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"Scanner not found" workaround.

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Anonymous
a b α HP
May 31, 2005 1:55:59 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

Hi,

I've been aware of the "Scanner not found" problem since the Windows 98
days. The old HP officially sanctioned workaround used to be to unplug
the AC power, wait about 60 seconds, plug it back in, pray, then try to
scan, and if that didn't work, repeat the process again, and again,
etc.

I just found a workaround that works every time (at least on XP SP2):
Go into the Windows "Task Manager" then do an "End Process" on
"hplamp.exe". Retry your scan.

Much faster and a lot less agrivating.

Regards,
Brcobrem
Anonymous
a b α HP
June 1, 2005 12:56:42 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

Hi Christian,

Thank you for your input on this too. I'll wire up the scsi interface
if my "tasmgr" method stops being reliable.

Also - I have found the "MSO Document Scanning" program that ships with
Microsoft Office Professional 2003" to be vastly superior to the old
"HP PrecisionScanPro 1.02" software that shipped with these scanners.
Start up the "MSO Document Scanning" program, press the Scanner button,
choose Microsoft's XP's "Hewlett-Packard Scanjet 6200C" as the source,
and choose the preset "Black and white from color page". This prints
black and white copies than are better than my copy machine, even with
my DeskJet 890c in draft mode.

I still have the HP PrecisionScan Pro 3.0 driver available, but the
"Hewlett-Packard Scanjet 6200C" driver is noticably better.

Regards,
Brcobrem
Anonymous
a b α HP
June 1, 2005 3:44:34 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

On the seventh day, Brcobrem wrote...

> I've been aware of the "Scanner not found" problem since the Windows 98
> days. The old HP officially sanctioned workaround used to be to unplug
> the AC power, wait about 60 seconds, plug it back in, pray, then try to
> scan, and if that didn't work, repeat the process again, and again,
> etc.
>
> I just found a workaround that works every time (at least on XP SP2):
> Go into the Windows "Task Manager" then do an "End Process" on
> "hplamp.exe". Retry your scan.

last year I tried that myself, but it didn't always work. Best solution
remains to install your scanner using SCSI if you can.

--
mit freundlichen Grüßen/with kind regards
Christian Dürrhauer, Institute of Geography, FU Berlin

You call this relaxing? I'm a nervous wreck. If I'm not careful
I'll end up talking to myself. - McCoy, "Star Trek V"
Related resources
Anonymous
a b α HP
June 2, 2005 2:23:32 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

On the seventh day, Brcobrem wrote...

> Also - I have found the "MSO Document Scanning" program that ships with
> Microsoft Office Professional 2003" to be vastly superior to the old
> "HP PrecisionScanPro 1.02" software that shipped with these scanners.
> Start up the "MSO Document Scanning" program, press the Scanner button,
> choose Microsoft's XP's "Hewlett-Packard Scanjet 6200C" as the source,
> and choose the preset "Black and white from color page". This prints
> black and white copies than are better than my copy machine, even with
> my DeskJet 890c in draft mode.
>
> I still have the HP PrecisionScan Pro 3.0 driver available, but the
> "Hewlett-Packard Scanjet 6200C" driver is noticably better.

thanks for your valuable insight. I consider that in the future if it fails
on me again :-)

--
mit freundlichen Grüßen/with kind regards
Christian Dürrhauer, Institute of Geography, FU Berlin

You call this relaxing? I'm a nervous wreck. If I'm not careful
I'll end up talking to myself. - McCoy, "Star Trek V"
Anonymous
a b α HP
June 4, 2005 3:02:07 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

Hi,

Well, it failed on me again via the USB connection (for the hundredth
time). So I'm going to go with Christian's suggestion and go Scsi.

For those who may be interested, my motherboard has a scsi chip on it
that provides a 50 pin Scsi1 connector, a 68 pin Scsi2 connector, and a
68 pin Ultra Scsi2 connector. The motherboard-to-backplate adapter that
came with the motherboard is 68 pin. So how to go from 68 pin female on
the backplate to that 50pin miniture female on the HP Scanjet 6200C ? I
spoke to cablestogo.com and they recommended their "SCSI external
cable - HD-68 (M) - HD-50 (M) - 6 ft", P/N 08177.

The HP Specs do not mention the Scsi spec that the scannner allows, so
I'm only hoping that since it has the 50pin miniture Scsi2 connector,
that the scanner will provide the throughput of the Scsi2 specification
(10MB per sec).

