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Why console 30fps feels smooth compared to on pc?

Last response: in Video Games
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November 26, 2010 3:17:28 PM

I've been watching my brother play games like halo reach , borderlands , red dead redemption on his 360.
and well , all of them running under 30fps , felt really smooth.

Whereas on my pc demanding games like BC2 and gta iv feel jerky at anything below 45fps :/ 
Anybody knows why?
November 26, 2010 6:43:14 PM

Could be system interrupts here and there where the CPU needs to devote some processing time to background processes... who knows?

Have you tried playing the exact same games on Xbox and PC?
November 27, 2010 8:29:39 PM

I've noticed this too, it is strange. But in games like Crysis 20fps is smooth but doesn't feel anywhere as nice as 60fps but it 20fps is still very playable, least in crysis. BFBC 2 needs 60fps plus to feel smooth, idk why.
Maybe in console its a constant 30fps, no slowdown, while on PC the frame rate goes from 10-50 fps and averages out to 30.
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November 27, 2010 8:51:13 PM

Well with crysis that is the motion blur effect helping that out. Don't know about the PC but background tasks could account for it. Wish windows would have a stop switch for all but essential services at times. Especially for a laptop where battery life is a concern but that is another topic.

My advice would be turn down games to 90's style settings for an equivalent experience. 800 x 600 res and medium settings should do it.
November 28, 2010 1:04:57 AM

It's probably due to the PC multitasking where consoles aren't meant for that. You could also have the graphic settings too high for the computer's specs. Toning them down will increase FPS and reduce lag.
November 28, 2010 2:18:14 PM

Actually my rig can handle the games really well , getting 35-55 fps in BC2 high setting , rarely drops below 30fps.
November 28, 2010 9:49:08 PM

the blurry low res up converted image on the xbox makes it less noticeable? maybe
November 29, 2010 3:45:24 AM

I think it is because these games you mentioned are made for the 360 not the pc. therefore these games you are playing are ports so they are not going to work as well. Consoles work way differently than PC games, they don't use RAM
November 29, 2010 4:04:55 AM

Basically, a pc game has to go through the operating system and is micromanaged by windows through your hardware, where multiple programs are running.

However, at any INSTANT in time, a processor core is only processing one set of binary instructions at a time (hyperthreading, packing, everything else aside), so if your operating system allocates a few instants in time to another process, you can actually see a jump in a moving picture on your screen, however small, and your framerate detector not pick it up.

A console doesn't have an operating system, it is basically a machine configured with an ISA(instruction set architecture) to do a few distinct different things, and the games are programmed to that ISA instead of being programmed to an open-source type environment that PC games are written to.

The point of all that is to let you understand that a console game interfaces directly with the hardware of the console, where a pc game (even if written completely in assembly) still has to be micromanaged by your OS, where regardless of how awesome your machine is, can make it jump every once in a while.
November 30, 2010 9:11:02 PM

PC's sometime have a hard time locking the FP/s at 30. Console's don't usually
November 30, 2010 11:41:45 PM

CPUs in PCs are devoted more to other processes in comparison to just playing video games, therefore leaving PC games with less lee-way.
November 30, 2010 11:50:59 PM

Yeah, have as little running in the background as possible. I killed a bunch of startup programs and you can end some other proceses in the task manager to minimize lag. Also, im sure more cores help :) 
December 1, 2010 5:31:46 AM

my phenom II X4 955 oced to 3.8ghz shouldn't have any problems at all , I guess its the consolized games fault :/ 
December 1, 2010 7:47:51 AM

i find the opposite. PS3 games look and run sh*t compared to my PC, and my PC isnt even that great. set your PC to 720p res, like console games, and your PC will seem incredibly smooth also. If your having problems running games smoothly maybe you add more ram. loading is often a cause of stutter in pc games even if the average FPS is high.
December 1, 2010 12:26:46 PM

iam2thecrowe said:
i find the opposite. PS3 games look and run sh*t compared to my PC, and my PC isnt even that great. set your PC to 720p res, like console games, and your PC will seem incredibly smooth also. If your having problems running games smoothly maybe you add more ram. loading is often a cause of stutter in pc games even if the average FPS is high.

I get 60+ fps at 720p so ofcourse its smooth , but you're forgetting my point that console games "feel" smooth at 30fps.
Already have 4gb ddr3 1600mhz dominators.

Can someone close this?
December 2, 2010 6:42:59 AM

Maybe it's because the console is run stable at 30fps, so for human eyes, it's much more easier to eyes.
Different with PC, sometimes the fps run at 60 fps, but sometimes when a background service tackles, the fps drops by, say, 5 fps, and that causes instability graphics for eyes, even just for a split second, it will not seen as smooth as forever-stable 30 fps in the console. So it's like watching the TV in the console. TV NTSC video has 30 fps remember?
March 14, 2011 2:33:51 PM

I have a gamepad for my computer and runs like a console at 30 fps.
Tested with crysis 2.
If i try playing with my gaming mouse i need 60fps+, otherwise it seems like the game is hanging.
I guess you will only see a few frames with a quick movement of a mouse compared to a slower movement of the gamepad.
March 15, 2011 11:27:23 AM

Quote:
Basically, a pc game has to go through the operating system and is micromanaged by windows through your hardware, where multiple programs are running.

However, at any INSTANT in time, a processor core is only processing one set of binary instructions at a time (hyperthreading, packing, everything else aside), so if your operating system allocates a few instants in time to another process, you can actually see a jump in a moving picture on your screen, however small, and your framerate detector not pick it up.

A console doesn't have an operating system, it is basically a machine configured with an ISA(instruction set architecture) to do a few distinct different things, and the games are programmed to that ISA instead of being programmed to an open-source type environment that PC games are written to.

The point of all that is to let you understand that a console game interfaces directly with the hardware of the console, where a pc game (even if written completely in assembly) still has to be micromanaged by your OS, where regardless of how awesome your machine is, can make it jump every once in a while.



Exactly. People need to understand, ISA's don't NEED 2GB of RAM, because they will never need to use that much at any given point in time. People really don't understand how much processing power is wasted because you have to go through an OS...

Likewise, consoles will operate at a near constant 30FPS, where PC's will jump around, and its the jumps in FPS you notice. I'd wager if you did a blind test on a PC, with one game capped at 30FPS, and one that goes between 45-60, the one going the constant 30 would be more appealing to look at.
March 15, 2011 2:57:55 PM

Anything designed to run specific task will always out preform something designed to run multiple task... Think of the thousands of things more that your PC can do.. also you dont have anitvirus, anti malware, ect.. running in the background.
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