Router as an Access Point

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I've been struggling to get my basement Linux machine to get along with an
802.11g PCI card. Since a wired card is more stable, I'm thinking of
installing one and connecting to either a wireless bridge adapter or a
wireless router. I've read that some routers will behave like bridges/APs
if DHCP is disabled and they're given a static IP.

I'm considering the DI-524, but D-Link "STRONGLY" recommends not doing
this. Has anyone had any problems with this type of setup? I know it's a
convoluted fix, but the router is much cheaper and seems to have greater
potential use in the future if the project falls through. Any help's
appreciated, thanks!
4 answers Last reply
More about router access point
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Fri, 19 Nov 2004 01:15:58 GMT, MG <MG@nospam.com> wrote:

    >I've been struggling to get my basement Linux machine to get along with an
    >802.11g PCI card.

    Make and model? Or have you given up?
    If you had made it work, you would have ended up with a client radio,
    not an access point. What are you trying to build?

    >Since a wired card is more stable,

    Stable? Will it explode if it becomes unstable?

    >I'm thinking of
    >installing one and connecting to either a wireless bridge adapter or a
    >wireless router. I've read that some routers will behave like bridges/APs
    >if DHCP is disabled and they're given a static IP.

    Close. Lots of options depending upon what you want to accomplish
    (which you didn't specify).

    1. USB client radio. Some have Linux drivers.
    2. ethernet to wireless client. No drivers required on the Linux
    side. This will let you talk to an access point or wireless router.
    None of the wireless routers have a client mode. However, many of the
    access points do have a client mode. See WAP54G, DWL900AP+, etc.
    3. Access point running as an access point. WAP54G, DWL900AP+, etc.
    No software required on the Linux box. To talk to your Linux
    server(?), you'll need another computah with a client radio attached.
    4. Router acting as an access point. WRT54G etc. Disable DHCP,
    ignore the WAN port completely, and make sure you don't duplicate the
    IP address on the LAN side. I don't know what you mean by static IP
    as the LAN side IP address of a router is always a static IP address.

    >I'm considering the DI-524,

    Cheap with big rebate this week. No experience with this particular
    model.

    >but D-Link "STRONGLY" recommends not doing
    >this.

    You mean they don't recommend using a wireless router as an access
    point? Well, such recommendations are common enough by other vendors:
    http://kbserver.netgear.com/kb_web_files/n101236.asp

    >Has anyone had any problems with this type of setup?

    Yes. Buggy firmware caused some entertainment on several routers used
    as access points. I forgot the exact model numbers. When I enabled
    MAC address filtering, the wireless part of the puzzle would not pass
    broadcasts. Therefore, the wireless clients did not get a DHCP
    address. When gave them static IP address, Windoze browsing would not
    work. Turn off the MAC address filter and things worked as expected.

    There were also some weird issues with gateway IP address of VPN
    tunnels that are explained in the above Netgear URL.

    >I know it's a convoluted fix, but the router is much cheaper and seems
    >to have greater
    >potential use in the future if the project falls through. Any help's
    >appreciated, thanks!

    It will work. However, it would be nice to know what you are trying
    to accomplish. I can't tell if you're attaching a client radio to the
    Linux box, or want to attach an access point.


    --
    # Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
    # 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    # jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    # 831.421.6491 digital_pager jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    This may be what your looking for, check it out.
    http://dslwebserver.com/main/wireless-router-as-access-point.html


    --
    qball15j
    http://forums.speedguide.net
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in
    news:7opqp0987mqdqcjf1apajrl4i99gt718sm@4ax.com:

    > On Fri, 19 Nov 2004 01:15:58 GMT, MG <MG@nospam.com> wrote:
    >
    >>I've been struggling to get my basement Linux machine to get along
    >>with an 802.11g PCI card.
    >
    > Make and model? Or have you given up?
    > If you had made it work, you would have ended up with a client radio,
    > not an access point. What are you trying to build?
    >

    D-Link, DWL-G510. I'm building a MythTV PVR. I have it working with
    ndiswrapper and the XP drivers but I get a lot of these:

    "wlan0 (WE) : Wireless Event too big (373)"

    They seem to be mostly harmless, but I've also experienced occasional
    system hang ups across Fedora 2, KnoppMyth, and (now) Mandrake 10.1.
    Granted, the wireless card may not be the cause, but it feels like the
    weakest link. Any experience with this?

