Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

How to find lost mobile without imei number

Tags:
  • Security
  • Mobile
  • Business Computing
Last response: in Business Computing
Share
February 11, 2013 11:52:34 AM

plz help me

More about : find lost mobile imei number

a b 8 Security
February 11, 2013 12:20:41 PM

easy, you can't.
Score
0
February 12, 2013 1:42:03 AM

Even if you had the IMEI, you still wouldn't be able to locate your phone.

If you want to get your IMEI, you can just contact your carrier and they can tell you, as it's clearly listed in your account details.
Score
0
Related resources
February 12, 2013 2:06:48 AM

calmstateofmind said:
Even if you had the IMEI, you still wouldn't be able to locate your phone.

This is so wrong...
Score
0
February 12, 2013 2:21:57 AM

_kaos_ said:
This is so wrong...


Would you care to elaborate then? I worked for Verizon for over a year, as well as T-Mobile for over a year, so if you know something that I don't please tell me.

Pretty much the only thing that can be done with an IMEI is to restrict it from being used once the associated device is reported lost/stolen, the account goes delinquent, or the line in which the device resides on is suspended (of which the line can be unsuspended by simply changing the active device, and activating it).

The only way (that I know of) that you can recover your phone after it's lost is by having already enrolled in a service that tracks your phone, or by contacting the police, them contacting your carrier, the carrier looking to see the last towers you were active on, and then the cops pursuing that lead (which isn't much of a lead since it's a mobile device).

99% of the time you aren't going to recover your lost/stolen phone. It's unfortunate, but very true. I can't even begin to tell you how many people I've had come into the store because they're phone was lost/stolen and nothing is able to be done about it.
Score
0
February 12, 2013 3:08:26 AM

calmstateofmind said:
Would you care to elaborate then? I worked for Verizon for over a year, as well as T-Mobile for over a year, so if you know something that I don't please tell me.

Pretty much the only thing that can be done with an IMEI is to restrict it from being used once the associated device is reported lost/stolen, the account goes delinquent, or the line in which the device resides on is suspended (of which the line can be unsuspended by simply changing the active device, and activating it).

Well I don't know the exact details but from what I know...

Every time you make a call, message or use gprs/edge etc your carrier logs the IMEI and a unique id within the sim card. This unique id is associated with customer's mobile no.
The telecom provider can then easily pull this data and identify the customer from the records-his name,address etc.
It then becomes very easy to track down that person using the phone-unless he is on run or provided misleading information when getting a connection in first place.

Some other data is also logged like signal strength and cell id every time the cell radio requests connection to carrier e.g when phone is switched on
This can be used to trace the approximate location of the phone.

You can submit a request to all telecom service providers to "watch" a particular IMEI and alert you when it's "alive" on a network instead of blocking it. They can provide you with all the information you need to locate the lost mobile.
Most of the time the telecom service providers are plain unwilling to provide this information due to "privacy policies" unless it's for legal purposes eg in murder investigation.
So they just block the IMEI if you provide sufficient proof of ownership of lost mobile phone.
Score
0
February 12, 2013 3:24:44 AM

I'm sorry, but you're misinformed. Like I said, I do know the exact details, because I've worked in the cellphone industry for several years and have dealt with probably 100-150 cases of this over the course of roughly 3 years.

Carriers don't put near that much resources into tracking lost phones. All they can tell is what tower you're running off of (as well as the towers you've previously been on, but only up to a certain point), the signal strength of your device to the tower (only if it's active), the services you're enrolled in for that line, and the given stuff (personal info like name, address, etc.).

The average cell tower has a radius of 3mi, so that, in combination with the signal strength, will only give a vague estimate as to where the phone is located. The GPS is pretty much the only tool that can be used to "pin-point" where a phone is, which is what the location services I previously mentioned utilize to locate the phone.

If it's your phone, there's no issue with privacy issues because it's your phone and service. The best thing to do to prevent your phone from being lost is to enroll in a location service that uses GPS so you can then get online from your computer and view where you phone is...of course, this is assuming that you're phone is on and hasn't already been wiped.
Score
0
February 12, 2013 6:23:27 AM

calmstateofmind said:
I'm sorry, but you're misinformed. Like I said, I do know the exact details, because I've worked in the cellphone industry for several years and have dealt with probably 100-150 cases of this over the course of roughly 3 years.

Dude, did you even read what I said?

calmstateofmind said:
Carriers don't put near that much resources into tracking lost phones. All they can tell is what tower you're running off of (as well as the towers you've previously been on, but only up to a certain point), the signal strength of your device to the tower (only if it's active), the services you're enrolled in for that line, and the given stuff (personal info like name, address,etc.).

