Anyone know if Belkin Pre-n router offers advantage to peo..

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

What if I get a new laptop that has a built in 802.11G and then buy
one of these Belkin pre-n routers. Is there any difference to be had?
I would think not since the pre-n would have to fall back to 802.11g
but perhaps there is some gain.
Would like to know.

Thanks, Patty
14 answers Last reply
More about anyone belkin router offers advantage
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Per Belkin, there is an advantage in a mixed b and g environment, as
    apparently the pre-n does not fall back to lower speeds like the g does in
    similar situations. Best to read the Belink Pre-n documents.

    --
    Bob Alston

    bobalston9 AT aol DOT com
    "Patty Amas" <pattyjamas@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:e5e9337.0410251623.14cb194@posting.google.com...
    > What if I get a new laptop that has a built in 802.11G and then buy
    > one of these Belkin pre-n routers. Is there any difference to be had?
    > I would think not since the pre-n would have to fall back to 802.11g
    > but perhaps there is some gain.
    > Would like to know.
    >
    > Thanks, Patty


    ---
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  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Thanks. Wish some real users who bought this would chime in.
    Thanks
    Patty

    "Bob Alston" <bobalston9NOSPAM@aol.com> wrote in message news:<lnifd.119397$Lo6.75135@fed1read03>...
    > Per Belkin, there is an advantage in a mixed b and g environment, as
    > apparently the pre-n does not fall back to lower speeds like the g does in
    > similar situations. Best to read the Belink Pre-n documents.
    >
    > --
    > Bob Alston
    >
    > bobalston9 AT aol DOT com
    > "Patty Amas" <pattyjamas@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:e5e9337.0410251623.14cb194@posting.google.com...
    > > What if I get a new laptop that has a built in 802.11G and then buy
    > > one of these Belkin pre-n routers. Is there any difference to be had?
    > > I would think not since the pre-n would have to fall back to 802.11g
    > > but perhaps there is some gain.
    > > Would like to know.
    > >
    > > Thanks, Patty
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    > Version: 6.0.782 / Virus Database: 528 - Release Date: 10/22/2004
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Patty Amas Wrote:
    > Thanks. Wish some real users who bought this would chime in.
    > Thanks
    > Patty
    >

    Patty -

    After months of tinkering with DLink super G (DI-624, dwl-g650 and
    dwl-g520) with varying degrees of success, I just today bought a Belkin
    F5d8230-4 along with a notebood and PC version of their pre-N NIC's.

    In a word: superb! Range, speed and signal strength all blow away the
    best I've ever seen with D-Link's super G. Also - the router tested out
    to be very compatible with my D-Link dwl-g520 and dwl-g650 in "normal
    G" mode, with an excellent signal and good bandwidth.

    Overall, this appears to be a well thought out and well executed
    product, despite being brand new.


    --
    jonazen
    brought to you by http://www.wifi-forum.com/
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Glad to hear that you have good result from your pre-N wireless
    router. May I ask you one question:

    - Have you ever tried the reset button at the bottom of the router?

    - Do you need to use a pin or a paper clip to press down the reset
    bottom?

    - Was this easy for you to press down the reset button with a paper
    clip?

    - What did the router respond when you hit the reset button? Did the
    LCD start blinking?

    I am having trouble with my Belkin pre-N wireless router. For some
    reason, using a paper clip to press down the reset button doesn't seem
    to do anything. Therefore, I want to see if mine is a lemon or
    something. Unfortunately, the tech support didn't know much about how
    the reset button works because the router is too new and they don't
    have a picture on it on files. I am still waiting for a replacement
    unit from Belkin. While I am waiting for the replacement, I would like
    to learn how to reset button works and what I should expect when I
    press down the reset button.

    Thanks in advance for any info.

    Jay Chan
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Patty -

    Just realized that I didn't address your question directly. I probably
    should have tested actual throughput with the DLink router talking to
    the DLink pc card vs. the Belkin pre-n router talking to the DLink pc
    card - but I didn't.

    A couple of issues involved here:

    If you're actually getting better-than-G throughput due to a
    proprietary mechanism such as Atheros "super g" or Broadcom
    "afterburner", then it's quite possible that throughput between a new
    Belkin pre-n router and your legacy "g" card will be slower than it was
    with the proprietary technology.

    If, however, you're using "standard G", at 54 mbps signaling rate, then
    I believe you'll actually see better results with the new Belkin router
    than you would with your old standard G router talking to your legacy G
    card -- although I can't swear to it. It would have been interesting to
    try that out.

    When I first installed the Belkin pre-N router, I left my old D-Link
    "super g" cards in my wireless pc's. Everything connected up very
    quickly, and it felt - subjectively - that the connection was
    significantly quicker than it had been with the DLink di-624 running at
    a claimed 108 mbps signalling rate. But it was when I installed the
    Belkin "pre-N" card in the pc that I saw the really dramatic
    improvement in speed that's promised by the Airgo mimo "pre-N"
    technology in the Belkin router.

