WAL-MART WiFi

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I was told that very soon, Wal-Mart is going to offer (maybe free) WiFi at
all of there stores...

Does anyone know anything about this?

YUA
California
11 answers Last reply
More about mart wifi
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Your Uncle Albert wrote:
    > I was told that very soon, Wal-Mart is going to offer (maybe free) WiFi at
    > all of there stores...
    >
    > Does anyone know anything about this?
    >
    > YUA
    > California

    The talk that I heard was that Walmart is experimenting with providing
    fixed broadband wireless internet using wireless. I don't mean a hotspot
    in the stores, I mean trying to blanket the surrounding areas with
    wireless signal. I don't imagine that they're thinking of doing it for
    free. If they can't find a way to make it profitable, they won't do it.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Sun, 31 Oct 2004 15:16:29 GMT, "Your Uncle Albert"
    <yourunclealbert@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >I was told that very soon, Wal-Mart is going to offer (maybe free) WiFi at
    >all of there stores...
    >
    >Does anyone know anything about this?

    Yeah, but you got the story screwed up. Walmart is considering going
    into the wireless business using 802.16 WiMax, not commodity Wi-Fi.
    There was no suggestion of offering anything for free. They want to
    offer it as some sort of telecom service to customers surrounding
    their store. That was August and I haven't seen any action since.
    See:
    http://www.thefeature.com/article?articleid=100964
    http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20040809/2338238.shtml
    http://blogger.iftf.org/Future/000484.html

    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    That would be nice if the price they might charge would match the low cost
    of in-there-store prices..
    As you know many of the companies that charge for WiFi service need someone
    like Wal-Mart to
    bring the price down, since all of the other are ALL way over prices...

    Thanks for your input, and I shall keep on what I hear.

    YUA
    Northern California

    "Rôgêr" <abuse@your.isp.com> wrote in message
    news:A8udnQ7nZ-GmtxjcRVn-1A@pghconnect.com...
    > Your Uncle Albert wrote:
    >> I was told that very soon, Wal-Mart is going to offer (maybe free) WiFi
    >> at all of there stores...
    >>
    >> Does anyone know anything about this?
    >>
    >> YUA
    >> California
    >
    > The talk that I heard was that Walmart is experimenting with providing
    > fixed broadband wireless internet using wireless. I don't mean a hotspot
    > in the stores, I mean trying to blanket the surrounding areas with
    > wireless signal. I don't imagine that they're thinking of doing it for
    > free. If they can't find a way to make it profitable, they won't do it.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Thank you Jeff...

    By-the-way how's the weather down south?

    I'm up by Santa Rosa, and it's 68 and clear.

    YUA

    "Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
    news:cn9ao0dvu8a802pdpl7g3kejfiaouu0jdq@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 31 Oct 2004 15:16:29 GMT, "Your Uncle Albert"
    > <yourunclealbert@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >>I was told that very soon, Wal-Mart is going to offer (maybe free) WiFi at
    >>all of there stores...
    >>
    >>Does anyone know anything about this?
    >
    > Yeah, but you got the story screwed up. Walmart is considering going
    > into the wireless business using 802.16 WiMax, not commodity Wi-Fi.
    > There was no suggestion of offering anything for free. They want to
    > offer it as some sort of telecom service to customers surrounding
    > their store. That was August and I haven't seen any action since.
    > See:
    > http://www.thefeature.com/article?articleid=100964
    > http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20040809/2338238.shtml
    > http://blogger.iftf.org/Future/000484.html
    >
    > --
    > Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    > 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    > Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Sun, 31 Oct 2004 19:58:04 GMT, "Your Uncle Albert"
    <yourunclealbert@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >Thank you Jeff...
    >By-the-way how's the weather down south?

    It's not down. I'm at 950ft elevation. It's *UP* south.

    >I'm up by Santa Rosa, and it's 68 and clear.
    >YUA

    Same here. Very nice day. However, I've been inside since Weds. I
    caught a cold and pounding a keyboard is about the only thing I can do
    that doesn't require thinking or moving. I should be well enough
    tomorrow to go outside. Make sure you virus scanner is working so you
    don't catch my cold.

    Meanwhile, direct from Santa Cruz...
    http://ihwy.com/hwy9/forecast.html
    http://www.weather.com/weather/local/95060

    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Your Uncle Albert wrote:
    > That would be nice if the price they might charge would match the low cost
    > of in-there-store prices..
    > As you know many of the companies that charge for WiFi service need someone
    > like Wal-Mart to
    > bring the price down, since all of the other are ALL way over prices...

    Yeah, but do you want your WiFi source to be from China?

