Ever heard of *677

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

I just received a mail message a "sad story" that someone using verizon
wireless contacted emergency help by pressing *677. Encouraging people to
pass-it-on. Has anyone ever heard of this? Or the story? If true, I'd
like to help pass it on; if not, then I'd like to nip it in the bud, because
someone needing help might actually believe it.

Looking for your help to tell me if *677 is a valid calling code, and if not
verizon, any other carrier as well.

--
dr. wireMORE (don't accept "less", demand "more")
Wireless Consultant/Engineer & Midwest VZW Master Agent
Data, wi-fi, national access, smartphones, and home
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19 answers Last reply
More about ever heard
  1. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 04:40:59 GMT, "dr.wireMORE"
    <dr.wireMORE@VZW-MidWESTma.com> wrote:

    >I just received a mail message a "sad story" that someone using verizon
    >wireless contacted emergency help by pressing *677. Encouraging people to
    >pass-it-on. Has anyone ever heard of this? Or the story? If true, I'd
    >like to help pass it on; if not, then I'd like to nip it in the bud, because
    >someone needing help might actually believe it.
    >
    >Looking for your help to tell me if *677 is a valid calling code, and if not
    >verizon, any other carrier as well.

    If you're in an emergency why would you not use anything else other
    than 911? That's what it's there for!

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
  2. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    "dr.wireMORE" <dr.wireMORE@VZW-MidWESTma.com> wrote in message
    news:vJmcd.8683$5b1.7162@newssvr17.news.prodigy.com...
    >I just received a mail message a "sad story" that someone using
    >verizon
    > wireless contacted emergency help by pressing *677. Encouraging
    > people to
    > pass-it-on. Has anyone ever heard of this? Or the story? If true,
    > I'd
    > like to help pass it on; if not, then I'd like to nip it in the bud,
    > because
    > someone needing help might actually believe it.
    >
    > Looking for your help to tell me if *677 is a valid calling code,
    > and if not
    > verizon, any other carrier as well.
    >
    > --
    > dr. wireMORE (don't accept "less", demand "more")
    > Wireless Consultant/Engineer & Midwest VZW Master Agent
    > Data, wi-fi, national access, smartphones, and home
    > computer healthchecks, stop worrying... just ask for the dr.
    >
    > If you need specific help, leave your email address & we'll try to
    > contact
    > you.
    >
    >


    It may well be, however it may depend on the state your in (MA) has
    such a provision for assistance on their highways and I believe Maine
    has another number for cellular callers etc. I do however think that
    the 911 is a national number in the USA. I noticed that in Parts of
    Canada I travel in the 411 which is Directory assistance here was used
    for the emergency services. (it may have changed by now)

    Elector
  3. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 12:46:36 GMT, "Elector" <elector@my-deja.com>
    wrote:

    >I noticed that in Parts of
    >Canada I travel in the 411 which is Directory assistance here was used
    >for the emergency services. (it may have changed by now)

    Balderdash! 411 has *never* been used for emergency services anywhere
    in North America. 911 has been the emergency number for over thirty
    years. If 911 wasn't available people were always instructed to dial
    '0' for operator. 311 is *starting* to be used in many areas for
    non-emergency police. Hardly universal though.

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
  4. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    <snip>

    > If you're in an emergency why would you not use anything else other
    > than 911? That's what it's there for!

    We have problems here (Alabama) with 911 from a cell phone going to the
    wrong city / county to help, time is lost while the call is transfered. *HP
    gets the State police which maybe or not a better choice. I live in Wiston
    county home of the first E911 system but not sure we have invested to keep
    up, in a perfect world a gps enabled cell phone would send a cell phone 911
    call to the correct center.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Stanley Reynolds <trash_stanley_reynolds@yahoo.com> wrote in
    news:Xns9585846E928E8trashstanleyreynold@216.196.97.142:

    Looks like other states hve problems too.

    http://www.detnews.com/2003/metro/0312/14/a01-6308.htm

    http://www.technologyreview.com/blog/blog.asp?blogID=1402
  6. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Joseph <JoeOfSeattle@yahoo.com> wrote in
    news:3v25n0tii0h8o1p2cnpfnebn8uejs62clf@4ax.com:

    > 911 has been the emergency number for over thirty years. If 911 wasn't
    available people were always instructed to dial '0' for operator.

