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Can I Install the Upgrade on a Different Computer?

Last response: in Windows 7
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October 7, 2009 9:20:37 PM

I just pre-ordered the student offer Windows 7 upgrade to initiate building my own computer after countless blue screen restarts on my old laptop. Now I've done some reading im not sure if i can even use it.

I have a laptop which came with Windows XP Home and I'm hoping to build myself an i7 desktop after the release of windows 7 (with 64 bit professional).

Can I install the upgrade on my new desktop using the key from the laptop?
October 7, 2009 9:29:29 PM

supposedly you can can use the upgrade win7 product to do an install on a new machine but you may have to install xp (but not activate) or the win7 beta on it first, then do the win7 upgrade cd and tell it do a clean install with a hdd format. MS hasnt really said yet.
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October 7, 2009 9:33:07 PM

Your XP licence becomes invalid after you update to to Windows 7 from that one, but from my own experience, it's still possible to use your old key, as it won't get checked.
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October 7, 2009 9:40:29 PM

The laptop came with a "product recovery cd-rom" which contains Windows XP Home and "can only be used with the computer it came with". I'm worred that means my license wont cover upgrading on another computer?

the cd-rom is from www.mobile-support.net
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a b $ Windows 7
October 9, 2009 1:41:09 PM

J_bob,

The license you have for Windows XP Home is an OEM license and is only valid for that machine -- you would be allowed to upgrade to Windows 7 on your laptop but will need to purchase a full license for your future build.

Also, you will need to perform a clean install when migrating from Windows XP to Windows 7. When migrating from Windows XP to Windows 7 you will have no "in place upgrade" option. You will however have the option to select "custom" install when prompted. The Windows 7 install process will then copy all of your data in "My Documents" over to a Windows.old folder within Windows 7 itself. All applications and documents stored in other locations will have to be reinstalled / transfered manually.

For additional assistance with the migration of Windows XP to Windows 7, Microsoft does have an official Windows 7 Support Forum located here http://tinyurl.com/9fhdl5 . It is supported by product specialists as well as engineers and support teams. You are welcome to check the threads there and receive additional assistance and feedback.

Jessica
Microsoft Windows Client Team

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October 9, 2009 5:50:22 PM

Thanks for the help. it would have been nice if MS had explained the licensing before selling me the software.
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a b D Laptop
a b $ Windows 7
October 9, 2009 6:20:19 PM

You new before purchasing the upgrade that you wanted to use it on a new computer which requires a full licence. How is that the fault of MS.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 9, 2009 6:25:23 PM

j_bob said:
Thanks for the help. it would have been nice if MS had explained the licensing before selling me the software.



Real simple: Once Licence, One Computer.
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October 9, 2009 6:36:05 PM

I thought I could use the upgrade because I already have a version of Windows XP, I didn't know about the different licenses and I'm pretty sure most people don't.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 9, 2009 6:47:04 PM

Look - You are trying to apply an upgrade licence to a new computer. As explained already, it does not work that way - with an Upgrade licence, you may UPGRADE an existing installation.

If you want an OS for a new computer, then you should buy a new licence.

Simple Common Sense.
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a b D Laptop
a b $ Windows 7
October 9, 2009 7:52:55 PM

Scotteq said:
Look - You are trying to apply an upgrade licence to a new computer. As explained already, it does not work that way - with an Upgrade licence, you may UPGRADE an existing installation.

If you want an OS for a new computer, then you should buy a new licence.

Simple Common Sense.


It may be simple common sense if you sell an OS for a living, however there are a significant number of us who are not yet indoctrinated into the idea that you need a new OS every time you build a new box. Myself included. I think maybe some of you aren't old enough to remember it wasn't always this way. I have two legal copies of XP that I continue to install on new boxes every time I build one. I'm sure all you Microsoft fanboys are screaming at your screens right now but I fail to see why my lot in life should be to support Microsoft who continues to make "new" software consisting of largely cosmetic changes. All they want to do is keep their jobs at our expense. BTW, all software companies are the same. Major innovations ended years ago.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 9, 2009 7:57:31 PM

Well... In a professional capacity I'm not directly involved in the industry any more, and haven't been for the better part of a decade. But I did "grow up" in Software, so perhaps that gives me an understanding that some people (choose not to?) have. Contrary to your assertions, my experience has been from the very beginning that the default rule is One Licence Per Box, and when you get another box you need another licence.

And you don't have to 'support Microsoft" - After all, as you ably point out, you have been reinstalling XP time and again.
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a b D Laptop
a b $ Windows 7
October 9, 2009 10:32:53 PM

Scotteq said:
Well... In a professional capacity I'm not directly involved in the industry any more, and haven't been for the better part of a decade. But I did "grow up" in Software, so perhaps that gives me an understanding that some people (choose not to?) have. Contrary to your assertions, my experience has been from the very beginning that the default rule is One Licence Per Box, and when you get another box you need another licence.

And you don't have to 'support Microsoft" - After all, as you ably point out, you have been reinstalling XP time and again.



