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Will this RAM be ok for this Motherboard?

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July 3, 2005 4:08:39 AM

I'm planning on buying the "EPoX EP-9NPA+Ultra ATX AMD Motherboard". I have Kingstons DDR 2GB 3200 Dual RAM, and I need to make sure that these 2 are compatible with eachother. Thanks!

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a b V Motherboard
July 3, 2005 4:36:55 AM

It's a good board, you'll want one of AMD's latest cores for your best chance of success at using large modules. For single cores, those are Venice and San Diego.

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July 3, 2005 6:00:52 AM

Err, that doesn't exactly answer my question though. I already own the RAM, I just need to know if its compatible with this motherboard before I buy it.
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a b V Motherboard
July 3, 2005 6:22:01 AM

It's the best answer anyone can give you: The A64 memory controller is on the CPU, the newer cores have better memory controller stability when using large modules. The chipset plays only a small part, and the motherboard you're considering is well-designed.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
July 3, 2005 7:33:04 AM

Well..I found the answer from a manual. A simple yes or no would have done it. Thanks anyway.
a b V Motherboard
July 3, 2005 8:10:55 AM

A simple yes or no wouldn't do it, you see guys in here reporting their configuration either working, or not, using similar hardware.

The manual should say something about forcing the memory speed down when 4 or more banks are used, that probably isn't necessary with the new cores.

The closest thing you'll get to a "Yes" is "yes, it should work with the RAM slowed to DDR333". The closest thing you'll get to a no is "no, it probably won't work with older core A64's at full DDR400 speed".

I'm serious, yes or no doesn't answer your question, in order to get your PC running its best you'll have to learn a few things.

Would someone like to back me up on this?

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
July 3, 2005 9:56:27 AM

Behind you all the Crash....

X8: Crash is exactly right in what he told you. If you get a Venice core CPU, then you shouldn't have any problems with the memory running at its rated speed. If you're running on a Winchester core, then the memory speed will be defaulted by the system to DDR333 - without asking you. Just get a Venice core CPU and you should be OK.

Why do you need so much memory? Lots of heavy-duty encoding? Most apps today won't take advantage of that amount of memory.

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July 3, 2005 4:54:08 PM

I just needed to be aware of the voltage, maybe I should have just asked what the voltage of the RAM was.

I will be recording shows, possibly 2 at a time, along with encoding, ripping, and doing whatever else I want to do, like playing video games. I may never reach using that amount of memory, but atleast I'll be fine doing whatever, whenever. I already have the RAM, I just needed to know if I needed to buy new RAm to get the motherboard.
July 3, 2005 5:45:17 PM

The easiest way to find the voltage for your particular RAM is to get the part number and search on Kingston's website for tech docs on the RAM. That being said, PC3200 (DDR400), is the standard RAM for that setup.

You'll be limited by the CPU before the RAM when doing the combo of things you're talking about. The only reason I asked is that you can actually degrade system performance by having too much RAM.

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a b V Motherboard
July 3, 2005 8:51:00 PM

You shouldn't need new RAM for this board, you should be able to get the thing working with that RAM. To avoid or fix stability issues with large modules, you pick your parts correctly or make system adjustments, or both.

1.) nForce3 250, nForce4, and SiS chipsets help stability a little.
2.) The Venice core Athlon 64 helps stability a little more
3.) Default voltage for PC3200 is 2.6v (there are some modules that want more)
4.) BIOS should detect the CPU core type, older cores will default the RAM to DDR333 for stability.
5.) The easiest ways to increase stability for an already assembled system are to raise the voltage, raise the timings, or lower the clock speed. Because the second two methods reduce performance, most people try raising the voltage first.

Now that you know all this, buy the board (it's a good one), pick a late-version Athlon 64, and if you have any stability or performance issues you know what to adjust.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
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July 4, 2005 12:39:53 AM

WOOTS! WASSUP MOZZ! Got back yesterday. It's been a HELLUVA month! How are things in the Mozz world of extreme OCing?

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