    *677 is also used in Ontario for emergency calls.
    http://www.police.smiths-falls.on.ca/phone_listings.htm


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  7. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    orwell wrote:

    >>911 has been the emergency number for over thirty years. If 911 wasn't
    >
    > available people were always instructed to dial '0' for operator.
    >
    > *677 is also used in Ontario for emergency calls.
    > http://www.police.smiths-falls.on.ca/phone_listings.htm

    *677 = *ONP

    This is like the specific star codes many states have set up for the state
    police departments.


    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, http://JustThe.net/
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) / sjsobol@JustThe.net
    PGP Key available from your friendly local key server (0xE3AE35ED)
    Apple Valley, California Nothing scares me anymore. I have three kids.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Steve Sobol wrote:

    > *677 = *ONP

    Uh, that's wrong. *677 corresponds to *OPP. Ontario Provincial Police.

    Sorry :)

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, http://JustThe.net/
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) / sjsobol@JustThe.net
    PGP Key available from your friendly local key server (0xE3AE35ED)
    Apple Valley, California Nothing scares me anymore. I have three kids.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    in Massachusetts *677 is for MA State Police


    "dr.wireMORE" <dr.wireMORE@VZW-MidWESTma.com> wrote in message
    news:vJmcd.8683$5b1.7162@newssvr17.news.prodigy.com...
    >I just received a mail message a "sad story" that someone using verizon
    > wireless contacted emergency help by pressing *677. Encouraging people to
    > pass-it-on. Has anyone ever heard of this? Or the story? If true, I'd
    > like to help pass it on; if not, then I'd like to nip it in the bud,
    > because
    > someone needing help might actually believe it.
    >
    > Looking for your help to tell me if *677 is a valid calling code, and if
    > not
    > verizon, any other carrier as well.
    >
    > --
    > dr. wireMORE (don't accept "less", demand "more")
    > Wireless Consultant/Engineer & Midwest VZW Master Agent
    > Data, wi-fi, national access, smartphones, and home
    > computer healthchecks, stop worrying... just ask for the dr.
    >
    > If you need specific help, leave your email address & we'll try to contact
    > you.
    >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    MrRx wrote:
    > in Massachusetts *677 is for MA State Police

    Yes. *MSP. Although I thought it was just *77.

    Ohio wins the prize for dumbest star-code to reach the highway patrol!

    *990

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, http://JustThe.net/
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) / sjsobol@JustThe.net
    PGP Key available from your friendly local key server (0xE3AE35ED)
    Apple Valley, California Nothing scares me anymore. I have three kids.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Begin dr.wireMORE quote:

    ; I just received a mail message a "sad story" that someone using verizon
    ; wireless contacted emergency help by pressing *677. Encouraging people to
    ; pass-it-on. Has anyone ever heard of this? Or the story? If true, I'd
    ; like to help pass it on; if not, then I'd like to nip it in the bud, because
    ; someone needing help might actually believe it.

    Well, around these parts (Massachusetts), *77 gets you the State
    Police, who can then transfer you to whatever emergency service you
    need when you tell them you're on a cellular. This dial code is
    cross-carrier, so it doesn't matter if you're on Verizon, Sprint, AT&T,
    or whatever.

    Plain 911<send> also goes to the State Police when called from a
    cellular. My phone has that pre-programmed into the speed dial
    position 9.