Yes, I have re-installed XP numerous times and I passed on Vista because it offered nothing new that I needed/wanted. BUT, Microsoft is about to put an end to all that. I believe they learned their lesson from Vista, that being that people (given a choice) won't necessarily buy something just because you say they should, especially at the exorbitant prices they get for their OS. Since Microsoft ( like all software companies) must keep the revenue flowing they will eventually have no choice but to sell much shorter term licenses that disable themselves if you don't pay your bill. I believe software will become a utility payment like phones or water or electricity. I believe it's inevitable to keep money flowing to keep their jobs. BTW, if what you say is true ( one license per box) then why have I been able to re-install XP so many times? I did the same with W98, W95 & plain old "W". So, I don't know what "beginning" you were at.
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October 10, 2009 8:08:17 AM

In about tw0 weeks, we'll all probably know the answer to this question. As of now, all anyone can do is speculate. Based on past behaviour, I'd guess that most of the speculation so far is not too far from the mark.

A possible work-around is to use something like Acronis to image your old drive to a DVD, then use that to either 'trick' WIN 7 into believing that is the real install, or actually do the install on your new machine then do your upgrade. I can see 'gotchas' with this methodology, but worth a try...
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a b D Laptop
a b $ Windows 7
October 10, 2009 2:28:56 PM

croc said:
In about tw0 weeks, we'll all probably know the answer to this question. As of now, all anyone can do is speculate. Based on past behaviour, I'd guess that most of the speculation so far is not too far from the mark.

A possible work-around is to use something like Acronis to image your old drive to a DVD, then use that to either 'trick' WIN 7 into believing that is the real install, or actually do the install on your new machine then do your upgrade. I can see 'gotchas' with this methodology, but worth a try...



Yes, it is speculation how software licensing will evolve, however there are already many software packages which REQUIRE re-purchasing of a license yearly. One that I use is DVDFab Decrypter (there is a free version but it's not nearly as functional). I also use a CAD package called Solidworks which can't open files made with newer versions and forces update of files made with older versions. The net effect of that policy is mandatory renewal if you intend to share files which is the whole idea behind the software. I doubt the changes I'm predicting will happen immediately (as in 2 weeks from now) however I see no choice for Microsoft ( and others) in order to protect their cash flow. Your thoughts on Acronis intrigue me a little. I'm not completely familiar with it's capabilities. I used it to image a WD HDD to another and it worked flawlessly and was free (yea). You say "image your old drive to a DVD". I guess you mean to image the installed OS to a DVD since a complete drive isn't going to fit on a DVD, but I'm not clear on what you're trying to accomplish by doing this.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 12, 2009 1:58:08 PM

ram1009 said:
...I believe software will become a utility payment like phones or water or electricity. I believe it's inevitable to keep money flowing to keep their jobs. BTW, if what you say is true ( one license per box) then why have I been able to re-install XP so many times? I did the same with W98, W95 & plain old "W". So, I don't know what "beginning" you were at.


For the first part, Microsoft aren't going to expend the resources to track down all of the single users (pirating) their software. Too much effort for too little return. They can, do, have, and will go after people doing this on a larger scale for resale purposes. This does mean that home users can operate more or less with impunity.


Understand that a Retail licence entitles you to move the OS from machine to machine, just so long as you only have it installed on one at a time. An OEM licence is supposed to be tied to a single computer. Microsoft's licencing terms have always been this.

It's just that people don't care and (re)install the operating system anyhow. It's not worth MSFT's while to expend the effort to track all of the single users. Not to mention (I'm sure their perspective on the matter is) that if a given user is going to pirate something, then they'd rather you pirated their stuff rather than switch to the free alternatives. In short: They know very well people are doing this. Just that their approach to the problem is a pragmatic one, rather than a dogmatic one.
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October 13, 2009 4:31:01 AM

Scotteq said:
Not to mention (I'm sure their perspective on the matter is) that if a given user is going to pirate something, then they'd rather you pirated their stuff rather than switch to the free alternatives. In short: They know very well people are doing this. Just that their approach to the problem is a pragmatic one, rather than a dogmatic one.


In some cases I have already done this in a sense (not the pirating) what I have found is that free software (Linux) trumps MS's offerings for older hardware. Do not get me wrong for new hardware thats able to push it, Windows is like 10,000 times easier to use and does what I want it to with out hassle. Linux is getting easier every day but it still has miles to go...

Older hardware can still be useful with a light distro and new hardware is more fun with Windows and games :) 


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April 19, 2012 2:13:53 AM

ram1009 said:
Yes, I have re-installed XP numerous times and I passed on Vista because it offered nothing new that I needed/wanted. BUT, Microsoft is about to put an end to all that. I believe they learned their lesson from Vista, that being that people (given a choice) won't necessarily buy something just because you say they should, especially at the exorbitant prices they get for their OS. Since Microsoft ( like all software companies) must keep the revenue flowing they will eventually have no choice but to sell much shorter term licenses that disable themselves if you don't pay your bill. I believe software will become a utility payment like phones or water or electricity. I believe it's inevitable to keep money flowing to keep their jobs. BTW, if what you say is true ( one license per box) then why have I been able to re-install XP so many times? I did the same with W98, W95 & plain old "W". So, I don't know what "beginning" you were at.



If that whole thing follows through and I have to pay monthly to have my O.S. im DONE with windows, because of you.
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April 19, 2012 2:16:57 AM

ram1009:
i blame you if microsoft tries to bill us monthly for their crap. odds are it will be $100 a month. knowing how microsoft is doing the "what you want" sort of programming with their OS's, more like "what MICROSOFT wants" the direction microsoft will now go, thanks to ram1009's "hypothetical" scenario, soon we will be facing the BLUE SCREEN OF YOUR BILL IS PAST DUE.

When this is introduced i fear Microsoft: Coin Operated Windows AKA: Microsoft:COW
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