Will a WAP work?

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Hello. My wired network consists of a Speedstream 5660 dsl modem in
bridged mode attached to a 4 port switch. Three computers are
connected to the switch. If only one computer is connected to the
internet, ppoe is used. Multiple computer internet access is through
ICS. Is it possible to connect a wap to the remaining switch port and
access the internet through a laptop? I am trying to avoid using a
router because of past negative experiences. The last wired router I
hooked up worked fine unless one was accessing a secure site. Then
the connection timed out or was 10 times slower than normal. Thanks
in advance for any assistance. Chuck
4 answers Last reply
More about will work
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Chuck <ch@deja.net> wrote in news:4sqmp0pt03kug054694rvgsocoucmdnggv@
    4ax.com:

    > Hello. My wired network consists of a Speedstream 5660 dsl modem in
    > bridged mode attached to a 4 port switch. Three computers are
    > connected to the switch. If only one computer is connected to the
    > internet, ppoe is used. Multiple computer internet access is through
    > ICS. Is it possible to connect a wap to the remaining switch port and
    > access the internet through a laptop? I am trying to avoid using a
    > router because of past negative experiences.

    Chuck, the last time I refused to do something due to a 'past experience'
    it was to set up ICS at a friend's house. I refused to do it and forced him
    to buy a cheapy router. Said and done.


    The last wired router I
    > hooked up worked fine unless one was accessing a secure site. Then
    > the connection timed out or was 10 times slower than normal. Thanks
    > in advance for any assistance. Chuck
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Wed, 17 Nov 2004 15:38:41 GMT, Chuck <ch@deja.net> wrote:

    >Hello. My wired network consists of a Speedstream 5660 dsl modem in
    >bridged mode attached to a 4 port switch. Three computers are
    >connected to the switch. If only one computer is connected to the
    >internet, ppoe is used. Multiple computer internet access is through
    >ICS. Is it possible to connect a wap to the remaining switch port and
    >access the internet through a laptop?

    Yes. A wireless access point is a bridge that encapsulates ethernet
    802.3 packets. Anything you can do by plugging in an ethernet cable
    directly into your switch, can be done with wireless. The catch is
    that almost all client radios will only bridge one MAC address. No
    problem for your laptop, or multiple laptops, each with their own
    client radios. However, don't try to plug a switch into the client
    radio, and expect it to bridge more than one MAC address. That
    doesn't work with an ordinary access point and generic client radios.

    >I am trying to avoid using a
    >router because of past negative experiences. The last wired router I
    >hooked up worked fine unless one was accessing a secure site. Then
    >the connection timed out or was 10 times slower than normal.

    Well, you either got a lemon or you did something wrong. Most of the
    users in this newsgroup have hardware routers, and use them without
    incident or difficulties. It's the prefered solution as ICS and some
    proxy server software solutions are, well...ugly. May I humbly
    suggest you try again with a hardware router.


    --
    # Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
    # 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    # jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    # 831.421.6491 digital_pager jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Wed, 17 Nov 2004 23:44:54 GMT, Jeff Liebermann
    <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:

    >On Wed, 17 Nov 2004 15:38:41 GMT, Chuck <ch@deja.net> wrote:
    >
    >>Hello. My wired network consists of a Speedstream 5660 dsl modem in
    >>bridged mode attached to a 4 port switch. Three computers are
    >>connected to the switch. If only one computer is connected to the
    >>internet, ppoe is used. Multiple computer internet access is through
    >>ICS. Is it possible to connect a wap to the remaining switch port and
    >>access the internet through a laptop?
    >
    >Yes. A wireless access point is a bridge that encapsulates ethernet
    >802.3 packets. Anything you can do by plugging in an ethernet cable
    >directly into your switch, can be done with wireless. The catch is
    >that almost all client radios will only bridge one MAC address. No
    >problem for your laptop, or multiple laptops, each with their own
    >client radios. However, don't try to plug a switch into the client
    >radio, and expect it to bridge more than one MAC address. That
    >doesn't work with an ordinary access point and generic client radios.
    >
    >>I am trying to avoid using a
    >>router because of past negative experiences. The last wired router I
    >>hooked up worked fine unless one was accessing a secure site. Then
    >>the connection timed out or was 10 times slower than normal.
    >
    >Well, you either got a lemon or you did something wrong. Most of the
    >users in this newsgroup have hardware routers, and use them without
    >incident or difficulties. It's the prefered solution as ICS and some
    >proxy server software solutions are, well...ugly. May I humbly
    >suggest you try again with a hardware router.