    --
    Jeffrey Kaplan www.gordol.org
    The from userid is killfiled Send personal mail to gordol

    "Laura and I really don't realize how bright our children is sometime
    until we get an objective analysis." George W. Bush, Meet the Press,
    April 15, 2000
  12. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    "Joseph" <JoeOfSeattle@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:3v25n0tii0h8o1p2cnpfnebn8uejs62clf@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 12:46:36 GMT, "Elector" <elector@my-deja.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>I noticed that in Parts of
    >>Canada I travel in the 411 which is Directory assistance here was
    >>used
    >>for the emergency services. (it may have changed by now)
    >
    > Balderdash! 411 has *never* been used for emergency services
    > anywhere
    > in North America. 911 has been the emergency number for over thirty
    > years. If 911 wasn't available people were always instructed to
    > dial
    > '0' for operator. 311 is *starting* to be used in many areas for
    > non-emergency police. Hardly universal though.
    >
    > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    >

    On the yellow and blue Emergency Services Vehicles in Montreal they
    sign stated Dial 411 for emergency service.
    I have not looked in awhile but if I go up there again in the future I
    will be looking for the vehicle and will snap a digital photo to see
    if I was correct. I also thought the 411 was for directory assistance
    that is why it struck me so strange.

    Elector
  13. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    In Colorado, the State Patrol (CSP) wanted to encourage people to call when
    they see a drunk driver, but didn't think it was 'emergency' enough to call
    911. So, they added *DUI (*384), then expanded it to report road rage, *CSP
    (*276). I'm sure it got some response when they first intiated it. But I'm
    sure it was soon forgotten.

    Bill Radio
    Click for Western U.S. Wireless Reviews at:
    http://www.mountainwireless.com


    "Steve Sobol" <sjsobol@JustThe.net> wrote in message
    news:cku4fo$goh$1@ratbert.glorb.com...
    > >
    > This is like the specific star codes many states have set up for the state
    > police departments.
    >
  14. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Jeffrey Kaplan wrote:


    > Well, around these parts (Massachusetts), *77 gets you the State
    > Police, who can then transfer you to whatever emergency service you
    > need when you tell them you're on a cellular. This dial code is
    > cross-carrier, so it doesn't matter if you're on Verizon, Sprint, AT&T,
    > or whatever.
    >
    > Plain 911<send> also goes to the State Police when called from a
    > cellular. My phone has that pre-programmed into the speed dial
    > position 9.
    >
    Most of the alternate numbers are strictly related to call density
    by the various agencies. They all want the calls for staffing
    numbers; public safety is a secondary consideration. I spent 20 years
    in emergency services and was disgusted by the petty politics that
    went on with the advent of 911... Everyone should be bitching...
    There should be ONE number with all resources controlled from there.

    --
    Jim
  15. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 08:11:55 -0700, Joseph <JoeOfSeattle@yahoo.com>
    wrote:

    >If you're in an emergency why would you not use anything else other
    >than 911? That's what it's there for!

    Sometimes, it's quicker to dial *47 (*HP) and reach the highway patrol
    dispatcher faster than going through the 911 center, only to have them
    transfer you to HP dispatch anyways.
  16. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    In article <eom6n01jdu66u981m1dg3g8mog949pvsll@4ax.com>,
    The Ghost of General Lee <ghost@general.lee> wrote:
    >On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 08:11:55 -0700, Joseph <JoeOfSeattle@yahoo.com>
    >wrote:
    >
    >Sometimes, it's quicker to dial *47 (*HP) and reach the highway patrol
    >dispatcher faster than going through the 911 center, only to have them
    >transfer you to HP dispatch anyways.

    In California, cellular 911 goes to the Highway Patrol, who can transfer
    the call to other agencies as required. The assumption (when this was
    set up years ago) was that most cellular 911 calls were from people in
    cars. Not a particularly valid assumption any more. And when there is
    an accident, they get hundreds of call reporting the incident, meaning
    that anyone with an unrelated problem is out of luck.

