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3D Displays May Be Hazardous to Young Children

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July 9, 2010 1:35:49 PM

it makes sense. When I was a kid, kids used to actually play outside and be active. Most of the outdoor sports we played were in fact in 3D, and were quite hazardous. We would end up sore, sweaty, and in good physical shape. Definitely not something today's youth is ready for
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July 9, 2010 1:39:36 PM

That's why 3D using special glasses is a bad idea. Holograms are the future.
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July 9, 2010 1:45:50 PM

Of course it's got a bad effect, it alters what hits the retina.

But in the meantime, has everyone forgotten that the 3DS' effect can be turned off?
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July 9, 2010 1:58:00 PM

Yup, so if you don't want your kids playing in 3D just turn the 3d off. Simple as that. Also I remember having one of those 3d headset things lol. It was heavy enough putting it on.
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July 9, 2010 2:00:15 PM

I can understand why active shutter glasses might cause harm, but not sure why VR and polarized lenses would.

With active shutter, you actually prevent an eye from seeing the image it's not meant to see, so it doesn't really use the brain's stereoscopic function "properly". But other technologies send images to both eyes at the same time... is it because it causes the eye to focus on some "fake" focal point?
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July 9, 2010 2:05:22 PM

Young children should be running around outside anyways.
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July 9, 2010 2:12:00 PM

I think the issue would stem from the "tricks" movie makers use to make certain parts of the image jump way out of the screen (more then normal).

Its not generating a true stereoscopic image as the brain would normally see. If your brain is still learning how to interpret stereoscopic images and it starts seeing unrealistic ones then it will start creating neurological paths for these special instances as if they were real. This could harm your normal visions interpretations.

So if your brains pathways are already set, it won't bother you. If you're young and still building them then you could risk building ones tuned to movies and not real life.
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July 9, 2010 2:13:34 PM

ZentharI can understand why active shutter glasses might cause harm, but not sure why VR and polarized lenses would.With active shutter, you actually prevent an eye from seeing the image it's not meant to see, so it doesn't really use the brain's stereoscopic function "properly". But other technologies send images to both eyes at the same time... is it because it causes the eye to focus on some "fake" focal point?

With polarized lenses, only 1 eye is seeing at any given time just like shutter glasses. That's why 3D movies has to be twice as bright as regular movies to gave you the effective brightness of regular movie.
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July 9, 2010 2:26:47 PM

Pei-chenWith polarized lenses, only 1 eye is seeing at any given time just like shutter glasses. That's why 3D movies has to be twice as bright as regular movies to gave you the effective brightness of regular movie.
I did some more research about polarization and it seems that even on that front there are 2 distinct technologies: one uses a single projector, the other uses two. I though they all used two projectors where each would have a different polarization (therefore my though that both eyes were getting an image, albeit a different one).
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July 9, 2010 3:03:19 PM

I would say yes of course, because if my kid touched my expensive 3d TV i would smack him over the head....Hazardous Indeed
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July 9, 2010 3:23:24 PM

Gotta love Milhouse!
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July 9, 2010 3:30:43 PM

I'd think it should be obvious that 3D TV's would be horrible for your eyes. Regular TV's and computer monitors hurt your eyes by giving them a lack of exercise, since they never have to change focus distance while you're staring at it. Now with 3D TV's, add to it the fact that your eyes will be focused on the same distance, but your brain will think it's closer. If developing children are exposed to this enough, their eyes will basically be mis-trained as to how to focus on certain distances. If they always watch the 3D tv at 10 feet away, then when they see something at 5 feet away, their eyes will try to focus closer to the 10 feet that they've been trained to focus at.
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July 9, 2010 3:51:17 PM

Makes sense one the human brain takes years after birth to finish developing.
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July 9, 2010 4:21:14 PM

Scuba Dave's rudeness aside, 3D movies have to be significantly brighter than their 2D counterparts because the polarization attenuates the light hitting your eyes. First at the projector where the active polarization takes place, then at the glasses where the passive takes place.