Fyi:
Connector Type or Name: HD50 High Density 50-Pin
Called Mini D50, MicroDB50, MiniDB50, most 8-Bit SCSI FAST (up to
10MB/sec) host adapters use this "high density 50-pin" connector.
50-pin HD50 connector is 1 3/8" (36mm) wide vs. 1 7/8" (47mm) wide for
a 68-pin HD68 connector. Used on SCSI-2 and SCSI-3 peripherals.

Later,
Brcobrem
Anonymous
a b α HP
June 5, 2005 2:23:15 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

There are various and sundry ways to share a SCSI bus between 50-pin narrow and
68-pin wide. A cable is one way to do it. Make sure that the scanner's SCSI ID
does not conflict any other devices... Ben Myers

On 4 Jun 2005 11:02:07 -0700, "Brcobrem" <brcobrem@hotmail.com> wrote:

>Hi,
>
>Well, it failed on me again via the USB connection (for the hundredth
>time). So I'm going to go with Christian's suggestion and go Scsi.
>
>For those who may be interested, my motherboard has a scsi chip on it
>that provides a 50 pin Scsi1 connector, a 68 pin Scsi2 connector, and a
>68 pin Ultra Scsi2 connector. The motherboard-to-backplate adapter that
>came with the motherboard is 68 pin. So how to go from 68 pin female on
>the backplate to that 50pin miniture female on the HP Scanjet 6200C ? I
>spoke to cablestogo.com and they recommended their "SCSI external
>cable - HD-68 (M) - HD-50 (M) - 6 ft", P/N 08177.
>
>The HP Specs do not mention the Scsi spec that the scannner allows, so
>I'm only hoping that since it has the 50pin miniture Scsi2 connector,
>that the scanner will provide the throughput of the Scsi2 specification
>(10MB per sec).
>
>Fyi:
>Connector Type or Name: HD50 High Density 50-Pin
>Called Mini D50, MicroDB50, MiniDB50, most 8-Bit SCSI FAST (up to
>10MB/sec) host adapters use this "high density 50-pin" connector.
>50-pin HD50 connector is 1 3/8" (36mm) wide vs. 1 7/8" (47mm) wide for
>a 68-pin HD68 connector. Used on SCSI-2 and SCSI-3 peripherals.
>
>Later,
>Brcobrem
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
June 5, 2005 3:38:28 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

On the seventh day, Brcobrem wrote...

> Well, it failed on me again via the USB connection (for the hundredth
> time). So I'm going to go with Christian's suggestion and go Scsi.

:-(

> For those who may be interested, my motherboard has a scsi chip on it
> that provides a 50 pin Scsi1 connector, a 68 pin Scsi2 connector, and a
> 68 pin Ultra Scsi2 connector. The motherboard-to-backplate adapter that
> came with the motherboard is 68 pin. So how to go from 68 pin female on
> the backplate to that 50pin miniture female on the HP Scanjet 6200C ? I
> spoke to cablestogo.com and they recommended their "SCSI external
> cable - HD-68 (M) - HD-50 (M) - 6 ft", P/N 08177.

Don't (repeat: don't!) do it this way if you can prevent it! Assuming the
68pin backplate connector is used to connect to the Ultra Wide 2 SCSI part
of your controller (which is almost certain since I haven't heard of
anything else), this will not only decrease the allowed cable length for
LVD scsi (also called Ultra Wide 2 SCSI, used in U160 and U320 too), it
will limit the number of devices possible and finally decrease speed for
all LVD devices. You can also get into all kinds of trouble.

> The HP Specs do not mention the Scsi spec that the scannner allows, so
> I'm only hoping that since it has the 50pin miniture Scsi2 connector,
> that the scanner will provide the throughput of the Scsi2 specification
> (10MB per sec).

that's right, that's Fast SCSI 2.

> Fyi:
> Connector Type or Name: HD50 High Density 50-Pin
> Called Mini D50, MicroDB50, MiniDB50, most 8-Bit SCSI FAST (up to
> 10MB/sec) host adapters use this "high density 50-pin" connector.
> 50-pin HD50 connector is 1 3/8" (36mm) wide vs. 1 7/8" (47mm) wide for
> a 68-pin HD68 connector. Used on SCSI-2 and SCSI-3 peripherals.

the better way to do it is to get an internal cable with 50pin-50pin
connectors (so-called HDC50). You'd better think twice if you might need
some internal connectors for devices like streamer and so on in the future
(however, such devices are getting pretty scarce nowadays, most come with
68pin connectors for wide ultra/single-ended or wide ultra 2 (LVD)).

