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Universal Access Point

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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
November 4, 2004 4:18:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Is there any such thing as an access point that could be
connected to my router via an Ethernet connection and support *all*
current wireless standards (in other words, it wouldn't matter which
802.11 standard someone has in their laptop they walked in with, it
will accomodate them anyway and be able to get an IP address from the
DHCP host in my SOHO router?

Thanks,


Fred

More about : universal access point

Anonymous
a b F Wireless
November 4, 2004 12:31:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Thu, 04 Nov 2004 01:18:22 GMT, Fred Atkinson
<fatkinson@mishmash.com> wrote:

> Is there any such thing as an access point that could be
>connected to my router via an Ethernet connection and support *all*
>current wireless standards (in other words, it wouldn't matter which
>802.11 standard someone has in their laptop they walked in with, it
>will accomodate them anyway and be able to get an IP address from the
>DHCP host in my SOHO router?

Careful when you say "all" standards as there are some proprietary
protocols that will probably not be supported (Karlnet, frequency
hopping, etc). All the major manufacturers (Dlink, Netgear, Linksys)
have access points that will do both 2.4Ghz and 5.6Ghz, as well as
802.11a, 802.11b, and 802.11g protocols. These can be easily found on
their respective web piles. If these protocols are all you need or
could want, you're done. Make sure it supports WPA.

I've been told that some access points simultaneously support WEP and
WPA encryption, but have never seen one. This may be an issue if
you're supporting a mixed bag of client radios with encryption.
However, if you're not doing encryption because you're dealing with
the GUM (great unwashed masses) just walking in with a random laptop,
supporting both WEP and WPA will not be an issue.

One big problem is that WPA2 (802.11i), when it finally arrives, will
require a hardware upgrade to support AES encryption. Everything you
buy today may soon be obsolete.

Don't forget about PDA's. Some don't have 802.11a/b/g so methinks
Bluetooth or perhaps IrDA connectivity might be nice.


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
November 4, 2004 9:27:56 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

: Is there any such thing as an access point that could be
: connected to my router via an Ethernet connection and support *all*
: current wireless standards (in other words, it wouldn't matter which
: 802.11 standard someone has in their laptop they walked in with, it
: will accomodate them anyway and be able to get an IP address from the
: DHCP host in my SOHO router?

You mean 2.4GHz and 5GHz?
If answer is yes, my answer is also yes. But you need to buy AP
with two radios (or simply: with two pcmcia slots).
One for 2.4GHz and the second for 5GHz.


m.


--
Marcin Lukasik
Milea Wireless Communications, http://milea.pl
phone/fax/mobile: (++48) 13 44 800 70, 13 44 811 48, 509 390 490

,,the only difference between men and boys is the price of their toys''
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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
November 5, 2004 4:30:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Sounds like a plan. I like that acronym (GUM).

Since this is a home network, cost is obviously a factor. But
it is good to know that Access Points are made that do them all.

By 'all', I did mean 802.11a/b/and g. But from what you say,
even that may not be enough. If IrDA or Bluetooth are the standards
for PDA, maybe I should get something that includes them, too. I'd
like someone who visits me to be able use their PDA if they have one.

As I want my access point to be open, I don't plan to encrypt
it. The idea is that if I have someone over with a device they'll be
able to immediately use it.

Any recommendations on a cost effective device would be
appreciated.



Fred Atkinson
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
November 5, 2004 4:30:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Fri, 05 Nov 2004 13:30:00 GMT, Fred Atkinson
<fatkinson@mishmash.com> wrote:

> Sounds like a plan. I like that acronym (GUM).

The most successful technology is the one that owns the most acronyms.

> Since this is a home network, cost is obviously a factor. But
>it is good to know that Access Points are made that do them all.

Careful. By "all" I mean "all of this weeks standards". Standards
change, improve, and require upgrades. The universal access point for
next year may not even resemble todays products.

> By 'all', I did mean 802.11a/b/and g. But from what you say,
>even that may not be enough.

