Data Cable Query

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Greets,

I had a question about what types of experience people have had with
data cables.

Are charging data cables certified (by UL or even produced by manuf.)?
What software if any needs to be purchased?

I have looked around and there is no available mobile office kit for
the a670, but have seen a few cables around on ebay and would like to
know the differences.

Thanks in advance,
2 answers Last reply
More about data cable query
  1. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    "Eugene Lee" <erlee96@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:4479af73.0408280020.694d0306@posting.google.com...
    > Greets,
    >
    > I had a question about what types of experience people have had with
    > data cables.
    >
    > Are charging data cables certified (by UL or even produced by manuf.)?
    > What software if any needs to be purchased?
    >
    > I have looked around and there is no available mobile office kit for
    > the a670, but have seen a few cables around on ebay and would like to
    > know the differences.
    >
    > Thanks in advance,

    Everything is a flip flop, Good news bad news, nothing definate.. Some
    cables are made in the US, and some are made overseas, (as far as I know,
    neither are UL listed).

    The biggest problem with them are the rate of charge. When a phone is in
    use, it usually uses more power than the charger cable puts in, in that
    case, the manufacturer of the cable doesn't matter, since it is limited to
    what the charger puts out. There are some cables that are powered by the USB
    port, but again, it doesn't charge faster than the phone uses it when making
    a call. Normally, that wouldn't matter, especially if you make shorter data
    calls, but there have been an increasing number of instances lately of
    people downloading files (especially XP Service Pack 2), that are huge, take
    10-20 hours to download, and stop because the phone battery dies in mid
    download.

    There are basically 2 types of connections, Quick 2 Net (Q2N) and
    NationalAccess (NA). The Q2N is circuit switched (means you dial an ISP
    directly), 14.4 kb (some drivers put 19.2 on the screen and make people
    think it is really that fast). The NA is packet switched and can burst up to
    144K, but most people report 60-90K (faster than regular dial up, ergo you
    can't call a dial-up modem), a network is usually used.

    There are two main types of cables.. Serial (up to 115kb) and (USB up to
    230kb).

    In most instances you can use a standard windows driver, with any sort of
    cable, and Quick 2 Net, to do data. The software is immaterial (Mobile
    Office, Futuredial etc), you can just use a standard windows driver for low
    speed, the software only makes it pretty.

    When you try and use the higher speed 1X/Express/National Access/Packet
    Switched, things get very complicated very quick. There are phone types,
    serial or USB, cable types, use or not of compression like venturi, even if
    you have a plan that allows high speed data use at the cost of minutes of
    your plan. To use the high speed, while it is possible, the software (like
    mobile office futurdial etc) do settings automatically to make it very
    simple for the end user.

    There is a lot more, and I'm sure people here will pick this to pieces, but
    thats the basics as I understand it, fraid I can't be any more specific
    since it depends on the actual phone itself.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Peter Pan wrote:
    > Everything is a flip flop, Good news bad news, nothing definate.. Some
    > cables are made in the US, and some are made overseas, (as far as I
    > know, neither are UL listed).

    I would suggest checking that wherever you buy them from will replace
    your phone if it gets damaged by the charging.

    > The biggest problem with them are the rate of charge. When a phone is
    > in use, it usually uses more power than the charger cable puts in, in
    > that case, the manufacturer of the cable doesn't matter, since it is
    > limited to what the charger puts out.

    I do a simple test for this. Plug the phone into the charging cable,
    and take the battery out. That will show you if the phone can still
    charge while idle. You can even try making a call if you want to
    see if the phone will charge while calling.

    I currently have 7 phones on my desk. I only charge two of them
    via chargers. All the rest are only charged using charging USB
    cables. I am careful however in that I only use powered USB
    hubs or plug directly onto ports on the computers.

    Roger
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