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How long do most gamign computers last ?

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May 8, 2011 4:20:24 PM

im just wondering because im making the switch from console to pc

More about : long gamign computers

May 8, 2011 5:08:27 PM

depends if you get a decent 1 at the start of a cycle like a q6600 and 8800gts
then it could last 5-7 years.
if you bought a q6600 in 2006 you could still play any game currently out 5 years later.
the 8800gts came out end of 2006/beginning 2007 so thats 4 years for that and it will probably still be able to play games for another 2-3 years although at more and more reduced settings.
basically a pc gaming cycle is about the same as the life cycle of a console at the moment. so 5-7 years
May 8, 2011 5:11:43 PM

saying that most enthusiasts will have minor upgrades like adding an extra gfx card or more memory for 2 or so years, then a major overhaul every 2-3 years. selling on most of the old kit and buying a pretty much full new setup.
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May 8, 2011 7:46:20 PM

I built a pair of systems for my wife and I in late 2006, using 8800gtx's (bought on the week of release) and e6600 processors, those systems are still going strong today in the hands of my oldest two sons, and still play any game at 1680 x 1050, these days with anaglyph 3d added, a few titles require you to throttle back the eye candy a bit, but none to the point where graphics can be described as poor.

There is a myth that high end pcs become obsolete fast. They might get surpassed in performance, but a top spec system can have a very long life span in gaming. I expect those rigs to be playing new releases still in two years time. Sure the settings gradually creep down but ONLY as and when graphics quality goes up!

If a graphics card produces graphics that amaze you today,it will most likelly produce that same quality in new titles in 5 years time! A graphics card doesn't lose quality over time. Settings only require downgrading when overall graphics quality goes up. Your new card will still produce much the same quality images at much the same FPS many years down the line!

May 8, 2011 11:34:32 PM

It depends on your expectations...

If you always want the best performance in a game with the highest graphics quality, then you'll be updating your system on a fairly regular basis. About every year since PC games tends to push the performance envelope more than a console because the hardware in a console never changes. A good example is the original Crysis game. It was harsh on new hardware when it was released back in early 2007 and even high end computers in 2010 had a hard time running it with high frame rates with every graphics setting maxed out.

If you can live with medium quality graphics, then a good gaming PC can last you 4 years or so depending on the game, your overall system and the resolution you play at.
May 9, 2011 12:39:58 AM

As long as you build one on relyable parts and at least midrange graphics(go ahead and get something that will last a long time) it should last you about 5-8 years at least as long as you keep it cool, dont' over clock and clean out the fans and inside of the case every month or so.
May 9, 2011 2:17:35 PM

fearitzfizz said:
im just wondering because im making the switch from console to pc


You've gotten some good advice so far, but make no mistake--PC gaming is much more expensive than console gaming. Blockbuster games are usually as the same amount of money on each platform, but PC hardware costs much more (and consequentially, is capable of more).

In April 2009, I built the following system for roughly $1400:

i7-920, EVGA Mobo, V8 cooler, 6GB ram, Radeon HD 4870, 2x WD HDs in Raid 0, 750w Corsair PSU, Vista 64, and a Lian Li case.

Since then, I have replaced the cooler, doubled the ram, replaced the GPU twice (once to a 460, now to a 570 that's in the mail), added an SSD, swapped the PSU for a modular one, swapped the case, upgraded to Win7, and gotten a better keyboard/mouse/headphones.

Some of the stuff I have sold to recoup the money (a new GTX 570 @ $315 minus $120 for my old 460 is only a net cost of $195), and other stuff I have moved into other computers around the house (the wife's, HTPC, etc.).

Bottom line? It's more money, but the satisfaction factor is higher (you built in!), and you learn more every time you build a new one.
May 11, 2011 11:53:50 PM

Mozart25 said:
You've gotten some good advice so far, but make no mistake--PC gaming is much more expensive than console gaming. Blockbuster games are usually as the same amount of money on each platform, but PC hardware costs much more (and consequentially, is capable of more).

In April 2009, I built the following system for roughly $1400:

i7-920, EVGA Mobo, V8 cooler, 6GB ram, Radeon HD 4870, 2x WD HDs in Raid 0, 750w Corsair PSU, Vista 64, and a Lian Li case.