It's effectively adding density filters to the image, thereby reducing its overall brightness, requiring significantly brighter lamphouses to compensate.
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July 9, 2010 5:13:28 PM

scuba daveI would really like to know your logic behind that statement. Or better yet, your source of information. Because they need to be hit. Hard. Having one eye see the image at a time has NO effect on brightness. It doesn't "half" the brightness. Vision just doesn't work that way I'm afraid.On a different note.. I can understand how it could be bad for a kid.. if used too much.. but I would be interested in knowing where that line is. I'd like to think that seeing one every ONCE in a while wouldn't be bad.. but I'm certainly no expert.

Look into RealD Cinema before comment please
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July 9, 2010 5:14:12 PM

Several years ago, I worked as a 3D projectionist at an effects company using interlocked projection and polarized lenses (dual projectors). We used a silver screen to increase the brightness of the image--the polarized lenses are a bit like sunglasses, they passively absorbed some light, they also filtered out the light from the image that was meant for the other eye.
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July 9, 2010 5:26:08 PM

scuba daveI would really like to know your logic behind that statement. Or better yet, your source of information. Because they need to be hit. Hard. Having one eye see the image at a time has NO effect on brightness. It doesn't "half" the brightness. Vision just doesn't work that way I'm afraid.On a different note.. I can understand how it could be bad for a kid.. if used too much.. but I would be interested in knowing where that line is. I'd like to think that seeing one every ONCE in a while wouldn't be bad.. but I'm certainly no expert.


Interesting how you bash the opinion of another without even knowing the facts yourself.

The cinema 3D technology uses passive glasses, each lens is polarized in opposite directions blocking the light which is polarized in the wrong direction. Thus you end up with only half the actual light getting to your eyes. So yes the source has to be brighter.

With the nVidia technology the image gets darker because half the time you see the image, the other half of the time you see black when the lcd blocks the light.

So yes, both 3D technologies DO actually reduce the light getting to you, having a brighter source makes the darkening effect less noticeable. Probably the number one complaint about 3D vision is that you need to bump up your brightness and gamma values to compensate for the loss of brightness in your image...
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Anonymous
July 9, 2010 5:56:57 PM

ender - maybe "rude" wasnt the word to use in describing scuba boy. Arrogant comes to mind, however.
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July 9, 2010 6:01:02 PM

LOL. A different "A" word comes to MY mind. He completely obliterates his own credibility.

Too bad when it comes from people who might otherwise have something useful to offer when they behave so boorishly.
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July 9, 2010 6:02:42 PM

@ scuba dave

1. If you weren't "rude" originally you certainly are now (seriously, appalled vs. rude on a forum post is not a great distinction).

2. Your first post was incorrect and did misunderstand the technology -- as your focus was on what the eye sees and not on the effect of the various filters between the screen and the eye.

3. Instead of stepping up and apologizing you've chosen the decidedly immature course of doubling down on your original, wrong statement and engaging in transparent semantics to redefine what you originally said.

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July 9, 2010 6:07:25 PM

Oh, and for the record, half the light is a pretty good approximation -- it's about what a light meter reads when taken through the lens of the polarized glasses compared to when the filters are taken off the projectors.
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July 9, 2010 6:17:39 PM

Hah, I like the picture you paired with the article, nice.
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July 9, 2010 7:35:43 PM

ender, kpez, chriskrum, invlem and scuba dave, please delete your comments.
scuba dave, I agree you weren't rude in your first comment and had a point that you made without disrespecting anyone but now you are using up way too much text space. Now everyone is also replying to you instead of commenting on the article.
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July 9, 2010 8:00:42 PM

This has been a good discussion thus far. Don't turn it into a flame war.

-Moderator
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Anonymous
July 9, 2010 8:14:16 PM

On topic..Dissapointed with this news, I love going to the Cinema to watch 3d movies with my my son (4) and daughter (8) and we have been going since they have started 3d. We go at least once every couple of months, now I will have to do some research into this to see just how much of a risk it is!
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July 9, 2010 8:26:21 PM

moriconOn topic..Dissapointed with this news, I love going to the Cinema to watch 3d movies with my my son (4) and daughter (8) and we have been going since they have started 3d. We go at least once every couple of months, now I will have to do some research into this to see just how much of a risk it is!
I'm no doctor, but wearing an eye-patch hours at a time every few days while I was 5-6 years old didn't make me regain my stereoscopic vision, I don't see why 2hrs every month would screw it up. I think people are mostly "affraid" for TVs since children spend hours in front of them every day instead of enjoying the full 3D and more-than-HD world around them.
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July 9, 2010 8:46:19 PM

I can think of a couple issues with 3D and children but would be interested in more details about the current research.

