Corporate plans and minute pooling?

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Our corporate office tried to move all locations to Nextel to save us a
bunch of money. It would have worked too except for our outside sales
people work in areas where roaming is required and Nextel just didn't have
the coverage. The sales reps were all on Verizon and have since moved back
to using personal accounts and filing expense reports, each of them at about
$300 a pop per month.

On reason Verizon was not considered originally was our local reap, found
via the Verizon website, said he could only handle the people in our local
area code, and people for instance in our Florida office, would have to find
a rep there.

What we've like to do now is start a new account as we have the need for one
new user in my area code and then transfer all these personal Verizon
accounts into what we will call our corporate account, pool their minutes
and try to save some dough.

Does this sound like it will work?

Thanks!
5 answers Last reply
More about corporate plans minute pooling
  1. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    You Know Who wrote:
    > Our corporate office tried to move all locations to Nextel to save us
    > a bunch of money. It would have worked too except for our outside
    > sales people work in areas where roaming is required and Nextel just
    > didn't have the coverage. The sales reps were all on Verizon and have
    > since moved back to using personal accounts and filing expense
    > reports, each of them at about $300 a pop per month.
    >
    > On reason Verizon was not considered originally was our local reap,
    > found via the Verizon website, said he could only handle the people
    > in our local area code, and people for instance in our Florida
    > office, would have to find a rep there.
    >
    > What we've like to do now is start a new account as we have the need
    > for one new user in my area code and then transfer all these personal
    > Verizon accounts into what we will call our corporate account, pool
    > their minutes and try to save some dough.
    >
    > Does this sound like it will work?

    Probably not. You are thinking of a Family Share plan? I think there
    may be a limit (4?) to the number of secondary lines. Multiple family
    share plans might do it (putting some thought and math into who you
    group together for the most effeciency).

    I assume you have a "coporate accounts" rep? How many lines are
    you talking about? You should try to go in through the "business accounts"
    side of VZW if you haven't (it's a more-or-less separate side of the house).

    -Quick
  2. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    "You Know Who" <stop-spam-please_kilbyfan@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:6PE2d.22231$8x7.1567@newssvr29.news.prodigy.com...
    > Our corporate office tried to move all locations to Nextel to save us a
    > bunch of money. It would have worked too except for our outside sales
    > people work in areas where roaming is required and Nextel just didn't have
    > the coverage. The sales reps were all on Verizon and have since moved back
    > to using personal accounts and filing expense reports, each of them at
    about
    > $300 a pop per month.
    >
    > On reason Verizon was not considered originally was our local reap, found
    > via the Verizon website, said he could only handle the people in our local
    > area code, and people for instance in our Florida office, would have to
    find
    > a rep there.
    >
    > What we've like to do now is start a new account as we have the need for
    one
    > new user in my area code and then transfer all these personal Verizon
    > accounts into what we will call our corporate account, pool their minutes
    > and try to save some dough.
    >
    > Does this sound like it will work?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    >

    Talk to Verizon about corporate accounts. And get a REP that doesn't lie. My
    sister works for SSA and they have about 15,000-18,000 corporate phones
    (with a discount on service too!) and I think I can safely say that Social
    Security is in all 50 states.
    That's mainly on a big contract, each person has their own phone (pay their
    own bill, no shared minutes, but a corporate discount for both business and
    personal calls), and you can set it up for autopay
    There are a bunch of plans for other smaller companies (who can control
    which employees have phones) just have a bunch of corporate phones, paid for
    by the company, in network between em)
    Go to www.verizonwireless.com and near the top, in the red line, mouse over
    "Business" and then click on small office/home office or small/medium
    business for plans/ideas etc.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    "Quick" <quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:1095471250.245121@sj-nntpcache-3...
    >
    > Ok... let me guess what he is looking for.
    >
    > He would like all the company cell phones to share peak minutes
    > from a company wide pool (like a super family share plan). The
    > company phone users are not primarily for calling between themselves
    > but to customers, accounts, etc. as well as between themselves on
    > occassion (the In Network minutes would be a bonus). The shared
    > pool is way more cost effective than individual plans for single phones
    > or a bunch of small family share plans.
    >
    > He would like each company phone to have a phone number that
    > is local to that area so that customers can make a local call to their
    > account rep, salesman, etc.
    >
    > He would like a single bill for all the company phones.
    > He would like a single account for all the company phones.
    >
    > how's that?
    >
    > -Quick
    >
    >