Since then, I have replaced the cooler, doubled the ram, replaced the GPU twice (once to a 460, now to a 570 that's in the mail), added an SSD, swapped the PSU for a modular one, swapped the case, upgraded to Win7, and gotten a better keyboard/mouse/headphones.

Some of the stuff I have sold to recoup the money (a new GTX 570 @ $315 minus $120 for my old 460 is only a net cost of $195), and other stuff I have moved into other computers around the house (the wife's, HTPC, etc.).

Bottom line? It's more money, but the satisfaction factor is higher (you built in!), and you learn more every time you build a new one.

Alot of what you changed was not going to give a big performance gain if any. 6GB of ram is fine SSD is mostly load times modular PSU is only going to help with cable management and unless your case was way to small swapping to a diff case was ascetic at best . In reality if yuo get a good CPU and GPU at time of purchase a PC can be cheaper. If you consider that most people will have a PC anyway......A $400 desktop internet/school/work PC plus a $600 ps3 (when first released) thats $1000. If you were to build a $1000 pc at the time the PS3 came out you would be in good shape. Then later you can add a second GPU and you now have a $1200 system that is up to date where getting a new console would take you past the $1200 mark. CPUs seem to last much much longer than GPU tech so as long as you get a quality CPU and GPU then add another GPU as it runs out of steam your system is both cost effective and long lasting :)  Also lets not forget the fact that PC's dont have to be upgraded to play newer games but if a new console come out you HAVE to buy it to play the games and in most cases can lose some if not all backward compatibility. Then there is the fact that after some time you get emulators on a PC so you can play the older console games for free lol.
May 12, 2011 12:37:29 AM

TitusFFX said:
As long as you build one on relyable parts and at least midrange graphics(go ahead and get something that will last a long time) it should last you about 5-8 years at least as long as you keep it cool, dont' over clock and clean out the fans and inside of the case every month or so.


8 years?

Do you think really think a PC built 8 years ago can play most modern / popular games somewhat decently now?

8 years ago the best graphics cards was probably the Radeon 9800 XT and nVidia FX 5900U. Those cards were in excess of $400. Crysis 2 is an example of a current game that really does not have very high requirements (especially compared to Crysis or Metro 2033). Those cards do not meet the minimum requirements. Portal 2 is a no go for those video cards as well. Fallout 3 was released back in 2008 and those cards are not supported by the game.

However, those cards can be used to play the Sims 3.
May 12, 2011 2:41:31 AM

>.> had a video card that lasted me for about that time but it was a top end though lol was a 7950 GX2 ^.^ still one of the only cards you can get quad sli out of only 2 cards.
May 12, 2011 2:47:17 AM

TitusFFX said:
As long as you build one on relyable parts and at least midrange graphics(go ahead and get something that will last a long time) it should last you about 5-8 years at least as long as you keep it cool, dont' over clock and clean out the fans and inside of the case every month or so.

I don't think overclocking or reasonably high temperatures will shorten the life span of a computer enough to make it die before it's obsolete.
May 12, 2011 2:56:51 AM

we have been relatively lucky this cycle as the games consoles have dictated the quality of most games and will do for the next 18 months to 2 years. dont expect the same from the next cycle. that may only be 5 years. due to cheaper dev costs and hardware costs. especially from sony who will drop the cell for an off the shelf cpu for the new playstation.
May 12, 2011 2:57:45 AM

ooh lets see a 2500k ps3
boss mode
May 12, 2011 3:03:52 AM

>.> PS4 with upgradable video card and processor for the ones who want to play harder! (in small print....*proprietary hardware only*)
May 12, 2011 3:04:23 AM

sounds...true
May 12, 2011 4:01:35 AM

jaguarskx said:
8 years?

Do you think really think a PC built 8 years ago can play most modern / popular games somewhat decently now?

8 years ago the best graphics cards was probably the Radeon 9800 XT and nVidia FX 5900U. .



My brother was playing on a 9800XT from 2003-4 until just this month. It was a hand-me-down and it finally started artifacting. He could play many games, albeit at med/low settings. But here were a few newer titles that he couldn't play. He now has an AMD 955 BE/570GTX that will last him a long time.

I think the biggest consideration is how long will the current gen of consoles will be around. Since most games are console dependent in terms of graphics, as long as the consoles are around graphics will not improve much. So if there is no console refresh until 2014, you can expect graphics will not improve much in the next 2.5 years.
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