    --
    Steve
    Purple Heart Veterans against BuSh and the Chickenhawks
    * Ya Hadda Be There To Get One *

    Re-defeat Bush/Pinocheney in 2004
  7. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Sun, 31 Oct 2004 22:40:00 GMT, Steve Caple
    <stevecaple@commoncast.net> wrote:

    >Your Uncle Albert wrote:
    >> That would be nice if the price they might charge would match the low cost
    >> of in-there-store prices..
    >> As you know many of the companies that charge for WiFi service need someone
    >> like Wal-Mart to
    >> bring the price down, since all of the other are ALL way over prices...

    >Yeah, but do you want your WiFi source to be from China?

    It already is. Almost all of the bottom of the line Wi-Fi hardware
    and software comes from China, Korea, or Taiwan. If you lookup the
    FCC ID on the FCC web pile:
    https://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/prod/oet/cf/eas/reports/GenericSearch.cfm
    and dig through the test reports, you'll find that almost no wireless
    hardware is manufactured domestically.

    Welcome to the global economy.

    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
  8. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in
    news:sh4bo05b9jbq9r6hie3q1id779r28dc25q@4ax.com:

    > On Sun, 31 Oct 2004 22:40:00 GMT, Steve Caple
    ><stevecaple@commoncast.net> wrote:
    >
    >>Your Uncle Albert wrote:
    >>> That would be nice if the price they might charge would match the
    >>> low cost of in-there-store prices..
    >>> As you know many of the companies that charge for WiFi service need
    >>> someone like Wal-Mart to
    >>> bring the price down, since all of the other are ALL way over
    >>> prices...
    >
    >>Yeah, but do you want your WiFi source to be from China?
    >
    > It already is. Almost all of the bottom of the line Wi-Fi hardware
    > and software comes from China, Korea, or Taiwan. If you lookup the
    > FCC ID on the FCC web pile:
    > https://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/prod/oet/cf/eas/reports/GenericSearch.cfm
    > and dig through the test reports, you'll find that almost no wireless
    > hardware is manufactured domestically.

    Is there ANY mass produced consumer electronics product manufactured in the
    US anymore?

    Sometimes it's just really hard to 'Buy American'.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 22:18:14 -0600, DanS
    <t.h.i.s.n.t.h.a.t@a.d.e.l.p.h.i.a..n.e.t> wrote:

    >Is there ANY mass produced consumer electronics product manufactured in the
    >US anymore?

    No.

    >Sometimes it's just really hard to 'Buy American'.

    There a few web sites that offer made in America type products.
    http://www.buyamericanmart.com/index.html
    http://www.howtobuyamerican.com
    http://www.madeinusa.org
    It's fairly depressing with almost no consumer electronics listed. To
    the best of my knowledge, very little in todays computers, other than
    sophisticated or initial production components, are made in the USA.

    The problem is that if there really were consumer electronics totally
    made in the USA, the price would be so high that nobody would buy
    them. I've costed out and reverse engineered some imported electronic
    products and found that the price of the completed imported product,
    was less than the parts cost in the USA.


    --
    # Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
    # 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    # jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    # 831.421.6491 digital_pager jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
  10. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    In article <Xns9596ED95FAEBidispcom@216.196.97.142>,
    t.h.i.s.n.t.h.a.t@a.d.e.l.p.h.i.a..n.e.t says...
    > Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in
    > news:sh4bo05b9jbq9r6hie3q1id779r28dc25q@4ax.com:
    >
    > > On Sun, 31 Oct 2004 22:40:00 GMT, Steve Caple
    > ><stevecaple@commoncast.net> wrote:
    > >
    >
    > Is there ANY mass produced consumer electronics product manufactured in the
    > US anymore?
    >
    > Sometimes it's just really hard to 'Buy American'.
    >
    >

    Steve,

    I worked in engineering in the consumer electronics industry in the
    60's, and all TV's, for example, and most of everything else, was
    manfactured in the USA. The primary reason for moving everything off-
    shore was the initial price competition from Japan, but primarily the
    demand from American consumers for low prices for high-tech equipment.
    Two of the most complex, and technical, products available are the
    "simple" TV and VCR. And yet, today they are available at give-away
    prices. You can't even afford to replace any major component in either
    should something fail - it's cheaper to buy another.

    There are mass-produced electronics still made here in the USA, but for
    niche markets, certainly not the "consumer electronics market."

    Don
  11. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    <SNIP>

    >
    > There are mass-produced electronics still made here in the USA, but
    > for niche markets, certainly not the "consumer electronics market."
    >
    > Don
    >

    Which is why I think I specifically mentioned 'consumer' goods. I actually
    work for an OEM wireless data communication's company, and we fill a tiny
    niche market, mostly SCADA and remote monitoring, in narrow band (read low
    bandwidth) licensed oddball frequencies. It's truly the only market where
    our product's can survive. Market's like this are passed up by large
    manufacturer's due to the low volume and specialized nature. Where else are
    you going to get >$2k for a serial-based 19.2k baud point-to-point radio
    set (?). (rhetorical question)

    Regards,

    DanS
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