    Super shared plan (more than 4 lines) probably won't happen for home use,
    but something very similar is certainly feasible for business use (depends
    on how many phones, and what your one rep can do, business accounts allow a
    bunch of phones to be shared on one business account with multiple area
    codes and company discounts... they love business users, remember they built
    the network for business users, and just let home users use it free after
    9PM since they have the capacity during the day).
    Understand, even personally you can have a share plan and all the numbers
    don't have to be local. For a non business example, a mom and dad have two
    kids on a shareplan, but the two kids are in college in different areas and
    different area codes..From personal experience, you can't order things (like
    pizza) with an out of state callback number (I almost starved my first
    semester!), and the kids friends at college would have to call long distance
    (to the parents area code) to reach them even if they are in the dorm room
    next door if they couldn't have out of area numbers. So the kids have out of
    area phone numbers even though the mom and dad still have one in area. On
    one of my phones, I have an Idaho based contract but with a Baltimore MD
    phone number (so my friends there can call me by calling a local number,
    even though I am 2400+ miles away).
    I'm gonna make a wild guess on the number of phones, based on how we set
    stuff up for one of our customers (I still have no clue how many phones you
    want, so I'll have to go with the 250 we did for a customer). A company we
    do business with, has a plant (and the main business office) in Spokane, and
    has three sales/subsidiaries in other areas. The Main account was set up
    like a "super" shared plan with 250 phones. The main bill for all 250 phones
    is sent to corporate headquarters for payment every month, and they get a
    corporate discount of 12%. 100 of the phones have local Spokane numbers, and
    each of the 3 divisions have 50 phones, each with local numbers for that
    area code. They can call each other airtime free (they all have free
    in-network). There is one humongous bucket of minutes for all 250 phones,
    and a super low rate for any overages. Main difference is with the regular
    family share plan you pay about $20 for each extra line in groups of three
    with one master contract. For the business group, each line gets charged the
    full amount (rather than the shared amount, they get a corporate discount
    though, and there are more savings when you get plans that have say 100,000
    or 200,000 etc minutes.. gets real cheap per minute), but are billed as one
    contract no matter how many phones are in the business group (let me say
    that while the upper limit should be unlimited, I have never seen or heard
    of a group with more than 20,000 phones/10 million minutes a month.. Wish I
    had a commission on that!).
  4. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    My company uses the "America's Choice Business Share" plan. In my
    office, I recently converted all of our 50 or so cell phones to this
    plan. Formerly, the phones were on a real mix of old legacy plans.
    Some were still analog plans.

    The plan I used gave us 400 pooled minutes for each phone. So, the 50
    phones ae sharing a pool of (400x50) 20000 minutes. More than enough
    for all of our needs.

    Overall, the bottom line was a great improvement for my office, while
    ending up with a hugh pool of shared minutes. This means, no more
    overage charges for us!

    You need to contact a corporate rep to do this. BUT, IT CAN BE DONE!!

    Don

    "You Know Who" <stop-spam-please_kilbyfan@aol.com> wrote in message news:<6PE2d.22231$8x7.1567@newssvr29.news.prodigy.com>...
    > Our corporate office tried to move all locations to Nextel to save us a
    > bunch of money. It would have worked too except for our outside sales
    > people work in areas where roaming is required and Nextel just didn't have
    > the coverage. The sales reps were all on Verizon and have since moved back
    > to using personal accounts and filing expense reports, each of them at about
    > $300 a pop per month.
    >
    > On reason Verizon was not considered originally was our local reap, found
    > via the Verizon website, said he could only handle the people in our local
    > area code, and people for instance in our Florida office, would have to find
    > a rep there.
    >
    > What we've like to do now is start a new account as we have the need for one
    > new user in my area code and then transfer all these personal Verizon
    > accounts into what we will call our corporate account, pool their minutes
    > and try to save some dough.
    >
    > Does this sound like it will work?
    >
    > Thanks!
  5. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    So here is the deal:

    If you are a business and have five or more lines of service (in one area)
    you should contact a business representative and get a corporate account
    setup. This is what I did for our company and it has benefited us in
    several ways. You get discounts on equipment, you get discounts on service
    (although they start at a measly 6% a month), you get a single point of
    contact (at least for lines of service in a given area), you get access to
    the corporate support reps that answer the call on the first ring with no
    menus, you get one bill, and most importantly- you can get "Business Share"
    lines of service.

    Business Share lines of service basically allow you to pay $5 more a month
    per line of service but then all your minutes are pooled with your other
    Business Share lines of service (and all overage is billed at 25 cents per
    minute).

    The down side is that for small businesses the rep's are only allowed to
    sell lines of service in their local area. You have to talk to a different
    rep for *EVERY* different local area. Now the other thing to note is what
    billing system different areas are in. You can only share minutes on
    business share plans within a given billing system. So while most of my
    lines of service are from my Portland business rep I can still share minutes
    with my lines of service in California and Utah since they are in the same
    billing system...

    If you have more than 100 lines of service you can get a national account
    and theoretically they can roll up everything into one bill and you get a
    single point of contact for lines of service anywhere...

    I am a whole hearted fan of Verizon as far as their coverage and network
    quality goes, however, they have a LOT of room for improvement in their
    small business offering...

    -Eric

    "You Know Who" <stop-spam-please_kilbyfan@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:6PE2d.22231$8x7.1567@newssvr29.news.prodigy.com...
    > Our corporate office tried to move all locations to Nextel to save us a
    > bunch of money. It would have worked too except for our outside sales
    > people work in areas where roaming is required and Nextel just didn't have
    > the coverage. The sales reps were all on Verizon and have since moved back
    > to using personal accounts and filing expense reports, each of them at
    > about
    > $300 a pop per month.
    >
    > On reason Verizon was not considered originally was our local reap, found
    > via the Verizon website, said he could only handle the people in our local
    > area code, and people for instance in our Florida office, would have to
    > find
    > a rep there.
    >
    > What we've like to do now is start a new account as we have the need for
    > one
    > new user in my area code and then transfer all these personal Verizon
    > accounts into what we will call our corporate account, pool their minutes
    > and try to save some dough.
    >
    > Does this sound like it will work?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    >
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