Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Using the windows command line

Last response: in Windows 7
Share
September 21, 2010 9:40:07 AM

I write as one familiar with a few DOS commands and would want to use command line instructions. I have not found good material on learning the basics such as the meaning of brackets [ ], etc

I have not found a source to learn the 'gramar' required to use the command line and seeking guidance. I have only seen glossary lists of commands. Need a place to get started. Guidance sought

More about : windows command line

September 21, 2010 12:02:57 PM

the best help I can give is that the commands are actually programs you are running and normally in order to execute the command you add the command to the program name, but in order to find out what commands you can give you must ask the program itself e.g. "cmd /?" most DOS based programs will work with either "/?" or "-?" after the program name and will normally tell you how to execute them. I grew up using Basic and DOS in the days well before windows 3.0 and dosshell existed and there are very few commands that are not programs, eg. 'dir' (show contents of folder or directory) 'c:' 'd:' etc. (change drive path) 'cd\"directory name" '(change directory/folder path) 'cd..' (go back a directory or folder in the tree) 'md (directory name)' (make directory) I think you might be able to find what you need in your own windows folder C:\WINDOWS\Help\ntcmds.chm
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
September 21, 2010 5:52:54 PM

From a command prompt type help and press enter. A list will appear. choose which one you want to know more about and then type help ......(the.... are the name of the help you want to know more about. For example help xcopy Leave a space between help and .... If you type cls it will clear your screen of all info
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 209 $ Windows 7
September 21, 2010 6:07:37 PM

Brackets indicate portions of a command that are optional. For example:

dir [filename]

means that you can use a filename with the "dir" command if you want to, but it's not required.

If you are considering writing batch files then I'd strongly encourage you to look into PowerShell. It's a basic feature that's included in Windows 7 and it's much more capable than batch files in a Command Prompt window.
m
0
l
!