    >>Since a wired card is more stable,
    >
    > Stable? Will it explode if it becomes unstable?
    >

    Probably not.

    > Close. Lots of options depending upon what you want to accomplish
    > (which you didn't specify).
    >
    > 1. USB client radio. Some have Linux drivers.
    > 2. ethernet to wireless client. No drivers required on the Linux
    > side. This will let you talk to an access point or wireless router.
    > None of the wireless routers have a client mode. However, many of the
    > access points do have a client mode. See WAP54G, DWL900AP+, etc.
    > 3. Access point running as an access point. WAP54G, DWL900AP+, etc.
    > No software required on the Linux box. To talk to your Linux
    > server(?), you'll need another computah with a client radio attached.
    > 4. Router acting as an access point. WRT54G etc. Disable DHCP,
    > ignore the WAN port completely, and make sure you don't duplicate the
    > IP address on the LAN side. I don't know what you mean by static IP
    > as the LAN side IP address of a router is always a static IP address.
    >

    #2, I'm trying to get by without using ndiswrapper. If I can't sort out
    the Linux problem I guess I'll look into access points, or maybe just go
    with SageTV. Newegg seems to have a decent deal on the DWL-G700AP with
    rebate. "static IP"...my mistake, "static IP on the same subnet that
    doesn't conflict with the primary router's IP".

    >
    >>Has anyone had any problems with this type of setup?
    >
    > Yes. Buggy firmware caused some entertainment on several routers used
    > as access points. I forgot the exact model numbers. When I enabled
    > MAC address filtering, the wireless part of the puzzle would not pass
    > broadcasts. Therefore, the wireless clients did not get a DHCP
    > address. When gave them static IP address, Windoze browsing would not
    > work. Turn off the MAC address filter and things worked as expected.
    >
    > There were also some weird issues with gateway IP address of VPN
    > tunnels that are explained in the above Netgear URL.
    >

    Sounds ugly. Thanks for the input.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Fri, 19 Nov 2004 13:13:24 GMT, MG <MG@nospam.com> wrote:

    >Client radio. (Sorry about the confusion.) It's just another box on the
    >network that needs to be able to talk to the wireless router. It doesn't
    >need to do anything fancy, just have Internet access to download TV
    >programming schedules.

    Ok, it's a wireless client, not an access point. My brain keeps
    thinking that all Linux boxes are servers as most of those that I deal
    with are.

    >The easy solution would be a wireless "bridge" that people use to connect
    >their wired Xboxes/PS2s to their wireless networks, like the DWL-G810
    >(http://d-link.com/products/?sec=1&pid=241). My question -- can I get away
    >with a cheaper option that's just as reliable, like an access point (DWL-
    >G700AP) or a wireless router (DI-524)?

    NO, as in absolutely no way in hell. There's a big difference between
    a wireless client radio (actually a bridge) and an access point. Put
    simply, an access point cannot talk to another access point. They are
    not setup to initiate a connection or act as a transparent bridge.
    You will need a box or card specifically designed to act as a client.

    I suggest an external ethernet connected (not USB) radio because it
    involves NO drivers on the Linux end. Some of the access points have
    a client mode, such as the DWL-900AP+ and WAP54G. I'm not thrilled
    with the DWL-2100 and suggest you avoid it. A "game adapter" will
    also work as it was made for exactly the purpose you suggest.

    >(BTW, my router's a DI-524, hence the constant D-Link references.)

    No problem. However another DI-524 will not help as it has no
    wireless client mode.


    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
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