Help!

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Hi everyone,

Ok I'm new to newsgroups but mainly very new to wireless networks.

Truthfully I'm not sure where to start, my old computer which I'm currently
using is very old and due for the skip soon! My new computer arrives this
Saturday.

This computer is connected on a 2mb Broadband Cable connection provided by
Telewest (A UK ISP)
Its a Ethernet connection but when the new computer comes i want the new
computer to go downstairs as this is all currently wired upstairs.
I could get Telewest to come re-cable and have the new computer hard wired
downstairs but its hassle which is what got me onto the idea of Wireless!
I've looked around on the net and its seems to say i need a wireless router
and a wireless usb port ??

I want to keep the Cable modem upstairs on it's own not attached to anything
and have the new computer downstairs attached wirelessly to the modem
upstairs. Is this possible. What i've read so far is mainly for having one
computer hard wired to the network and having other computers attached to
the broadband connection via wireless.
However i just want 1 computer attached but i'd prefer the cable modem to be
in 1 room and the computer in another.
And is a wireless router what i need and a wireless usb attachment? where do
they go ! i haven't a clue sorry.

Thanks for any help, hope it sort of makes sense!
4 answers Last reply
More about help
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    There are a number of things you can do, the USB wireless adapters work OK
    but I've had a lot of problems with these devices due to weak signal.
    Option 1:
    You have better luck purchasing a PCI wireless card. You will need a
    wireless AP to provide the connectivity to the computer downstairs.
    Opiton 2:
    You can setup a peer-to-peer network but you will have to have 2 wireless
    cards and just do internet connection sharing through the ethernet of the
    device connected to your cable modem.

    Option 1 is your better choice for stability.

    Sean Hartling
    Skybeam High Speed Wireless Internet


    "Matt Jenkins (Personal)" <matt.jenkins@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:gSrtd.111209$F7.43072@fe1.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    > Hi everyone,
    >
    > Ok I'm new to newsgroups but mainly very new to wireless networks.
    >
    > Truthfully I'm not sure where to start, my old computer which I'm
    > currently
    > using is very old and due for the skip soon! My new computer arrives this
    > Saturday.
    >
    > This computer is connected on a 2mb Broadband Cable connection provided by
    > Telewest (A UK ISP)
    > Its a Ethernet connection but when the new computer comes i want the new
    > computer to go downstairs as this is all currently wired upstairs.
    > I could get Telewest to come re-cable and have the new computer hard wired
    > downstairs but its hassle which is what got me onto the idea of Wireless!
    > I've looked around on the net and its seems to say i need a wireless
    > router
    > and a wireless usb port ??
    >
    > I want to keep the Cable modem upstairs on it's own not attached to
    > anything
    > and have the new computer downstairs attached wirelessly to the modem
    > upstairs. Is this possible. What i've read so far is mainly for having one
    > computer hard wired to the network and having other computers attached to
    > the broadband connection via wireless.
    > However i just want 1 computer attached but i'd prefer the cable modem to
    > be
    > in 1 room and the computer in another.
    > And is a wireless router what i need and a wireless usb attachment? where
    > do
    > they go ! i haven't a clue sorry.
    >
    > Thanks for any help, hope it sort of makes sense!
    >
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "Sean" <shartling@skybeam.com> wrote in
    news:j0xtd.647$6N2.587@news.flashnewsgroups.com:

    > There are a number of things you can do, the USB wireless adapters
    > work OK but I've had a lot of problems with these devices due to weak
    > signal. Option 1:
    > You have better luck purchasing a PCI wireless card. You will need a
    > wireless AP to provide the connectivity to the computer downstairs.
    > Opiton 2:
    > You can setup a peer-to-peer network but you will have to have 2
    > wireless cards and just do internet connection sharing through the
    > ethernet of the device connected to your cable modem.
    >
    > Option 1 is your better choice for stability.
    >
    > Sean Hartling
    > Skybeam High Speed Wireless Internet
    >
    >

    In addition to this excellent advice, I'll tell you that it certainly is
    possible not to have a desktop PC connected to your router via a
    hardwire. You do, however, need a hardwire connection to configure your
    router / access point initially.