One is that stereoscopic vision is the primary means be which we perceive depth but it's not the only one. Our brains use a number of visual clues as well has (up close) focus depth to augment what we see. I can imagine that tricking the eye with a stereoscopic image constantly that was really only six or seven feet away could mess up the way children learn to interpret and collate those other clues.
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July 10, 2010 1:11:50 AM

Dear God! Won't someone think of the children! Hurry up and ban those 3D displays, you obviously don't love your children if you don't agree!
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July 10, 2010 7:24:42 AM

Thank you for the warning, as many did not know lots of people are little deaf because of improper use of headphones now its the 3D gears.
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July 10, 2010 7:31:12 AM

It would be nice if little crying kids weren't allowed in to watch 3D movies at the cinema..
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July 10, 2010 12:54:46 PM

I would be intrested in seeing a comparson of 3D imaging systems on the market , active shutter , passive systems , like polarized and filter glasses types , and the system we dont hear as much about L And R continous 3D systems which show both images at the same time (using polarized glasses to seperate each image to the proper eye) , there is also head mounted displays with 2 seperate screans which can disply images to both eyes at the same time, see which system produces the best image quality and has the least eye strain and physiological issues
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July 10, 2010 5:06:15 PM

Well the kiddos wont b happy about this but its for their well being anyways kids as small as 7 shouldnt b allowed 2 much Gaming exposure they should b made go outside and play atleast would reduce the obesity rates
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July 10, 2010 5:06:38 PM

Well the kiddos wont b happy about this but its for their well being anyways kids as small as 7 shouldnt b allowed 2 much Gaming exposure they should b made go outside and play atleast would reduce the obesity rates
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July 10, 2010 5:46:04 PM

ikefuI think the issue would stem from the "tricks" movie makers use to make certain parts of the image jump way out of the screen (more then normal).Its not generating a true stereoscopic image as the brain would normally see. If your brain is still learning how to interpret stereoscopic images and it starts seeing unrealistic ones then it will start creating neurological paths for these special instances as if they were real. This could harm your normal visions interpretations.So if your brains pathways are already set, it won't bother you. If you're young and still building them then you could risk building ones tuned to movies and not real life.

Hes right. The brain tends to use "short cuts' by generating the image it expects to see rather than what you are actually seeing. Thats how optical illusions work. In small kids whose brains arent fully functoning, this can cause a lot of problems.
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July 10, 2010 11:27:41 PM

insider3Young children should be running around outside anyways.

ecnovaecit makes sense. When I was a kid, kids used to actually play outside and be active. Most of the outdoor sports we played were in fact in 3D, and were quite hazardous. We would end up sore, sweaty, and in good physical shape. Definitely not something today's youth is ready for

I love hearing parents say this while their kids are glued to their PSP's DS's or cell phones.
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July 11, 2010 3:28:02 AM

3D movies give me a bad headache and I don't get headaches. So I'm not surprised they are bad for kids.
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July 11, 2010 6:44:26 PM

The shutter glasses with different times thing has severe compromised continuity in it's input to our brain. It's amazing that this technology isn't being ditched in favour of circular polarized glasses.
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July 11, 2010 6:45:17 PM

The shutter thing has been known to cause more headaches and disorientation then polarized stuff.
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July 11, 2010 10:19:58 PM

Quote:
3D is all the rage right now


correction:

Quote:
3D is all the rage right now with clueless customers, while most of the market is absolutely apathetic about it


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July 12, 2010 10:28:04 AM

annymmo said:
The shutter thing has been known to cause more headaches and disorientation then polarized stuff.

Then I suppose you (and many others here) haven't seen this article posted back in May ("Blu-ray 3d On The PC" under the Graphics category on the main page).
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July 12, 2010 2:22:59 PM

insider3Young children should be running around outside anyways.


So young children should never watch a movie? Regardless if its 3D or not?
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July 13, 2010 12:30:13 PM

This is old news for Nintendo. When the Virtual Boy was released back in 1995, it came with a disclaimer in the box that they discouraged use by children under the age of 7 because it may suffer damage to their eyes.
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