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NEED INPUT: Want a Pentium M Desktop Board?

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June 13, 2004 11:08:20 PM

I've been wanting a Pentium M desktop since the Pentium M came out; If all else fails, I'll try to set up a group buy of the RadiSys LS-855 motherboard. But the RadiSys is an industrial board, and it's fairly expensive. So, I'm trying to get a major motherboard manufacturer to produce a reasonably priced (say, $50-$150- the same as what most other consumer boards go for) Pentium M (Banias & Dothan) ATX or mATX board.

According to <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mobile/showdoc.html?i=1800&p=4" target="_new">AnandTech</A>, the Pentium M is electrically compatible with the P4:

Quote:
Intel outfitted the Banias with a 64-bit 100MHz quad-pumped FSB, identical in design to the Pentium 4's FSB. The Banias' FSB is even electrically compatible to the Pentium 4's FSB, which is why any Pentium 4 chipset is able to interface with the chip as we saw at IDF with this E7501/Banias setup...

so it should run on say, the i865/875 chipsets as well.

Why would you want a Pentium M (Dothan or Banias) desktop?

Reason 1: The Pentium M is very, very fast. The June 2004 issue of laptop magazine has a few notebook reviews in it. Two of the notebooks they tested were a Dell Inspiron 9100 (3.2GHz Pentium 4, 512MB Dual Channel PC3200, 7200RPM/60GB HDD, Radeon 9700m/128mb) and an Acer Travelmate 8000 (1.8GHz Dothan Pentium M, 512MB PC3200, 7200RPM/60GB HDD, Radeon 9700m/128mb).

The Dell hit 11,951 in 3dmark2001se. The Acer hit 11,572. <b>A 1.8GHz Dothan is effectively as fast as a 3.2GHz Pentium 4.</b> It's not just 3dmark, either; the Pentium M is a folding monster, too. It really is a very fast CPU.

Reason 2: The Pentium M is perfect for Home Theater PCs, SFF boxes, and silent systems; in addition to the fact that it's very, very fast, it also runs extremely cool. The 900MHz ULV Pentium M has a thermal design power of only 7w. Even the 1.7GHz Banias, which puts out more heat than the 2.0GHz Dothan, only puts out 24.5w. Compare that to a Prescott Pentium 4 at over 100w, the Athlon 64/Athlon FX/Opteron at around 75w, and the Barton, also at around 75w.

Reason 3: It uses very little power. This also makes it ideal for silent systems, because less power means that the power supply will run cooler, and therefore can either be passively cooled, or cooled with much less noise.

So, a Pentium M desktop would be capable of keeping up with the fastest P4/Athlon systems around, while at the same time, running cooler, quieter, and using less power.

Basically, the point of this thread is to show these manufacturers that there is enough demand for a Pentium M board to justify building one. So, who wants one?
a b V Motherboard
June 14, 2004 6:42:31 AM

If you know for sure that it's compatable with P4 chipsets, you could make one yourself. Actually, you could make a P-M adapter card. You'd only need to upgrade the motherboard BIOS with the P-M codes. Imagine starting your own company selling the P-M adapter cards...you could get them mass produced for around $3 each and sell them for $20. Heck, I'd buy one, because you're right about set top boxes.

The P-M ULV 700 should have around 3x the power of a C3 1000. That means set top boxes actually powerfull enough to do something more challenging than simple video playback. Paired with a 9600 Pro video card and a quieter video cooling solution, you could have a STB that does everything a console does, plus everything an HTPC normally does.

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June 14, 2004 3:33:40 PM

That's not a bad idea, you know that? I've had other people mention adapter cards (I posted this on a number of forums to get as many peoples' input as possible- 5 or 10 people won't convince a motherboard manufacturer to build a board, but 500 might), but no one propose making one. It could be done, for sure. The only problem is how would I get the socket I'd need to do it? I suppose I could build it, but that would be a royal pain in the a**.
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a b V Motherboard
June 14, 2004 9:46:44 PM

If you had the dollars you could use standard parts. Motherboard makers, etc. have these parts on hand, so if you had a design and enough money for 1000 parts you could have them built for you and make nothing yourself.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
a b V Motherboard
June 14, 2004 9:47:49 PM

BTW, there are companies that will produce as few as 10 PCB's in the U.S. for you, but I'm not sure if they have the sockets.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
June 15, 2004 10:14:49 PM

Where do motherboard manufacturers get their sockets from?

<font color=blue>P4c 2.6@3.25
512Mb PC4000
2x120Gb 7200.7 in RAID0
Waterchill KT12-L30
Abit AI7
Radeon 9800Pro
</font color=blue>
a b V Motherboard
June 15, 2004 10:54:40 PM

Direct from socket manufacturers such as Amco, AMP, Foxconn, Teckon, etc.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
June 16, 2004 6:36:30 AM

Would you have to buy in bulk from these maufacturers? I was thinking about making myself a home theater system, and was origionally planning on using a 600Mhz VIA EDEN cpu, but I am a little worried that this wont be powerfull enough. How low do you think the pentium M would have to be clocked to be passivly cooled?

<font color=blue>P4c 2.6@3.25
512Mb PC4000
2x120Gb 7200.7 in RAID0
Waterchill KT12-L30
Abit AI7
Radeon 9800Pro
</font color=blue>
a b V Motherboard
June 16, 2004 6:49:31 AM

The ULV Pentium-M 900 should have at least 4x the performance of the 600MHz Eden and can be passively cooled!

I have an easier solution: Get a Celeron 1400 Tualatin, drop the bus speed to 66MHz and the voltage to 1.3v, and use a passive cooler. I've done enough testing to know that this works fine if you use one of those huge passive coolers as found on old IBM and Compaq Pentium 1 systems. Your "Celeron 933" should still have around 3x the performance of the 600MHz Eden.

You have to remember that the K6-III 450 is more powerfull than the Cyrix 3 1000. So really you have a lot of options. If you like, I have a PIII 1000EB here I can test at 500MHz (66MHz FSB) and 1.30v and see if it produces as little heat as I think it will!

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
!