If your phone is lost there is a good chance someone else found it and is already using it.
From IMEI and IMSI, service providers can tell you who is using your phone and the subscribers mob no. which you can use to contact that person and request him to return it!

calmstateofmind said:
The average cell tower has a radius of 3mi, so that, in combination with the signal strength, will only give a vague estimate as to where the phone is located. The GPS is pretty much the only tool that can be used to "pin-point" where a phone is, which is what the location services I previously mentioned utilize to locate the phone.

Did I say you could pin-point where the phone is?
All I said that was you can get the approximate location. Also you can get a better idea of location if you use more than 3 towers

calmstateofmind said:
If it's your phone, there's no issue with privacy issues because it's your phone and service. The best thing to do to prevent your phone from being lost is to enroll in a location service that uses GPS so you can then get online from your computer and view where you phone is...of course, this is assuming that you're phone is on and hasn't already been wiped.

Even if your phone is wiped the IMEI number stays the same and can be monitored by the Service providers!
Unless it was specifically changed-which is much harder than a simple wipe.
Score
0
February 12, 2013 12:15:10 PM

When I said personal info, I was referring to the original owner, not the person who found/stole/is currently using the phone. The carrier will not give out the cell phone number that the device is currently being used on, at all. Never, ever, have I heard of that happening. I could be wrong, but like I said, I've probably had 100 something people come in that I've dealt with personally to assist them in recovering their phone, which consists of looking at their account, calling customer service, calling our own special support that customers can't reach, and still having no luck; and not to mention every other rep that I work with also sharing the same experience as me, and me even being trained under said information. So...

It's funny how you say you don't know the exact details, yet here you are trying to give exact details.
Score
0
February 12, 2013 12:31:44 PM

pranay_66 said:
plz help me


give me your credit card number and I will send you my lost cell phone tracker & imei finder
Score
0
February 12, 2013 1:48:42 PM

calmstateofmind said:
When I said personal info, I was referring to the original owner, not the person who found/stole/is currently using the phone. The carrier will not give out the cell phone number that the device is currently being used on, at all. Never, ever, have I heard of that happening. I could be wrong, but like I said, I've probably had 100 something people come in that I've dealt with personally to assist them in recovering their phone, which consists of looking at their account, calling customer service, calling our own special support that customers can't reach, and still having no luck; and not to mention every other rep that I work with also sharing the same experience as me, and me even being trained under said information. So...

It's funny how you say you don't know the exact details, yet here you are trying to give exact details.

When I say I don't know the exact details, I meant I didn't have "technical knowledge" regarding it.
But I do have a "general" idea how the process works which is what I'm trying to explain.

The service provider has to know the mob no of the customer to facilitate billing,tariff etc
But the sim card itself doesn't store the mob no of the owner, instead it has the IMSI(and some few other codes i have no idea about).
This IMSI is associated to the mob number and therefore can be used to identify the subscriber.(IMSI>Mob no>Owner info)

Have you ever lost a mob phone and had to request for a new sim but still have the same number?
What do you think the carrier does in this case?
The carrier removes the old IMSI from the records and then associates a new one to your number and gives you that new sim card which has that IMSI coded in it.

And as you know the IMEI is also registered by the carrier.
So if your mobile is lost/stolen and being used by someone else, by using IMEI the carrier can get the IMSI then the associated mob no and hence the current owner info.

If you still have doubt just google for this stuff
Score
0
February 12, 2013 2:23:14 PM

_kaos_ said:
If you still have doubt just google for this stuff


I don't need to...I used to work for the cell phone companies.

Experience > Google.
Score
0
February 12, 2013 3:06:53 PM

calmstateofmind said:
I don't need to...I used to work for the cell phone companies.

Experience > Google.

So you are going to ignore that weath of information out there just because you have some experience? :o 
Even if you discard 99.99% of that information as false, rest of it is accurate and is more than what an individual can acquire throughout his lifetime...
Your experience doesn't change a thing. It's subjective.
knowledge>>>>experience
Score
0
February 13, 2013 12:35:29 AM

Where do you think knowledge comes from? Experience.
Score
0
February 13, 2013 12:42:05 AM

pranay_66 said:
plz help me


If you have an Android phone with a data plan you can remotely download an app called "Android Lost", otherwise you're pretty much out of luck.
Score
0
February 13, 2013 12:53:30 AM

Lol the carrier won't do jack to help you locate your phone. You are not worth the resources. I tried asking them to help before and they said they are unable to do anything unless it was for a criminal investigation or something important.

A few years ago, my phone got stolen. The moron still used my sim card to call, so all of the numbers he called were logged. I just asked my friend to call the numbers logged and asked who they were talking to. We got a name and then turned it to the police. The guy went to my school so it was easy to track him down. A few days later, I got my phone back.
Score
0
February 13, 2013 12:55:49 AM

_kaos_ said:
So you are going to ignore that weath of information out there just because you have some experience? :o 
Even if you discard 99.99% of that information as false, rest of it is accurate and is more than what an individual can acquire throughout his lifetime...
Your experience doesn't change a thing. It's subjective.
knowledge>>>>experience

Not everything on the internet is true. Sometimes Experience > google.
Score
0
February 13, 2013 1:02:26 AM

Pay as you go sim's have no customer detail with them, so that would stop any carrier from finding it.

