Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Second NAM

Last response: in Network Providers
Share
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 6:32:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Anyone tried this or have comments on this --

I have an account in the US with CDMA and Analog; works great here --
I also have an office in the Dominican Republic. We went to Verizon
since the phone was to work seamlessly between the two countries (
CDMA only )

Check the web site -- says "can send /receive calls in DR " -- I don't
receive calls from the US when I'm in DR, but believe I can receive
calls initiated in DR. I can't call DR when I'm in the States -- but
I can call a DR number when I am in DR.

I can call the States from DR fine -- it falls under roaming charges.

Some of the people there are telling me that the thing to do is to get
a second NAM for use in DR and "buy a card" with minutes -- that way,
when I'm in DR I can change the NAM and have a local number.

It's a business account and I'm trying to keep things somewhat
uncomplicated and easily accounted for.

Anyone ever try this or have comments on it -- local reps in both
countries are more familar with "simple setups"

Thanks in advance

More about : nam

Anonymous
November 7, 2004 6:49:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Steven L. Johnson wrote:
> Anyone tried this or have comments on this --

I've done pretty much exactly this but here in the States.

I was on a Local Digital Choice plan. The wife and I
went to the other coast for vacation. Didn't want to
give up the LDC for AC and didn't want to pay
roaming, long distance, etc. The solution was two
FreeUP accounts. Both our phones had dual NAM
capabilities. So the deal I went with was $30 free up
card for each phone (came with additional promo
$30 card each). They waived the activation fees.
Programmed the second NAMs with the free up
numbers. Worked great.

1) Phone needs to support dual NAMs.
2) You can only have one NAM active at a time.
You switch by selecting at a phone menu. The phone
reboots and comes up on selected NAM (actually not
a full reboot but disconnect from service and reconnect
again like it does when you do a *228 to update your
PRL -- needs to do this to re-register your ESN with
the network under a different account). Each NAM can
have a different PRL. The inactive NAM is treated as if
your phone is turned off.

The phone numbers, PRL, and associated programming
are completely independent of each other. Like having
two separate phones with shared address/phone book
etc.

-Quick
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 1:49:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Steven L. Johnson <me@privacy.net> wrote in message news:<1rcqo0l6um484i0ouhgpq6glt374crqcqg@4ax.com>...
> Anyone tried this or have comments on this --
>
> I have an account in the US with CDMA and Analog; works great here --
> I also have an office in the Dominican Republic. We went to Verizon
> since the phone was to work seamlessly between the two countries (
> CDMA only )
>
> Check the web site -- says "can send /receive calls in DR " -- I don't
> receive calls from the US when I'm in DR, but believe I can receive
> calls initiated in DR. I can't call DR when I'm in the States -- but
> I can call a DR number when I am in DR.
>
> I can call the States from DR fine -- it falls under roaming charges.
>
> Some of the people there are telling me that the thing to do is to get
> a second NAM for use in DR and "buy a card" with minutes -- that way,
> when I'm in DR I can change the NAM and have a local number.
>
> It's a business account and I'm trying to keep things somewhat
> uncomplicated and easily accounted for.
>
> Anyone ever try this or have comments on it -- local reps in both
> countries are more familar with "simple setups"
>
> Thanks in advance

I'll take a stab at the problem.
First, any direct calling is likely to be very expensive using VZW as
opposed to a calling card. Check rates, you may find that an programed
calling card sequence is the best bet. Then you can call anywhere in
the world, Verizon international dialing enabled and associated risks
are not an issue.

You need to call VZW and have international dialing enalbed to call
DR.

The second NAM is exactly for that kind of use. Problem is, if you can
find a local cell shop in DR to give you a local number. Sometimes
there are tight restrictions on activating "foriegn ESN" phones, like
in Australia.
I doubt the DR is so restrictive, you'll just have to try.

Remember only one phone number will be active at a time. There are
some workarounds like busy call forwarding and third party swiching
solutions.
Stuart Friedman is sort of an expert in alt.cellular on international
calling. Might want to google that. No DR specific advice I can ever
remember.

I bet there is some DR specific newsgroup where telecom and phone
home/travel strategies are discussed and well known.

Either a prepaid or monthly local plan could be available in the DR if
same technology is used...

-
David
Related resources
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 12:45:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

"Quick" <quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1099871618.804171@sj-nntpcache-3...
> The phone numbers, PRL, and associated programming
> are completely independent of each other. Like having
> two separate phones with shared address/phone book
> etc.

