United States one of the articles is that people had the right not to have British troops stationed in their home. A DRM root kit installed on your computer, is no different than having a representitive of the DRM company sitting in your living room.

DRM should/must be outlawed. Contact your local senator or MP and ask them to outlaw DRM.
DRM hurts legal consumers, not pirates.

Please, if anyone knows of a game or peripherial that uses DRM post its name and company in this thread and join in the boycott.

DRM Games:
Spore
Assassins Creed 2
Civilization 4:colonization
Civilization 5

DRM companies:
EA
Sony
(Other companies)
Ubisoft
Valve
Steam

DRM Technology:
HDMI
Display port??

Possible DRM:
Digital TV??

*New info Oct 8 2010- Many months ago, after a lengthy discussion on a "Civilization" modding forum between modders, world citizens and corporate america many expressed their opposition to DRM. The topic received 900(estimated) posts before I abandoned commenting on it.

Take 2 is now marketing Civilization 4 as DRM free!(Civilization 4:Colonization has DRM)

Please everyone buy a copy. Your purchase supports freedom and choice The final patch to the beyond the sword expansion of the game, makes the game playable without the disc.


A good start...but there's alot more to do! As for depending on politicians, that's a waste of time, as they are bought and (well) paid-for. Who do you think put through the DMCA?
Score
0
March 6, 2012 12:11:50 AM

Skygee said:
A good start...but there's alot more to do! As for depending on politicians, that's a waste of time, as they are bought and (well) paid-for. Who do you think put through the DMCA?


You are correct. People should still point out the hypocrasy of the elected officials using copyrighted works on their webpages, but then supporting things liker SOPA and DRM.
Score
0
March 6, 2012 2:08:21 AM

PC DRM is the fault of pirates. It's obnoxious and the companies employing it as a defensive strategy are clueless, but the entire reason that this arms race even exists is because of how ruthlessly every single PC release is pirated to hell and back.

Now piracy has become a reality on the internet and it isn't going anywhere, and DRM will continue to evolve and hopefully become less intrusive, but the real losers in this controversy are fighting game fans. The number one reason fighting games are for the most part not coming to PC is because of rampant piracy in the past.

As much as I hate to be siding with companies like EA that gobble up developers, DRM is just their response to people stealing from them. You can disagree all that you want, but unfortunately reality isn't entirely dictated by who spazzes the loudest on the internet.
Score
0
!