    We also have cellular call boxes every 1/4 mile or so on our major
    highways in most counties. These also go to the Highway Patrol, but
    the public has been advised to NOT use these to report emergencies,
    since they are lower priority than cellular 911, and are assumed to be
    used for things like breakdowns.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    While 911 remains THE emergency number for USA and most of Canada, many
    specific highways and police departments with limited enforcement areas and
    *shared* 911 facilities use their own 3-digit code to cut down on the transfer
    time.

    Foorinstance, driving along the Atlantic City <NJ> Expressway, I can get the 911
    center that'll hand me off to the state police responsible for that particular
    roade, or dial *223 (*ACE) and get 'em faster.

    While it is advertised every few miles *along* these roadways, it is *not*
    advertised off of them, primarilly to prevent confusion when folks are at their
    most confuseable.

    So someone dialing random numbers will occasionally hit one of these things.

    What else is new? I'd just like to find a way to kill the GPS on my Moto V60i on
    some emergency calls and convince them to boost the firmware to let it function
    as a general GPS reciever for my laptop.

    <I'd probably never use the first, but I want it *there* because I'm pissed off
    about *ever* having to give *any information* to law enfoprcement unless I'm a
    suspect or victim, and therefore protected. Like the Patriot brout out the
    facist in US law enforcers, it brought out the" Take to the streets and protect
    our library reading rights<1>" in me>

    While a decent GPS reciever for the job is under $100, why duplicate devices? I
    drive a small car.

    TrAl

    <1>WHILE YOU WEREN'T LOOKING because you were under a cloud of FEAR, little of
    it justified, the Patriot Act gave the cops the ability to demand libraries turn
    over your records to you, ditto book stores and audio/vidio sales&rental shops.

    That was just ONE set of rights you lost with that law because the White House,
    more than the terrorists had us affraid.

    These days, librarians routinely destroy records once books are returned. But
    government folks can be a bit strange - Attorney General Ashcroft spent hundreds
    of thousands of taxpayer dollars <well, actually BORROWED money, but who's
    looking> checking out our foreign embassies for polidactyl cats ("Money cats",
    the ones with extra toes) which he linked with some kind of evil demonic force.
    He didn't even get his superstition rght, and said he was looking for "calico
    cats" which are domestic cats that are mostly white with clearly defined patches
    of black and red.

    He also spent several tens of thousands to conceal the statue of Justice in the
    rotunda in the DoJ building because she had one brass breast exposed.

    Maybe the real War Hero will win this time out.
  18. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Bill Radio wrote:
    > In Colorado, the State Patrol (CSP) wanted to encourage people to call when
    > they see a drunk driver, but didn't think it was 'emergency' enough to call
    > 911. So, they added *DUI (*384), then expanded it to report road rage, *CSP
    > (*276). I'm sure it got some response when they first intiated it. But I'm
    > sure it was soon forgotten.

    OT: I remember 800-GRAB-DUI being advertised for DUI purposes on the back of
    Ohio Highway Patrol cruisers. Do any other states use 800-GRAB-DUI?

    --
    JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, http://JustThe.net/
    Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) / sjsobol@JustThe.net
    PGP Key available from your friendly local key server (0xE3AE35ED)
    Apple Valley, California Nothing scares me anymore. I have three kids.
  19. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    On Fri, 22 Oct 2004 20:50:56 -0700, Steve Sobol <sjsobol@JustThe.net>
    wrote:

    >OT: I remember 800-GRAB-DUI being advertised for DUI purposes on the back of
    >Ohio Highway Patrol cruisers. Do any other states use 800-GRAB-DUI?

    Not that I've ever seen. In SC, it's *DUI and you get HP dispatch.
    In fact, a google search yealds the following:

    http://www.statepatrol.ohio.gov/programs/GRABDUI.HTML

    It seems it's just for Ohio. I don't even remember seeing it when I
    was in Dayton last summer, but then, I wasn't really paying *that*
    much attention to the back of OHP cars. I think I only saw about 3 or
    4 OHP the entire week.

    Here's MADD's list of numbers:

    http://www.madd.org/aboutus/0,1056,1641,00.html
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