How do you update the PRL's if you have different numbers in each NAM?

I thought *228 only worked if the phone was only associated with one acount?
Can you still do an over the air PRL update?

Do you manually do the programming and then do *228 option 2 just for the
PRL?

-Eric
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 9:52:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Eric Rosenberry wrote:
> "Quick" <quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:1099871618.804171@sj-nntpcache-3...
>> The phone numbers, PRL, and associated programming
>> are completely independent of each other. Like having
>> two separate phones with shared address/phone book
>> etc.
>
> How do you update the PRL's if you have different numbers in each NAM?
>
> I thought *228 only worked if the phone was only associated with one
> acount? Can you still do an over the air PRL update?
>
> Do you manually do the programming and then do *228 option 2 just for
> the PRL?


Your phone will only be associated with one account at a time. When
you switch NAMs the phone section re-initializes and re-registers with
the network. I believe the algorithm is to check your account and then,
within account type, download the correct PRL for the phone.

Lets assume account 1 is a Local Digital Choice plan
and account 2 is an Amrericas Choice plan.
Lets also assume that the PRL/ERI differs for those two accounts.
You activate NAM 1 on your phone.
When you do a *228 the network will check and identify the account
as a LDC plan then determines if the phone supports an ERI or not
from the ESN. The correct PRL and possibly ERI will be downloaded.
When you activate NAM 2 on the phone it is then associated with
your AC plan. Do the same steps above for *228.
If the phone supports dual NAMs then it supports independent PRLs
for each NAM.

I could be wrong,
-Quick
Anonymous
November 10, 2004 10:04:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Quick wrote:
> Eric Rosenberry wrote:
>> "Quick" <quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:1099871618.804171@sj-nntpcache-3...
>>> The phone numbers, PRL, and associated programming
>>> are completely independent of each other. Like having
>>> two separate phones with shared address/phone book
>>> etc.
>>
>> How do you update the PRL's if you have different numbers in each
>> NAM? I thought *228 only worked if the phone was only associated with one
>> acount? Can you still do an over the air PRL update?
>>
>> Do you manually do the programming and then do *228 option 2 just for
>> the PRL?
>
>
> Your phone will only be associated with one account at a time. When
> you switch NAMs the phone section re-initializes and re-registers with
> the network. I believe the algorithm is to check your account and
> then, within account type, download the correct PRL for the phone.
>
> Lets assume account 1 is a Local Digital Choice plan
> and account 2 is an Amrericas Choice plan.
> Lets also assume that the PRL/ERI differs for those two accounts.
> You activate NAM 1 on your phone.
> When you do a *228 the network will check and identify the account
> as a LDC plan then determines if the phone supports an ERI or not
> from the ESN. The correct PRL and possibly ERI will be downloaded.
> When you activate NAM 2 on the phone it is then associated with
> your AC plan. Do the same steps above for *228.
> If the phone supports dual NAMs then it supports independent PRLs
> for each NAM.
>
> I could be wrong,
> -Quick

Whoops. No. I don't think you can do *228 option #1.
Option #1 will download the phone number and associated configuration
based on your ESN.
If you have 2 accounts I don't know what would happen. I suppose the
network would always pick one of the accounts to download? You should
(at least I did) configure all the stuff (except the PRL) manually (or have
it done).
You can do PRL updates as I described above.

-Quick
Anonymous
November 11, 2004 2:25:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

"Quick" <Quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message news:<K3jkd.19734$6q2.10328@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com>...
> Quick wrote:
> > Eric Rosenberry wrote:
> >> "Quick" <quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
> >> news:1099871618.804171@sj-nntpcache-3...
> >>> The phone numbers, PRL, and associated programming
> >>> are completely independent of each other. Like having
> >>> two separate phones with shared address/phone book
> >>> etc.
> >>
> >> How do you update the PRL's if you have different numbers in each
> >> NAM? I thought *228 only worked if the phone was only associated with one
> >> acount? Can you still do an over the air PRL update?
> >>
> >> Do you manually do the programming and then do *228 option 2 just for
> >> the PRL?
> >
> >
> > Your phone will only be associated with one account at a time. When
> > you switch NAMs the phone section re-initializes and re-registers with
> > the network. I believe the algorithm is to check your account and
> > then, within account type, download the correct PRL for the phone.
> >
> > Lets assume account 1 is a Local Digital Choice plan
> > and account 2 is an Amrericas Choice plan.
> > Lets also assume that the PRL/ERI differs for those two accounts.
> > You activate NAM 1 on your phone.
> > When you do a *228 the network will check and identify the account
> > as a LDC plan then determines if the phone supports an ERI or not
> > from the ESN. The correct PRL and possibly ERI will be downloaded.
> > When you activate NAM 2 on the phone it is then associated with
> > your AC plan. Do the same steps above for *228.
> > If the phone supports dual NAMs then it supports independent PRLs
> > for each NAM.
> >
> > I could be wrong,
> > -Quick
>
> Whoops. No. I don't think you can do *228 option #1.
> Option #1 will download the phone number and associated configuration
> based on your ESN.
> If you have 2 accounts I don't know what would happen. I suppose the
> network would always pick one of the accounts to download? You should
> (at least I did) configure all the stuff (except the PRL) manually (or have
> it done).
> You can do PRL updates as I described above.
>
> -Quick