    Also, I would caution that if anything should go wrong with the router
    or access point, and you are unable to connect to it, you will need to
    connect via an ethernet cable to reconfigure and troubleshoot. This is
    not as dire as it might seem, as the workaround is quite simple: you can
    go to most computer stores and get a very long Cat 5 cable. Provided
    that you don't mind breaking this cable out of the closet, and your
    computer is within reasonable distance of the router (about 100 meters),
    when things go wrong, you should be ok. That's most likely the route
    that I would take.

    Finally, you can very often find a wireless router for about the same
    price as a standalone access point. It might behoove you to have less
    hardware and get the consolidated model. Linksys, Belkin, DLink, and
    Netgear all make excellent wireless routers that I have configured and
    used.

    The Chairman
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Thankyou so much for your replies and advice, I'm starting to understand
    whats needed.

    I think the new computer has a PCI 802.11g ? card installed already but i'm
    not 100% sure about this, so does that mean all i need is a wireless router
    that i connect to the Surfboard Cable modem i have upstairs and these two
    devices connect via a ethernet cable which is currently plugged into the
    back of this (my old) computer?

    I'm sorry if i sound thick but you mentioned about fixed AP and 'all in one'
    wireless routers, whats the difference and what is a fixed AP? I don't
    remember reading about these, however i have read about wireless routers and
    do agree that i'll probably opt for buying netgear or D-Link or something
    similar.


    "The Chairman" <monster@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:Xns95B8EFDE2D3C1monsterearthlinknet@140.99.99.130...
    > "Sean" <shartling@skybeam.com> wrote in
    > news:j0xtd.647$6N2.587@news.flashnewsgroups.com:
    >
    > > There are a number of things you can do, the USB wireless adapters
    > > work OK but I've had a lot of problems with these devices due to weak
    > > signal. Option 1:
    > > You have better luck purchasing a PCI wireless card. You will need a
    > > wireless AP to provide the connectivity to the computer downstairs.
    > > Opiton 2:
    > > You can setup a peer-to-peer network but you will have to have 2
    > > wireless cards and just do internet connection sharing through the
    > > ethernet of the device connected to your cable modem.
    > >
    > > Option 1 is your better choice for stability.
    > >
    > > Sean Hartling
    > > Skybeam High Speed Wireless Internet
    > >
    > >
    >
    > In addition to this excellent advice, I'll tell you that it certainly is
    > possible not to have a desktop PC connected to your router via a
    > hardwire. You do, however, need a hardwire connection to configure your
    > router / access point initially.
    >
    > Also, I would caution that if anything should go wrong with the router
    > or access point, and you are unable to connect to it, you will need to
    > connect via an ethernet cable to reconfigure and troubleshoot. This is
    > not as dire as it might seem, as the workaround is quite simple: you can
    > go to most computer stores and get a very long Cat 5 cable. Provided
    > that you don't mind breaking this cable out of the closet, and your
    > computer is within reasonable distance of the router (about 100 meters),
    > when things go wrong, you should be ok. That's most likely the route
    > that I would take.
    >
    > Finally, you can very often find a wireless router for about the same
    > price as a standalone access point. It might behoove you to have less
    > hardware and get the consolidated model. Linksys, Belkin, DLink, and
    > Netgear all make excellent wireless routers that I have configured and
    > used.
    >
    > The Chairman
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "Matt Jenkins \(Personal\)" <matt.jenkins@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in
    news:nfNtd.119472$F7.24969@fe1.news.blueyonder.co.uk:

    >
    > I think the new computer has a PCI 802.11g ? card installed already
    > but i'm not 100% sure about this, so does that mean all i need is a
    > wireless router that i connect to the Surfboard Cable modem i have
    > upstairs and these two devices connect via a ethernet cable which is
    > currently plugged into the back of this (my old) computer?

    Yes, that's all you need.

    > I'm sorry if i sound thick but you mentioned about fixed AP and 'all
    > in one' wireless routers, whats the difference and what is a fixed AP?
    > I don't remember reading about these, however i have read about
    > wireless routers and do agree that i'll probably opt for buying
    > netgear or D-Link or something similar.

    I don't recall anything about a "fixed" AP, but I did mention a
    standalone AP. Very basically, the difference is that a router has the
    ability to assign IP addresses, allowing multiple computers to connect
    to one another and a shared internet connection. An access point is not
    as "smart" as a router, and only provides wireless access. It doesn't
    assign individual addresses to multiple computers, and most often is
    used in combination with a router.
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