For a home environment, it should be sufficient. I have yet to see a
laptop that support ONLY 802.11a (5.6Ghz). Invariably, they are dual
band units that support 802.11a/b/g. Therefore, methinks you're safe
by literally ignoring 802.11a. That should save a few dollars.

>If IrDA or Bluetooth are the standards
>for PDA, maybe I should get something that includes them, too. I'd
>like someone who visits me to be able use their PDA if they have one.

Similarly, there are no 802.11a radios in PDA's, so that's not an
issue. What I've found in an office environment is that someone with
a PDA wants to print something. Despite all the modern connectivity
technology, it usually results in copying the file to another PC and
printing it from there. Having a universal memory card reader with
whatever goofy standards and form factors are popular with PDA's seems
to be sufficient. No need for wireless.

Bluetooth is nice for connectivity to PDA's. The cost is nominal when
directly connected to a PC via USB. However, I have yet to see a
conglomerated access point that includes the usual 802.11a/b/g as well
as Bluetooth. It's coming as there are SDR (software defined radio)
chips available that can do it all, but not quite yet. If you wanna
do Bluetooth, you'll probably need to do it seperately.
http://catalog.belkin.com/IWCatProductPage.process?Merc...

>As I want my access point to be open, I don't plan to encrypt
>it. The idea is that if I have someone over with a device they'll be
>able to immediately use it.

Dream on. Wireless Zero Config is an improvement but far from
perfect. There will be some screwing around with settings, clicking
"ok" a million times, and dealing with compatibility issues. You'll
find yourself doing tech support for the visitors. Be sure to thank
them for delivering a worm, virus, or trojan into your network when
they arrive with an infected laptop.

> Any recommendations on a cost effective device would be
>appreciated.

You haven't told me the price range, so I don't know what you mean by
"cost effective". Therefore, I degenerate to strategy. You can
ignore 802.11a if you want as most laptops are dual mode and will
support 2.4GHz. IrDA requires way too much fiddling to be useful
(install printer drivers, etc). Memory cards can take care of the
PDA's. Bluetooth access point will be useful. Therefore, you need
3ea boxes:
802.11b/g access point
Bluetooth access point
Memory Card USB adapter.
This week, I kinda like the Linksys WRT54G and WAP54G. No clue on the
Bluetooth access point. I like Sandisk adapters for memory cards
because the drivers seem to work (without hanging the machine if you
yank the card without going through the card removal ordeal process).


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
November 5, 2004 6:43:56 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

: Any recommendations on a cost effective device would be
: appreciated.

I think that an AP with 2.4GHz and 5GHz radios will be the best choice.
IrDA is not so mobile at all and also sloooow, bluetooth - very small range.

m.



--
Marcin Lukasik
Milea Wireless Communications, http://milea.pl
phone/fax/mobile: (++48) 13 44 800 70, 13 44 811 48, 509 390 490

,,the only difference between men and boys is the price of their toys''
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
November 8, 2004 6:12:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Cisco 1200 series access points can do 802.11 A/B/G in one unit. They
have two slots one that is primary for the B/G and the other is a card
and antenna that installs in a slot on the bottom that supports
802.11A. The A has some real limitations in range and IMHO is not well
suited for most enviroments. Commercial buildings tend to use metal
studs etc that prevent coverage from extending very far. The G spec
provides almost as much bandwidth at much greater range.

INHO 802.11A is best suited for point to point links. A link like this
will usually have fixed parabolic antennas with a known path loss and
stable performance.



Fred Atkinson <fatkinson@mishmash.com> wrote in message news:<di0jo0dp09ck3qsj87np6726i87i4bbrn1@4ax.com>...
> Is there any such thing as an access point that could be
> connected to my router via an Ethernet connection and support *all*
> current wireless standards (in other words, it wouldn't matter which
> 802.11 standard someone has in their laptop they walked in with, it
> will accomodate them anyway and be able to get an IP address from the
> DHCP host in my SOHO router?
>
> Thanks,
>
>
> Fred
!