    Thanks Jeff. Your advice was spot on. Everything works perfectly.
    The information I got from my local computer emporium was the opposite
    of what you said ; it's a shame they don't hire people with your kind
    of expertise. Chuck
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Thu, 25 Nov 2004 17:27:02 GMT, Chuck <chuck3565@mydeja.com> wrote:

    >On Wed, 17 Nov 2004 23:44:54 GMT, Jeff Liebermann
    ><jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
    >
    >>On Wed, 17 Nov 2004 15:38:41 GMT, Chuck <ch@deja.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Hello. My wired network consists of a Speedstream 5660 dsl modem in
    >>>bridged mode attached to a 4 port switch. Three computers are
    >>>connected to the switch. If only one computer is connected to the
    >>>internet, ppoe is used. Multiple computer internet access is through
    >>>ICS. Is it possible to connect a wap to the remaining switch port and
    >>>access the internet through a laptop?
    >>
    >>Yes. A wireless access point is a bridge that encapsulates ethernet
    >>802.3 packets. Anything you can do by plugging in an ethernet cable
    >>directly into your switch, can be done with wireless. The catch is
    >>that almost all client radios will only bridge one MAC address. No
    >>problem for your laptop, or multiple laptops, each with their own
    >>client radios. However, don't try to plug a switch into the client
    >>radio, and expect it to bridge more than one MAC address. That
    >>doesn't work with an ordinary access point and generic client radios.
    >>
    >>>I am trying to avoid using a
    >>>router because of past negative experiences. The last wired router I
    >>>hooked up worked fine unless one was accessing a secure site. Then
    >>>the connection timed out or was 10 times slower than normal.
    >>
    >>Well, you either got a lemon or you did something wrong. Most of the
    >>users in this newsgroup have hardware routers, and use them without
    >>incident or difficulties. It's the prefered solution as ICS and some
    >>proxy server software solutions are, well...ugly. May I humbly
    >>suggest you try again with a hardware router.

    >Thanks Jeff. Your advice was spot on. Everything works perfectly.
    >The information I got from my local computer emporium was the opposite
    >of what you said ; it's a shame they don't hire people with your kind
    >of expertise. Chuck

    Thanks. Time for rant. One of the problems with the current state of
    license free wireless is that few of the manufacturers seem to find
    any value in explaining how things actually work. The color glossy
    advertising literature has less and less information. The web sites
    are seriously devoid of technical detail. Access to internal wireless
    settings and tweaks is decreasing. Hardware is becoming "self
    configuring". Life is allegedly simpler.

    This is not necessarily a bad thing as most of the buying public will
    successfully plug and play without difficulties or incident. As long
    as the boxes are cheap enough, the success rate is high, and the
    products keep selling, there will be little incentive to supply
    technical details and controls.

    What gets lost in the shuffle is how the various protocols work. The
    docs are there for your reading. A few hundred applicable RFC's for
    the wired part of the LAN and IP services. 600 pages of 802.11
    documentation from the IEEE.
    http://www.ieee.org/portal/index.jsp?pageID=corp_level1&path=about/802std&file=index.xml&xsl=generic.xsl
    Some of it is hard to get and expensive such as ISO docs some IEEE
    docs. My guess is that it would take someone about 5 years of
    constant experience to be able to understand wireless and the
    underlying protocols. Add another few years for understanding RF
    (microwave, propogation, radiation, antennas, etc). Your average
    salesman isn't going to come close.

    There's another reason that pre-sales and support are so dismally
    informed. They tend to have little hands on experience, or as like to
    call it "getting dirty" with the hardware. There's really no way to
    for someone that sits in a phone support dungeon to obtain the
    necessary experience. For example, how will such a person be able to
    give advice on how well 2.4GHz propogates through walls, forests, and
    urban canyons? They cannot without having hands on experience.

    I have more experience than typical, but still am unable to answer all
    the weird things that can happen with wireless and RF. Some of it
    borders on magic. I'm always amazed at what people do with 802.11 as
    conventional theory suggests that it should not work. Even the
    experts are baffled, sometimes.

    Anyway, do some online reading and tinker with the hardware. But
    don't be suprised if you soon know more about the products than
    support or sales.


    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
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