Access Point

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I have an 802.11g network in my house however the signal degrades as I
move into the basement. Could I drop in an access point in the basement
to boost the signal?
12 answers Last reply
More about access point
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On 18 Oct 2004 08:11:13 -0700, "just1coder@yahoo.ca"
    <just1coder@yahoo.ca> wrote:

    >I have an 802.11g network in my house however the signal degrades as I
    >move into the basement. Could I drop in an access point in the basement
    >to boost the signal?

    Yep. However, you have some options and complications.

    1. Access point and CAT5 cable back to the 802.11g upstairs router.
    SSID is same on the access point and the upstairs router. Channel
    should be different to avoid interference in the middle.

    2. Router downstairs, with DHCP disabled, and the WAN port not used.
    That turns it into an access point and the same as #1. You'll find
    that many routers are cheaper than access points (due to sales volume)
    and also include a handy built in ethernet switch.

    3. Access point using WDS (wireless distribution something) to act as
    a store-n-forward packet repeater. No need for a CAT5 run to
    upstairs. Must be same manufacturer and compatible model with your
    unspecified upstairs router. Both devices need to support WDS. Cuts
    bandwidth of downstairs users in half because everything gets sent
    over the air twice.

    4. Long run of cheap junk CATV coax between 2nd antenna port on
    upstairs router and an antenna in the basement. The coax loss will be
    huge and horrible, but less than the loss through the floors and
    walls. I just did this with a handy 10ft RG-6/u run at a neighbors
    house, who had aluminium foil backed insulation in the floors. Not as
    good as an access point, but really cheap. The antenna was just
    12.5cm of center conductor exposed and a crude ground plane made from
    aluminium duct tape. Hanging the antenna from the ceiling kept the
    coax loss to a minimum.


    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On 18 Oct 2004 08:11:13 -0700, "just1coder@yahoo.ca"
    <just1coder@yahoo.ca> wrote:

    >I have an 802.11g network in my house however the signal degrades as I
    >move into the basement. Could I drop in an access point in the basement
    >to boost the signal?
    Maybe, depends on whether you can get wires down there or not. I
    couldn't so I had to buy 2 Access Points(AP) and had to hook them up
    in bridge mode. That means that one AP is upstairs plugged directly
    into the router and the second AP is in the basement plugged into a
    hub that the other computers down there plug into. The computers in
    the basement then connect thru the AP in the basement to the AP
    upstairs wirelessly and everything is fine.
    One thing about APs though is that you MUST buy the same brand as your
    router or you could have compatability problems. There ARE exceptions
    to this rule, but if you can, just buy the same brand and you won't
    have compatability issues.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Some cheap things to try,

    Point your antenna down.

    Set your upstairs AP closer to the floor and point the antenna down.


    <just1coder@yahoo.ca> wrote in message
    news:1098112273.711346.3300@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > I have an 802.11g network in my house however the signal degrades as I
    > move into the basement. Could I drop in an access point in the basement
    > to boost the signal?
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Could I setup an existing wireless router to act as an access point?
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On 21 Oct 2004 12:17:25 -0700, in alt.internet.wireless ,
    "just1coder@yahoo.ca" <just1coder@yahoo.ca> wrote:

    >Could I setup an existing wireless router to act as an access point?

    Yes, just plug one of its LAN ports into your other (wired) router, and
    disable any DHCP services it might have.
    --
    Mark McIntyre
    CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
    CLC readme: <http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt>
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    That's it? :) Great!! It will just pick up the signal from the upstairs
    router? I don't have to enter the SSID, or the WEP key?
  7. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On 22 Oct 2004 07:20:45 -0700, in alt.internet.wireless , "J1C"
    <just1coder@yahoo.ca> wrote:

    >That's it? :) Great!! It will just pick up the signal from the upstairs
    >router? I don't have to enter the SSID, or the WEP key?

    Whoa there!
    An access point is a point on your wired network where wireless PCs connect
    to. Your 'upstairs router' is one of these.

    Sounds like what you are trying to do is have one router talk to the other
    by wireless, to connect two wired networks together. And possibly then
    rebroadcast wirelessly to wireless PCs.

    You can't do that - you'd need a wireless bridge and separate wireless AP.
    Some routers can be switched into bridging mode but then they can't be
    access points at the same time.
    --
    Mark McIntyre
    CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
    CLC readme: <http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt>
  8. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Aaaaah gotcha. I thought that was too easy :)

    What I am trying to do is to grab the signal from one room, and
    rebroadcast it out to the rest of the house.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Yeah. That's pretty much what I'm looking to do... so, in short... all
    I need is an AP that supports bridging OR a bridge ? :) It seems that
    APs w/ bridging support are far less expensive that bridges themselves.
    tx!
  10. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    I will give it a short and post my results :)
  11. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On 25 Oct 2004 07:24:41 -0700, "J1C" <just1coder@yahoo.ca> wrote:

    >Aaaaah gotcha. I thought that was too easy :)
    >
    >What I am trying to do is to grab the signal from one room, and
    >rebroadcast it out to the rest of the house.

    I am doing a similar thing here with Belkin 802.11g Access Points.

    I have 3 points in my house that are "wired" (but not wired together,
    they are run from isolated switches)

    1. Where my ADSL enters the house to a wired router and watchguard
    firebox
    2. In my office (a converted bedroom)
    3. In the detatched garage which houses some of the "noisier" servers

    I have a Belkin 54g Access Point plugged into a switch at each wired
    location, with the AP's configured in bridging mode.

    This is working fine, with good throughput even to the external garage
    which is by far the weakest signal. All machines in each of the 3
    locations can access each other.

    I also have a further PC in the house with a PCI wireless card and a
    laptop which has a PCMCIA wireless card. I can connect to any of the
    access points with these PC/Laptop and access any of the machines on
    the wired networks through any of the the AP's

    On these AP's, I had to use the same wireless channel and the same WEP
    configuration on each AP for them to be able to bridge with each
    other.

    I have 2 people that constantly access servers from each of the 3
    locations all day and touch-wood have never had a problem (other than
    self inflicted ones of course :))

    Sorry if I have misunderstood your thread, but it seems you are trying
    to do something similar? Just my .2p

    Kind Regards,

    Robin.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On 26 Oct 2004 09:09:52 -0700, "J1C" <just1coder@yahoo.ca> wrote:

    >Yeah. That's pretty much what I'm looking to do... so, in short... all
    >I need is an AP that supports bridging OR a bridge ? :) It seems that
    >APs w/ bridging support are far less expensive that bridges themselves.
    >tx!

    I can speak only of what I have setup, I am not a wireless expert by
    any means, and there are far more qualified people on here that can
    give you better advice.

    However, I do know my setup is working, the Access Points I used are
    Belkin F5D7130uk's :
    http://catalog.belkin.com/IWCatProductPage.process?Merchant_Id=&Section_Id=201576&pcount=&Product_Id=141071&Section.Section_Path=%2FRoot%2FNetworking%2FWirelessNetworking%2F80211gWi%2E%2E%2Etworking%2F

    Those models are for the UK, but am sure they will do a version for
    most countries. I got all Belkin gear (PCI/PCMCIA cards) - I assumed
    that I would stand a better chance of it all working that way.

    They sell over here for about £45 (GBP) (which is around $82 USD)

    Hope you get it all working :)

    Robin
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