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Deleting an Admin account

Last response: in Windows XP
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April 6, 2005 4:54:57 PM

I normally use the Administrator account on my laptop. It's the only one I've ever used. Foretting I could just turn on the guest account, I created a temporary account for a friend to use. Winodws only wanted to let me create it as an Admin account also since technically you're supposed to create such an account for yourself and not use the actual admin one. Problem is that now I can't delete the temporary admin account, nor does the real admin account show up in the welcome screen anymore (I have to log in the old-fashioned way now). How do I delete that temporary admin account?

Thanks!

-- Ah sh*t! sys64738 --

More about : deleting admin account

April 7, 2005 12:39:17 AM

I already changed the login style to old school so I can simply type Administrator and my pw to get into my normal account, but it still won't let me delete the other admin account. I'm sure Windows sees it as the only user account with admin rights and therefore thinks it would be bad to delete it. This is driving me nuts!

I never understood why MS would put a default admin account in Windows but not intend it to be used by the owner of the computer. As far as I can tell it's the same thing as the admin account you create for daily use. That's why I've always used the actual admin account for daily use.

-- Ah sh*t! sys64738 --
April 7, 2005 12:57:45 AM

When logged in as administrator right click on mycomputer and go to manage. Then go to "local users and groups", "users". The account you created should show up in there, just right click on it and hit delete.

<A HREF="http://www.folken.net/myrig.htm" target="_new">My precious...</A>
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April 7, 2005 2:07:24 AM

Folken, thank you! That did the trick. One last question, is it safe to delete "Help Assistant" and "Support_38" accounts? I assume it is but you know what happens when you assume... You make an A$$ of U and ME. :D 

-- Ah sh*t! sys64738 --
April 7, 2005 2:24:03 AM

Those are probably there incase you need support from microsoft or something. I'd leave them there and disabled just in case, can't harm anything by leavin em there.

<A HREF="http://www.folken.net/myrig.htm" target="_new">My precious...</A>
April 7, 2005 1:01:35 PM

I don't think it lets you delete those accounts.

______________
Welcome to my Shed of Pleasure
April 8, 2005 7:14:00 PM

I'm amazed it took that many posts to resolve that issue which I found to be really simple...
The main admin account is there just incase something happens to your password.. ANYTHING and EVERYTHING in the computer world has a backdoor built into it.. say you lost your password and you had access to nothing else.. You log in as the main admin account to reset it.. It's basically a safety account.

When working with Domains, you have your enterprise admin account which is your highest level.. and it's never used. Then you have a level lower of admin accounts that get used to set most things up.. In case something happens, there is always a back up to get on to change passwords or have ultimate access over everything else... Which is why you should never use just the main account because you have no backup if something goes wrong...

Riser
April 11, 2005 4:46:49 AM

My thinking is, the fewer accounts on the machine, the fewer opportunities for someone to break down the back door. Maybe I'm just paranoid.

-- Ah sh*t! sys64738 --
April 11, 2005 2:38:12 PM

Standard practice is to delete the admin account AFTER you created a new admin account.. delete administrator, create an account like "junior" or something to be your true admin account.
Why? Because everyone knows Administrator is the admin account on a windows server or PC.. get rid of that and it'll be a hell of a time for them to figure out what the admin account is.
Common problem with corporate networks.. a lot of companies give away user login IDs because that's their email..
ex. user id is: Jsmith and the email is jsmith@company.com.
A lot of companies are moving to assigning employee IDs for their login while using the name for email.. this eliminates finding the User ID.. which is really the absolute first step is reducing attempts to log into accounts..

Riser
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