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format 160gb win98se?

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January 23, 2005 1:06:48 AM

I have a 160 gb hd currently formatted to NTFS, which was the only way I *could* format it when I first got it.

I mostly use windows 98se, and I have exhausted all methods I could come up with to format this larger hd to fat32.

The largest hd I can format to fat32 for win98se is 120gb - FDISK refuses to create a fat32 partition greater than 120gb!

Does anyone know any way at all I can re-format this 160 gb hd (now empty) to fat32 so I can use it on my win98se system?

Thanks for anyone who has an answer. Littleberry

More about : format 160gb win98se

January 25, 2005 1:01:23 AM

Make two partitions of 80 GB each and format each one. Youll end up with two new drive letters in windows but youll have all 160 gb of space.
January 26, 2005 3:04:17 AM

Do you use FDISK from the windows 98SE startup disK? Or is there a 3rd party app that you have to use? I want to do that so I can use this h/d with win98se. Thanks. Littleberry
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January 26, 2005 12:45:54 PM

if you dont have the os installed yet, use fdisk to make the partitions and format them, then install windows 98. if you already have windows installed you should be able to format the rest from within windows i think. Been a long time since ive used 98. I know in xp you can make partitions from within the os.
February 8, 2005 12:39:42 PM

I got a new MOTHERBOARD with a modern BIOS and was able to format the entire 160GB as FAT32. The limitation I had been experiencing is in the BIOS and NOT the software. You can use the standard FDISK that you get when you create a startup floppy diskette from Windows 98SE, and select MAXIMUM SIZE AVAILABLE. It will indicate the wrong size number ( about 20 gb), but, if you let it finish and then use the standard FORMAT command from the same floppy (after you reboot - you have to reboot from the floppy), then the format also reports the wrong size during the format, but will report the correct size (160GB) after it finishes (about 1 hour). You can access it under windows98SE as 160GB, and also on older MOTHERBOARDS using the USB-IDE connectors, and still use the full 160GB.
This is good news - it means you can still use your older motherboards and take advantage of the newer larger H/D's (over 128gb) and be able to use them on windows 98SE, provided you have a newer motherboard PC to format them in the first place. FAT32 is better than NTFS (in my opinion) because WINDOWS 98SE is still preferred for many features over windows 2000 or winows XP. littleberry
February 8, 2005 2:52:55 PM

Quote:
FAT32 is better than NTFS (in my opinion) because WINDOWS 98SE is still preferred for many features over windows 2000 or winows XP.


There is no way you'll ever convince me of that. None.

NTFS is far superior to FAT32.

<font color=red> If you design software that is fool-proof, only a fool will want to use it. </font color=red>
February 8, 2005 10:06:17 PM

It's easier to recover files from a FAT32 drive when your windows installation gets FUBAR. Just pop in a boot disk and copy the entire folder and all its contents to another drive in DOS mode.

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<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
February 9, 2005 2:29:34 PM

I DO like NTFS better because of the 4 gb file size limit under FAT32, BUT, the reason I want all my h/d's to be FAT32 is because I still use WIN98SE for some apps that run badly (or not at all) on win2000 or winxp. Win98se is what I usually boot up with, but, I have dual boot on most PC's so I can boot to win2000 or xp if needed. So, I have to keep on using fat32 as long as win98se is still an important OS. Also, like crashman saya, DOS can see these fat32 drives, and, I still have some DOS things I occassionally do. But, yes, if I ever fianlly quit win98se for good, then I will go with ntfs all the way. Littleberry
February 10, 2005 5:29:05 PM

True, but your windows installation is much less likely to get FUBARed with NTFS.

:tongue:

The only time I managed to hose my XP install was when I used Diskkeeper to do an offline defrag shortly after SP1 was released. I switched to PerfectDisk and my problem was solved.

<font color=red> If you design software that is fool-proof, only a fool will want to use it. </font color=red>
February 10, 2005 7:33:22 PM

I don't know about that, it's happened to me.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
February 12, 2005 6:38:41 PM

I don't know that it is less likely to screw up. It just has vastly better security options and management of space :) 
You can fit a whole lot more on an HD if you use NTFS rather than FAT32

<A HREF="http://www.folken.net/myrig.htm" target="_new">My precious...</A>
February 13, 2005 11:43:41 PM

A couple of recent events apply here. One, I was recording a long internet radio show and forgot to stop and wound up with a file size of 3.6 gb before I caught it. Bad news. Even in fat32 (which is supposed so allow 4 gb), it was too big and won't play, copy, move, or be processed at all. That would not have happened if I had been using NTFS.
BUT, two,I found out on the Drivers forum that you can get a USB2 driver for DOS, which makes it even more nice to use FAT32 since you can fdisk and format a new larger H/D to FAT32 that way without having to connect it to the IDE cables at all. As much as NTFS is better for larger file sizes, it seems the flexibility of FAT32, including the DOS initialization and accessability, convinces me to stay with FAT32 for the time being. I really don't have any need for large file sizes (over 2gb), so, I remaind tied to FAT32. littleberry
February 14, 2005 2:50:35 PM

You were using a VIA chipset board at the time, right?

:smile:

<font color=red> If you design software that is fool-proof, only a fool will want to use it. </font color=red>
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