    I know this probably won't talk to the 802.11n standard that will be
    finalized in the next 18 to 24 months. But as far as I'm concerned, at
    the minimum, it's a souped-up proprietary "super G", no different in
    the compatibility issue than Broadcom's afterburner or Atheros super g.
    None of the proprietary speed-boosting G technologies will "talk" to
    the eventual "n" standard at anything other than standard "g" rates.
    Belkin's version is somewhat pricier than the others -- but it's much
    faster and has better range -- and the difference in performance is
    worth the difference in price for me, and the compatibility issues are
    NO different than you'd see with ANY proprietary enhanced "g"
    technology.

    Last note - more directly in answer to your question about improvement
    with legacy network adapters:

    The Belkin wireless connection to my old Dlink dwl-g520 wireless card
    proved to be more stable than the Dlink di-624 connection to the same
    card.


    --
    jonazen
    brought to you by http://www.wifi-forum.com/
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Jay -

    I haven't tried the reset button yet, but I'm guessing that this is a
    pretty basic microswitch. I looked at the hole on the bottom labeled,
    "reset". In my experience, sometimes if you use something as thin as a
    paperclip, it might actually slip alongside the microswitch when you
    insert it in the hole, instead of depressing it.

    If you have an oversized paperclip (about twice the size of a normal
    one), or a thin nail or brad, that might work better. Be sure to insert
    it *straight* into the hole so it can't slip to the side of the
    recessed button.

    Also - from what I read in the Belkin documentation, pressing the
    switch momentarily will do a simple reset - probably the same effect as
    if you simply selected Reboot in the web-based configuration utility.
    If you want to reset to factory settings, you're supposed to depress
    the switch for at least 10 seconds before releasing it.


    --
    jonazen
    brought to you by http://www.wifi-forum.com/
  7. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    > ... In my experience, sometimes if you use something as thin as a
    > paperclip, it might actually slip alongside the microswitch when you
    > insert it in the hole, instead of depressing it.
    >
    > If you have an oversized paperclip (about twice the size of a normal
    > one), or a thin nail or brad, that might work better. Be sure to insert
    > it *straight* into the hole so it can't slip to the side of the
    > recessed button.

    Thanks for the suggestion.

    I am almost ready to return it today. The Belkin tech support losed
    the record of the conversation; therefore, they don't know that they
    are supposed to send me a replacement unit.

    I will try your tip to reset the router one more time with a brad nail
    when I get back home. If this still doesn't work, I will have to
    return it tomorrow.

    Jay Chan
  8. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    > If you have an oversized paperclip (about twice the size of a normal
    > one), or a thin nail or brad, that might work better. Be sure to insert
    > it *straight* into the hole so it can't slip to the side of the
    > recessed button.

    No luck. Last evening I used a finish-nail to press down the reset
    button, and I surely felt the button toggling down. But the router
    still didn't work (the installation program no longer recognize the
    router).

    I will return the router today before the refund period expires.

    Thanks for the suggestion anyway.

    Jay Chan
  9. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Jay,

    To restore the factory defaults, you have to follow what I have
    written below. The Belkin manual is wrong. Apparently they know about
    the problem and are going to fix it.

    1. Power down the Router
    2. Press and hold the reset switch.
    3. Continue to hold the switch in and connect power again. Keep
    holding the switch for 5 seconds.
    4. The Router will boot up with the factory settings.

    Kinda lame way to do it, but they say they are going to fix it.

    jaykchan@hotmail.com (Jay Chan) wrote in message news:<c7e5acb2.0411100737.9dd50c1@posting.google.com>...
    > > If you have an oversized paperclip (about twice the size of a normal
    > > one), or a thin nail or brad, that might work better. Be sure to insert
    > > it *straight* into the hole so it can't slip to the side of the
    > > recessed button.
    >
    > No luck. Last evening I used a finish-nail to press down the reset
    > button, and I surely felt the button toggling down. But the router
    > still didn't work (the installation program no longer recognize the
    > router).
    >
    > I will return the router today before the refund period expires.
    >
    > Thanks for the suggestion anyway.
    >
    > Jay Chan
  10. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Jay Chan Wrote:
    > > No luck. Last evening I used a finish-nail to press down the reset
    > button, and I surely felt the button toggling down. But the router
    > still didn't work (the installation program no longer recognize the
    > router).
    >
    > Jay Chan

    Sorry to hear that it didn't work. I know that having a positive
    experience with SOHO WiFi equipment is largely a matter of luck. So far
    (only 3 days), my Belkin pre-n equipment has been working perfectly.
    Got my fingers crossed, hoping that it will prove to be more stable in
    the long run than my DLink setup was.

    Good luck Jay.


    --
    jonazen
    brought to you by http://www.wifi-forum.com/
  11. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Jay (and wirelessnetguy) -

    Interesting - that's virtually the same way that DLink (and I believe
    Linksys) let you restore a router to a "pristine" factory default
    state. In DLink's case (as with the di-624 rev Cx), you hold in the
    reset button, unplug the power, continue holding in the reset button
    while powering up and for an additional 10 seconds. This does what they
    call a "crash recovery" process -- it actually wipes the firmware in
    the DLink router, and when it comes back to the life, the router screen
    requests you to point to a firmware image to load into it.

