Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

32 bit vs 64 bit

Last response: in Windows 7
Share
October 4, 2009 12:06:41 AM

I have a few problems understanding the point of operating systems continuing with 32 bit versions, as every new cpu now is multicore and 64 bit Im just completely confused with the point of putting out a 32 bit version of Win 7. I like the fact that you are able to install 32 bit software on it, and am quite happy with the compatibility center to help with installing older software or games, it could be better but its definitely better than nothing. I'm just confused with the lack of support with other software venders there are very few 64 bit versions available, especially of security software. Since MS is basically leading the trasition to 64 bit, if they eliminated 32 bit win 7, it would force a lot of companies to produce 64 bit software, which is what we need! Sorry, thats just my rant.

I would love some advice on what softare to get regarding security, and various other aspects of 64 bit computing. Thanks.

More about : bit bit

a b $ Windows 7
October 4, 2009 12:31:28 AM

for everyone person that buys a 64bit cpu there are probably two or three users still happy with their 32bit cpu's - businesses even more so still using 32bit based systems.

So between Intel / AMD and Microsoft there is still a huge market for applications that run on 32bit CPU's - not a market any party can afford to turn their backs on
m
0
l
a c 209 $ Windows 7
October 4, 2009 12:55:01 AM

I agree that 64-bit is the way of the future. Microsoft has stopped offering the 32-bit flavour of their server OS, and I strongly suspect that Windows 7 will be the last desktop OS to be offered with a 32-bit variant.

But right now Microsoft still has to release a 32-bit version of Win7 because lots of legacy hardware and even some brand new hardware (I'm thinking Netbooks) doesn't need 64 bits and will run better without the extra couple 100MB of RAM required by the 64-bit version.

As for applications, 32-bit applications will still be with us for some time. People who write software want to sell to the biggest market, and right now delivering your app as a 64-bit package immediately cuts out more than half your market.

There's NOTHING WRONG with a 32-bit app in a 64-bit OS, unless the app uses a LOT of memory. We're starting to see some high-end applications such as PhotoShop come out in dual versions, but I don't think that a mass conversion of ALL apps is in the cards until the share of 32-bit systems in use have shrunk to perhaps 25% or less.
m
0
l
Related resources
October 4, 2009 1:00:01 AM

1 word: DRIVERS
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
October 4, 2009 4:31:21 AM

If I recall correctly, MS said that W7 would be the last OS that they would offer in 32-bit. So when the time comes for a new OS to hit the streets a few years down the road, I would expect it to only be available in 64-bit. My theory is that over the next 4-5 years we will start seeing more and more 64-bit applications and drivers from software companies and such.
m
0
l
October 7, 2009 3:33:48 AM

> I'm confused on the 32-bit and 64-bit. Are there two versions?

Yes, two different versions:

A zero in the 32-bit version looks like this, at the binary level:

00000000000000000000000000000000

A zero in the 64-bit version looks like this, at the binary level:

0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000


Thus, if a compiler assigns a 32-bit address to a variable such as "I",
then the calculation I = I +1 uses one type of hardware instructions.
The assembly code for that calculation might look like this:

LDA I /* load the A register with the contents of I
A1A /* add integer 1 to the A register
STA I /* store the current contents of the A register at I

If a compiler assigns a 64-bit address to that same variable "I",
then the calculation I = I + 1 uses different hardware instructions,
for example:

LDAA I /* load the 64-bit AA register with contents of I
A1AA /* add 1 to the AA register
STAA I /* store the contents of the AA register at I


And, those assembly instructions in turn activate
microcode sequences that do completely different
things with these long and short integers,
in part because they must also interpret the
sign bit (+ or -) correctly.

It gets even more interesting (and immensely more complex)
when generating microcode sequences for floating point numbers
e.g. double-precision and quad-precision -- where a mantissa and
and exponent must be computed separately.


MRFS
m
0
l
October 7, 2009 3:47:09 AM

itsanss said:
I'm confused on the 32-bit and 64-bit. Are there two versions to purchase or is there an option when installing that asks whether you want 32 or 64?

I pre-ordered Windows 7 Ultimate from NewEgg.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Thanks


Retails version have both options, Im am not sure if they got 2 different disk inside or if it will ask you. But they offer both. On the other hand, OEM versions of windows only come in one flavor. You bought a retail so don't worry.
m
0
l
a c 209 $ Windows 7
October 7, 2009 6:38:55 AM

MRFS said:
A zero in the 32-bit version looks like this, at the binary level...
Perhaps a simpler analogy would be this:

a 32-bit computer is like having a calculator with a 10-digit display - the numbers that the computer can handle will fit into 10 decimal digits.

a 64-bit computer is like having a calculator with a 20-digit display - the numbers that the computer can handle will fit into 20 decimal digits.

A computer can make perform calculations with numbers that are larger than will fit into its "display", but it needs to use extra instructions to do so.
m
0
l
October 7, 2009 12:04:34 PM

MRFS said:
> I'm confused on the 32-bit and 64-bit. Are there two versions?

Yes, two different versions:

A zero in the 32-bit version looks like this, at the binary level:

00000000000000000000000000000000

A zero in the 64-bit version looks like this, at the binary level:

0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000


Thus, if a compiler assigns a 32-bit address to a variable such as "I",
then the calculation I = I +1 uses one type of hardware instructions.
The assembly code for that calculation might look like this:

LDA I /* load the A register with the contents of I
A1A /* add integer 1 to the A register
STA I /* store the current contents of the A register at I

If a compiler assigns a 64-bit address to that same variable "I",
then the calculation I = I + 1 uses different hardware instructions,
for example:

LDAA I /* load the 64-bit AA register with contents of I
A1AA /* add 1 to the AA register
STAA I /* store the contents of the AA register at I


And, those assembly instructions in turn activate
microcode sequences that do completely different
things with these long and short integers,
in part because they must also interpret the
sign bit (+ or -) correctly.

It gets even more interesting (and immensely more complex)
when generating microcode sequences for floating point numbers
e.g. double-precision and quad-precision -- where a mantissa and
and exponent must be computed separately.


MRFS




Bill Gates, is that you?

lol

I certainly appreciate the very detailed "description" of both a 32-bit and 64-bit operating system.

Also, sminlal, I apprecaite the not-so-complex description.

However, BigBurn gave me exactly what I was lookin' for. :bounce: 

Perhaps this also answered some of NaibElSlayel's questions.

Thanks!
m
0
l
October 7, 2009 4:58:43 PM

NaibElSayel said:
I have a few problems understanding the point of operating systems continuing with 32 bit versions, as every new cpu now is multicore and 64 bit Im just completely confused with the point of putting out a 32 bit version of Win 7. I like the fact that you are able to install 32 bit software on it, and am quite happy with the compatibility center to help with installing older software or games, it could be better but its definitely better than nothing. I'm just confused with the lack of support with other software venders there are very few 64 bit versions available, especially of security software. Since MS is basically leading the trasition to 64 bit, if they eliminated 32 bit win 7, it would force a lot of companies to produce 64 bit software, which is what we need! Sorry, thats just my rant.

I would love some advice on what softare to get regarding security, and various other aspects of 64 bit computing. Thanks.


I would add : Business wise, 32 bit is great. At my work place we have some older hardware (IBMs T42, Dell 630...) and windows 7 works like a charm on them... that is the 32 bits version. There are just no point in trying to find drivers or software patches or upgrades for this legacy hardware. Thats why Windows 7 32 bits make sense :) 
m
0
l
!