The OP lost their phone, I cite the precedent setting case of Finders vs Keepers, and Losers vs Weepers. The carrier has no legal obligation to violate someone else's rights based off you saying you lost your phone.
Score
0
February 13, 2013 2:40:05 AM

Azn Cracker said:
Not everything on the internet is true. Sometimes Experience > google.


Thank you. And where do the Internet articles come from? Other people's experiences. Lol.
Score
0
February 13, 2013 3:49:02 AM

Azn Cracker said:
Not everything on the internet is true. Sometimes Experience > google.

lol! I know not everything on internet is true. That's why I said 99.99% false and rest as accurate!
calmstateofmind said:
Where do you think knowledge comes from? Experience.

Quote:
Thank you. And where do the Internet articles come from? Other people's experiences. Lol.

And yet you are still refuse to "learn" from it!
It's impossible that any individual can experience everything that is out there .
So you have to be to open-minded and learn whatever you can from others, especially that which you can't experience yourself!!

This is going off-topic so I will stop here...
For time-being, I will stick with I know till I find a credible source that says otherwise...
But even then I will probably remain paranoid that the feds can know who you are and track you just from the IMEI.
:) 
Score
0
February 13, 2013 3:57:51 AM

Why would I need to try to learn from random internet articles that aren't even trustworthy when I experienced it myself (100+ times) over the course of several years? I don't need to scour the internet to pretend I know what I'm talking about...because I already know what I'm talking about.

And if I'm not a credible source for this topic based off my work history, I don't know who the hell else would be. :pt1cable:  :lol: 

Edit: And the other people's experiences that I did learn from was the other 50+ reps that I worked with, including my managers, plus monthly trainings/meetings, etc.

Real life experiences, real life customers, real life knowledge. I don't know how a few internet articles/forums can even begin to contest with that.
Score
0
February 13, 2013 4:40:42 AM

calmstateofmind said:
Why would I need to try to learn from random internet articles that aren't even trustworthy when I experienced it myself (100+ times) over the course of several years? I don't need to scour the internet to pretend I know what I'm talking about...because I already know what I'm talking about.

And if I'm not a credible source for this topic based off my work history, I don't know who the hell else would be. :pt1cable:  :lol: 

Edit: And the other people's experiences that I did learn from was the other 50+ reps that I worked with, including my managers, plus monthly trainings/meetings, etc.

Real life experiences, real life customers, real life knowledge. I don't know how a few internet articles/forums can even begin to contest with that.

You feel offended learning from random internet articles that aren't trustworthy written by people pretending to know what they are talking about , but you yourself forget that to majority of people you are also a random person on the internet claiming to be a credible source!!

And FYI, I have seen real-life reports on TV where the murderer was identified and tracked from the IMEI of the victims cellphone which the culprit unwittingly used (different SIM).
If you are so credible, pray tell me how was this possible?

And plz don't go on saying that everything on TV is also false!!
If every source of information out there provides false information, I won't know what to trust and this, by definition, includes you!! :pt1cable: 
Score
0
February 13, 2013 9:42:18 AM

_kaos_ said:
You feel offended learning from random internet articles that aren't trustworthy written by people pretending to know what they are talking about , but you yourself forget that to majority of people you are also a random person on the internet claiming to be a credible source!!

And FYI, I have seen real-life reports on TV where the murderer was identified and tracked from the IMEI of the victims cellphone which the culprit unwittingly used (different SIM).
If you are so credible, pray tell me how was this possible?

And plz don't go on saying that everything on TV is also false!!
If every source of information out there provides false information, I won't know what to trust and this, by definition, includes you!! :pt1cable: 


CSI is NOT real...
Score
0

Best solution

February 13, 2013 11:43:54 AM

13thmonkey said:
CSI is NOT real...

lol!! I don't even watch CSI!!
I am talking about a social-awareness program which re-enacts real crimes committed by real people and how they were caught by the real police because the victim(or in some cases the family member) was persistent enough to seek justice- not some fictional detective series.
True some elements(like names) were modified to protect privacy but rest of it is real.
Share
May 16, 2013 6:47:18 AM

calmstateofmind said:
Even if you had the IMEI, you still wouldn't be able to locate your phone.

If you want to get your IMEI, you can just contact your carrier and they can tell you, as it's clearly listed in your account details.


Score
0
January 12, 2014 10:52:56 AM

calmstateofmind said:
Even if you had the IMEI, you still wouldn't be able to locate your phone.

If you want to get your IMEI, you can just contact your carrier and they can tell you, as it's clearly listed in your account details.


Score
0
!