AFAIK, in markets that have "authentication", this security feature
needs to be turned off.
It's and advanced software security feature/suite, that prevents fraud
through some sophisticated comparisons. Also prevents two, exactly
programmed ESN's and phone numbers to NOT work, even in the same
phone.

With authentication off, you will have the equivalent of two phones
with the same ESN and different phone numbers.

VZW doesn't like to turn this off and often will claim they can't, but
a tech support with a higher skill'security level and a bonafide
reason to turn it off, like two active NAMs, should be able to,
despite protests.
Get this done with a higher level tech support person and get ready to
face a big hassle in "authentication" markets and lower level CS who
don't know how it works.

-
David
Anonymous
November 11, 2004 3:54:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

On 7 Nov 2004 22:49:55 -0800, davidlind@my-deja.com (David L) wrote:

>Steven L. Johnson <me@privacy.net> wrote in message news:<1rcqo0l6um484i0ouhgpq6glt374crqcqg@4ax.com>...
>> Anyone tried this or have comments on this --
>>
>> I have an account in the US with CDMA and Analog; works great here --
>> I also have an office in the Dominican Republic. We went to Verizon
>> since the phone was to work seamlessly between the two countries (
>> CDMA only )


A lot of good suggestions -- some clarifications and report of what
done to date:

1) Ideal thing is for one phone number that can be received
seamlessly in the States and the US.

Cost is somewhat a consideration -- but our primary consideration is
that we want a simple solution for our customers.

The intention is to provide our customers one phone number for them to
find me -- I'm responsible for service and we want our customers not
to have to figure out where I am at and be able to dial once

When I make most of my calls from the Dominican Republic -- I use the
regular phone in the plant.


2) Called Verizon customer service while in DR -- they have opened up
a case ( or whatever they call it ) ; the point is the web site is
clearly written "send and receive" -- I'm supposed to have someone
call me within 24 hours ; we'll see

The 2nd NAM is probably the next best option -- but then the customer
might need to make two calls ; we would prefer them not having to
go through that extra step.

I'll let you know -- my experience so far is that Verizon has slowly
been trying to work through this. My situation first was no service
-- now I can call out of DR; I can call local numbers in DR when I'm
here ; but I am blocked from calling the DR office when I am in the
States. Customer service noted that DR is blocked totally with the
Verizon system in the US -- that's the next hurdle I need to overcome
after the current problem is resolved.
Anonymous
November 11, 2004 3:54:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Steven L. Johnson wrote:
> On 7 Nov 2004 22:49:55 -0800, davidlind@my-deja.com (David L) wrote:
>
>> Steven L. Johnson <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
>> news:<1rcqo0l6um484i0ouhgpq6glt374crqcqg@4ax.com>...
>>> Anyone tried this or have comments on this --
>>>
>>> I have an account in the US with CDMA and Analog; works great here
>>> -- I also have an office in the Dominican Republic. We went to
>>> Verizon since the phone was to work seamlessly between the two
>>> countries ( CDMA only )
>
>
> A lot of good suggestions -- some clarifications and report of what
> done to date:
>
> 1) Ideal thing is for one phone number that can be received
> seamlessly in the States and the US.
>
> Cost is somewhat a consideration -- but our primary consideration is
> that we want a simple solution for our customers.
>
> The intention is to provide our customers one phone number for them to
> find me -- I'm responsible for service and we want our customers not
> to have to figure out where I am at and be able to dial once
>
> When I make most of my calls from the Dominican Republic -- I use the
> regular phone in the plant.
>
>
> 2) Called Verizon customer service while in DR -- they have opened up
> a case ( or whatever they call it ) ; the point is the web site is
> clearly written "send and receive" -- I'm supposed to have someone
> call me within 24 hours ; we'll see
>
> The 2nd NAM is probably the next best option -- but then the customer
> might need to make two calls ; we would prefer them not having to
> go through that extra step.
>
> I'll let you know -- my experience so far is that Verizon has slowly
> been trying to work through this. My situation first was no service
> -- now I can call out of DR; I can call local numbers in DR when I'm
> here ; but I am blocked from calling the DR office when I am in the
> States. Customer service noted that DR is blocked totally with the
> Verizon system in the US -- that's the next hurdle I need to overcome
> after the current problem is resolved.