    One thing I noticed that's different between Belkin and DLink's
    approach to this is that Belkin actually specs a separate piece of
    firmware to manage the initial boot up of the router that's apparently
    separate from the user-loadable firmware image. For example, on the
    status screen on for my F5D8230-4, I see that the "Boot Version" is
    2.01.08, while the "Firmware Version" is 1.00.06.


    --
    jonazen
    brought to you by http://www.wifi-forum.com/
  12. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    > To restore the factory defaults, you have to follow what I have
    > written below. The Belkin manual is wrong. Apparently they know about
    > the problem and are going to fix it.
    >
    > 1. Power down the Router
    > 2. Press and hold the reset switch.
    > 3. Continue to hold the switch in and connect power again. Keep
    > holding the switch for 5 seconds.
    > 4. The Router will boot up with the factory settings.
    >
    > Kinda lame way to do it, but they say they are going to fix it.

    Actually, I have known about this. One of the Belkin tech support told
    me something like yours already. The steps are slightly different
    though:

    1. Hold the reset switch for 15 seconds.
    2. Power down the Router while keep holding down the
    reset switch.
    3. Continue to hold the switch in and connect power again.
    Keep holding the switch for 15 seconds.
    4. The Router "is supposed to" boot up with the factory
    settings.

    The differences between what they told me and what they told you are:
    - My version requires me to press down the switch while I am
    powering it down.
    - They want me to hold a down for 15 seconds instead of just
    5 seconds.

    I have no idea which way is the "TRUE" way to reset that pre-N router.
    Anyway, I already returned the router (CompUSA didn't give me any
    problem as long as I purchased stuff from them). I am in the process
    of wiring most of my house using cat.6 cable and a Gigabit switch. I
    will revisit the wireless situation when the official 802.11n comes
    out in 2006, and I will use it to cover areas in my house where I
    cannot run wire into.

    Jay Chan
  13. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    You are correct. The Belkin router uses a Linux kernel and the
    bootloader is the same CFE (Common Freeware Environment) available
    freely over the net. The Router is using a Broadcom microprocessor
    (BCM4704) to perform the routing functions. From my understanding, the
    firmware image stays in the NVRAM of the router and is simply
    re-written to the flash memory during the restore process.

    jonazen <jonazen.1fl8ab@no-mx.forums.yourdomain.com.au> wrote in message news:<jonazen.1fl8ab@no-mx.forums.yourdomain.com.au>...
    > Jay (and wirelessnetguy) -
    >
    > Interesting - that's virtually the same way that DLink (and I believe
    > Linksys) let you restore a router to a "pristine" factory default
    > state. In DLink's case (as with the di-624 rev Cx), you hold in the
    > reset button, unplug the power, continue holding in the reset button
    > while powering up and for an additional 10 seconds. This does what they
    > call a "crash recovery" process -- it actually wipes the firmware in
    > the DLink router, and when it comes back to the life, the router screen
    > requests you to point to a firmware image to load into it.
    >
    > One thing I noticed that's different between Belkin and DLink's
    > approach to this is that Belkin actually specs a separate piece of
    > firmware to manage the initial boot up of the router that's apparently
    > separate from the user-loadable firmware image. For example, on the
    > status screen on for my F5D8230-4, I see that the "Boot Version" is
    > 2.01.08, while the "Firmware Version" is 1.00.06.
  14. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Thanks all. Great info. I may soon buy one of these units.
    Patty J


    jaykchan@hotmail.com (Jay Chan) wrote in message news:<c7e5acb2.0411120825.290c94da@posting.google.com>...
    > > To restore the factory defaults, you have to follow what I have
    > > written below. The Belkin manual is wrong. Apparently they know about
    > > the problem and are going to fix it.
    > >
    > > 1. Power down the Router
    > > 2. Press and hold the reset switch.
    > > 3. Continue to hold the switch in and connect power again. Keep
    > > holding the switch for 5 seconds.
    > > 4. The Router will boot up with the factory settings.
    > >
    > > Kinda lame way to do it, but they say they are going to fix it.
    >
    > Actually, I have known about this. One of the Belkin tech support told
    > me something like yours already. The steps are slightly different
    > though:
    >
    > 1. Hold the reset switch for 15 seconds.
    > 2. Power down the Router while keep holding down the
    > reset switch.
    > 3. Continue to hold the switch in and connect power again.
    > Keep holding the switch for 15 seconds.
    > 4. The Router "is supposed to" boot up with the factory
    > settings.
    >
    > The differences between what they told me and what they told you are:
    > - My version requires me to press down the switch while I am
    > powering it down.
    > - They want me to hold a down for 15 seconds instead of just
    > 5 seconds.
    >
    > I have no idea which way is the "TRUE" way to reset that pre-N router.
    > Anyway, I already returned the router (CompUSA didn't give me any
    > problem as long as I purchased stuff from them). I am in the process
    > of wiring most of my house using cat.6 cable and a Gigabit switch. I
    > will revisit the wireless situation when the official 802.11n comes
    > out in 2006, and I will use it to cover areas in my house where I
    > cannot run wire into.
    >
    > Jay Chan
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