But be careful: the cable length for that bus mustn't exceed 3m in total,
that means you have to count the cable for the scanner as well.
The second part you need is a 50pin to 50pin Sub-HD (HDC50 to HD50) slot
bezel (you lose one PCI/ISA slot). The external cable you need has two HD50
connectors. Check for the cable thickness - usually such cables need to be
pretty thick for quality otherwise they are known to cause problems. AFAIK
the scanner doesn't need to be terminated (might have auto-termination,
mine is running flawlessly). Should you ever get some internal devices, you
mustn't terminate them. Be also careful to not Y-connect the bus (meaning
that you must connect the adaptor to the end of the internal cable).
Interesting reading:
http://www.ramelectronics.net/html/scsi_connecters.html

HTH

--
mit freundlichen Grüßen/with kind regards
Christian Dürrhauer, Institute of Geography, FU Berlin

Little Golden Book That Never Made It: Dad's New Wife Robert
Anonymous
a b α HP
June 5, 2005 6:43:04 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

For all the reasons you mention, Christian, I would recommend a separate SCSI
host adapter for the scanner. Something like an Adaptec 2900-series, which are
old, reliable, and fully supported by most any operating system. But the
adapter should not be a "wide" with a W suffix, which have only 68-pin external
connectors.

Use of a separate adapter eliminates any problem with conflicts among SE and LVD
devices... Ben Myers

On Sun, 5 Jun 2005 11:38:28 +0200, Christian =?ISO-8859-1?Q?D=FCrrhauer?=
<cduerr@geog.fu-berlin.de> wrote:

>On the seventh day, Brcobrem wrote...
>
>> Well, it failed on me again via the USB connection (for the hundredth
>> time). So I'm going to go with Christian's suggestion and go Scsi.
>
>:-(
>
>> For those who may be interested, my motherboard has a scsi chip on it
>> that provides a 50 pin Scsi1 connector, a 68 pin Scsi2 connector, and a
>> 68 pin Ultra Scsi2 connector. The motherboard-to-backplate adapter that
>> came with the motherboard is 68 pin. So how to go from 68 pin female on
>> the backplate to that 50pin miniture female on the HP Scanjet 6200C ? I
>> spoke to cablestogo.com and they recommended their "SCSI external
>> cable - HD-68 (M) - HD-50 (M) - 6 ft", P/N 08177.
>
>Don't (repeat: don't!) do it this way if you can prevent it! Assuming the
>68pin backplate connector is used to connect to the Ultra Wide 2 SCSI part
>of your controller (which is almost certain since I haven't heard of
>anything else), this will not only decrease the allowed cable length for
>LVD scsi (also called Ultra Wide 2 SCSI, used in U160 and U320 too), it
>will limit the number of devices possible and finally decrease speed for
>all LVD devices. You can also get into all kinds of trouble.
>
>> The HP Specs do not mention the Scsi spec that the scannner allows, so
>> I'm only hoping that since it has the 50pin miniture Scsi2 connector,
>> that the scanner will provide the throughput of the Scsi2 specification
>> (10MB per sec).
>
>that's right, that's Fast SCSI 2.
>
>> Fyi:
>> Connector Type or Name: HD50 High Density 50-Pin
>> Called Mini D50, MicroDB50, MiniDB50, most 8-Bit SCSI FAST (up to
>> 10MB/sec) host adapters use this "high density 50-pin" connector.
>> 50-pin HD50 connector is 1 3/8" (36mm) wide vs. 1 7/8" (47mm) wide for
>> a 68-pin HD68 connector. Used on SCSI-2 and SCSI-3 peripherals.
>
>the better way to do it is to get an internal cable with 50pin-50pin
>connectors (so-called HDC50). You'd better think twice if you might need
>some internal connectors for devices like streamer and so on in the future
>(however, such devices are getting pretty scarce nowadays, most come with
>68pin connectors for wide ultra/single-ended or wide ultra 2 (LVD)).
>
>But be careful: the cable length for that bus mustn't exceed 3m in total,
>that means you have to count the cable for the scanner as well.
>The second part you need is a 50pin to 50pin Sub-HD (HDC50 to HD50) slot
>bezel (you lose one PCI/ISA slot). The external cable you need has two HD50
>connectors. Check for the cable thickness - usually such cables need to be
>pretty thick for quality otherwise they are known to cause problems. AFAIK
>the scanner doesn't need to be terminated (might have auto-termination,
>mine is running flawlessly). Should you ever get some internal devices, you
>mustn't terminate them. Be also careful to not Y-connect the bus (meaning
>that you must connect the adaptor to the end of the internal cable).
>Interesting reading:
>http://www.ramelectronics.net/html/scsi_connecters.html
>
>HTH
>
>--
>mit freundlichen Grüßen/with kind regards
>Christian Dürrhauer, Institute of Geography, FU Berlin
>
>Little Golden Book That Never Made It: Dad's New Wife Robert
Anonymous
a b α HP
June 6, 2005 12:52:52 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

On the seventh day, ben_myers_spam_me_not wrote...