Second NAM for local # in DR.

While in DR forward main # to second NAM # so customers
only have 1 number to reach you. You are able to make "local"
calls in DR from second NAM #. You would still have to check
VM manually for missed calls on main # (no notification).

-Quick
Anonymous
November 12, 2004 3:36:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Steven L. Johnson <me@privacy.net> wrote in message news:<6b97p0te81ij6qsp26fl0f0fvbc6b9fu5e@4ax.com>...
> On 7 Nov 2004 22:49:55 -0800, davidlind@my-deja.com (David L) wrote:
>
> >Steven L. Johnson <me@privacy.net> wrote in message news:<1rcqo0l6um484i0ouhgpq6glt374crqcqg@4ax.com>...
> >> Anyone tried this or have comments on this --
> >>
> >> I have an account in the US with CDMA and Analog; works great here --
> >> I also have an office in the Dominican Republic. We went to Verizon
> >> since the phone was to work seamlessly between the two countries (
> >> CDMA only )
>
>
> A lot of good suggestions -- some clarifications and report of what
> done to date:
>
> 1) Ideal thing is for one phone number that can be received
> seamlessly in the States and the US.
>
> Cost is somewhat a consideration -- but our primary consideration is
> that we want a simple solution for our customers.
>
> The intention is to provide our customers one phone number for them to
> find me -- I'm responsible for service and we want our customers not
> to have to figure out where I am at and be able to dial once
>
>

I can't explain the mechanics, I'm a little rusty on telco, but did
you look at an 800# pointed toward your cell phone?
Forgot the name of the companies, but they offer web based redirection
of an 800# to whatever destination number chosen. Customers have one
toll free number. You direct where it's pointed.

-
David
Anonymous
November 12, 2004 11:12:28 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

On 12 Nov 2004 00:36:29 -0800, davidlind@my-deja.com (David L) wrote:

>Forgot the name of the companies, but they offer web based redirection
>of an 800# to whatever destination number chosen. Customers have one
>toll free number. You direct where it's pointed.

www.kall8.com
www.telcan.net

-SC
--
Stanley Cline -- sc1 at roamer1 dot org -- http://www.roamer1.org/
....
"Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today. There might
be a law against it by that time." -/usr/games/fortune
Anonymous
November 15, 2004 3:36:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 11:09:38 -0800, "Quick"
<quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote:


>Second NAM for local # in DR.
>
>While in DR forward main # to second NAM # so customers
>only have 1 number to reach you. You are able to make "local"
>calls in DR from second NAM #. You would still have to check
>VM manually for missed calls on main # (no notification).
>

That would be a simple workaround -- HOWEVER; at this point what I
am told by Verizon customer service and my own experience; I can't
dial DR direct when I'm in the States; I would imagine the results
would be the same when trying to forward.

The US Verizon network is blocked from making calls to DR according to
the one customer service person I talked to about it. Last time I
checked the Dominican Republic was NOT one of the foreign countries
listed on the Verizon Wireless website that will give you rates if you
have the international calling option ( which I do )

An update from an earlier posting -- I was supposed to get a call on
Friday to update me on progress. As of this minute ( Monday ; 15
November ) I've not had any calls from Verizon.
Anonymous
November 15, 2004 3:45:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 08:12:28 -0500, Stanley Cline
<sc1-news@roamer1.org> wrote:

>On 12 Nov 2004 00:36:29 -0800, davidlind@my-deja.com (David L) wrote:
>
>>Forgot the name of the companies, but they offer web based redirection
>>of an 800# to whatever destination number chosen. Customers have one
>>toll free number. You direct where it's pointed.
>
>www.kall8.com
>www.telcan.net
>
>-SC

This is a workaround -- I can take my US number, route it to the 800
number -- then have the 800 number route to the 2nd NAM in DR; I
could just activate it when I need it -- then when in the States, the
normal activity works.