> For all the reasons you mention, Christian, I would recommend a separate SCSI
> host adapter for the scanner. Something like an Adaptec 2900-series, which are
> old, reliable, and fully supported by most any operating system. But the
> adapter should not be a "wide" with a W suffix, which have only 68-pin external
> connectors.
>
> Use of a separate adapter eliminates any problem with conflicts among SE and LVD
> devices... Ben Myers

good idea, Ben. If he has a PCI slot to spare that might be something worth
looking into it.

--
mit freundlichen Grüßen/with kind regards
Christian Dürrhauer, Institute of Geography, FU Berlin

Little Golden Book That Never Made It: Dad's New Wife Robert
February 19, 2010 9:28:21 PM

Ok I know this thread is really OLD but... I recently had to dust off my old HP 7400c with XPA attachment and ran into the same problem everyone here is having. I spent several hours messing with this and found a solution. Apparently HP installed drivers from a different location (temp folder it creates?) and uses that location when looking for the drivers.

The solution:
in device manager select your scanner and right click
select update driver
select no not this time, next
install from a list.. next
Don't search..., next
Have disk,
browse to C:\Program Files\Hewlett-Packard\PrecisionScan Pro 3.0\Migrate\hpg64sti.inf
click open
click OK,
click next.

After that open your HP software and it should no longer say "scanner not found".

Hope this helps someone.
April 19, 2010 6:19:15 PM

SynapsE, your solution worked like a charm. And it's easy-peasy as well! Many thanks - this saved me hours, I'm sure.
August 19, 2010 3:25:30 AM

I used my HP7400C with a Pentium III 550MHz coputer for many years with various Adaptec 2900 series cards fitted.

I got a second user Dell 420 (dual 1GHz Xeon) with on board SCSI, I had numerous problems with the scans stopping half way through and then needing to reboot. I even experimented with a 1 foot long SCSI cable. I put the 2940 card in and had the same problems, although at first there wasn't.

I went back to the P3 and it soon developed the same lock freeze problem. I also tried 2940 and 2940U2W cards. The advantage of the 2904 have been the 2 metre SCSI cable that worked for years and not restriciting internal and externa; 50 pin calbes to under 2 metres.

I gave up on the SCSI and put in a USB 2 card on the P3 and use that. At least if it locks - sometimes when I cancel a scan - I can just pull out the USB and plug it back in - I don't have to reboot.

As the scanner is 9 years old perhaps it is time to get a more modern one with better scan quality. As it didn't come with a document feeder I still have the even older 4C, if it still works and still haven't scanned the old manuals that I wanted to.

My other computers run Win7 are 64 bit and I haven't tried to install the HP7400C on them First Adaptec didn't have drivers for my SCSI card but now they do and I have the USB choice as well. Vuescan includes it's own drivers for both my Minolta film scanner and the HP and may be worth trying out.
June 3, 2012 9:59:54 AM

This actually worked! ((I had this problem for years)) Thank you so much SynapsE you are Awesome, I printed a copy of your instructions and am keeping it with my Scanner installation pack.

SynapsE said:
Ok I know this thread is really OLD but... I recently had to dust off my old HP 7400c with XPA attachment and ran into the same problem everyone here is having. I spent several hours messing with this and found a solution. Apparently HP installed drivers from a different location (temp folder it creates?) and uses that location when looking for the drivers.

The solution:
in device manager select your scanner and right click
select update driver
select no not this time, next
install from a list.. next
Don't search..., next
Have disk,
browse to C:\Program Files\Hewlett-Packard\PrecisionScan Pro 3.0\Migrate\hpg64sti.inf
click open
click OK,
click next.

After that open your HP software and it should no longer say "scanner not found".

Hope this helps someone.
a b α HP
June 3, 2012 1:49:03 PM

Thread was from 7 years ago!
!