Something to also look at -- when I'm in the States, I can set the
service up with the plant in DR; gives me a work around to being
blocked by Verizon Wireless calling to DR -- I can call the 800 number
in the US and have it redirected to the DR office

Obviously -- prefer the "clean way" -- but I've got a Plan B that
will get what I'm after

Gotta love USENET -- thanks
Anonymous
December 12, 2004 11:33:30 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

On Sat, 06 Nov 2004 15:32:36 -0500, Steven L. Johnson <me@privacy.net>
wrote:

This is a follow-up based upon some of the things I've done:

>Anyone tried this or have comments on this --
>
>I have an account in the US with CDMA and Analog; works great here --
>I also have an office in the Dominican Republic. We went to Verizon
>since the phone was to work seamlessly between the two countries (
>CDMA only )
>
>Check the web site -- says "can send /receive calls in DR " -- I don't
>receive calls from the US when I'm in DR, but believe I can receive
>calls initiated in DR. I can't call DR when I'm in the States -- but
>I can call a DR number when I am in DR.

Finally talked to a US customer "service" person in the technical
department; bottom line -- ANY call to the Dominican Republic is
blocked from the U.S. He "helpfully" refered me to the fine print
further down in the web page from the bold font that I quoted above --
that says "service availability is subject to change without notice".

I never had the service ever working -- but apparently that's the way
it is.

Looks like the only thing I can do for our customers is forward to my
U.S. number to an 800 number that will redirect to a local number in
the Dominican Republic I can be reached at -- either a second NAM on
my cell phone or get a phone with pre-paid minutes in DR.

I discussed the second NAM with the representative -- he was totally
unaware of anything to do with the Dominican service; the company in
DR uses the Verizon logos and for all appearances is Verizon.

Haven't been all that impressed with this -- bottom line; the
service that was clearly advertised by the salesman and the web site
never worked ; the ability to "make and recieve" calls in DR was why I
switched to begin with.

I have a work around -- I probably won't drop Verizon for now ; I
may end up snagging a Puerto Rican account -- these work like I need
it to.

Thanks again for all the help -- I now

(a) have a work around and
(b) have a better understanding of what not to expect out of Verizon

Have a happy holiday --
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 11:38:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

OK -- somewhat bad form; reply to my own posting and top post -- but
this is a short note , the quoted post gives background

-- Traveling this week and had to call the office in DR; had an
internet connection and set up and account with www.telcan.net;

within a few hours activated and on my way -- from the little I've
used it I've got to give it good recommendations; I call a US 800
style number and it is directed to our plant in DR

There were two of these services recommended -- I went with telcan
because their web site didn't have a bunch of flash junk that I had to
install.

Next step is to pick up a phone in DR and then forward my US phone and
do a two stage redirect ; forward the Verizon phone to the 800 number,
then the 800 number to the DR cell phone -- then our customers will
have a seamless connection regardless of where I'm at.

Feliz Navidad --


On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 08:33:30 -0500, Steven L. Johnson <me@privacy.net>
wrote:



>On Sat, 06 Nov 2004 15:32:36 -0500, Steven L. Johnson <me@privacy.net>
>wrote:
>
>This is a follow-up based upon some of the things I've done:
>
>>Anyone tried this or have comments on this --
>>
>>I have an account in the US with CDMA and Analog; works great here --
>>I also have an office in the Dominican Republic. We went to Verizon
>>since the phone was to work seamlessly between the two countries (
>>CDMA only )
>>
>>Check the web site -- says "can send /receive calls in DR " -- I don't
>>receive calls from the US when I'm in DR, but believe I can receive
>>calls initiated in DR. I can't call DR when I'm in the States -- but
>>I can call a DR number when I am in DR.
>
>Finally talked to a US customer "service" person in the technical
>department; bottom line -- ANY call to the Dominican Republic is
>blocked from the U.S. He "helpfully" refered me to the fine print
>further down in the web page from the bold font that I quoted above --
>that says "service availability is subject to change without notice".
>
>I never had the service ever working -- but apparently that's the way
>it is.
>
>Looks like the only thing I can do for our customers is forward to my
>U.S. number to an 800 number that will redirect to a local number in
>the Dominican Republic I can be reached at -- either a second NAM on
>my cell phone or get a phone with pre-paid minutes in DR.
!