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Starting Morrowind

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Anonymous
November 12, 2004 3:32:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.elder-scrolls (More info?)

Picked up the GOY edition of Morrowind, which comes with Tribunal and
Bloodmoon, yesterday, and started playing around with it.

So far I've started two characters, both adventurers, because it looks
to me on the surface that the various classes are all oddly built, and I
can do better.

That seems funny, since I hardly know how the game works at all... but
for example, taking both Medium and Heavy armor as major skills seems...
silly. Even without leaving the first town I could easily get enough
cash together to put Heavy armor everywhere but on my feet and arms...
and the latter two only because there literally wasn't any for sale.
This suggests to me that the only reason to prefer medium to heavy is
for the weight. Well, if weight is an issue I'd think I'd always prefer
medium, and if it isn't an issue I'd think I'd always prefer Heavy.
Skill in both seems like a waste either way.

Or take my melee oriented orc; none of the classes major in axe, but
orcs get an advantage with the axe, it seems silly to throw that away.

SO, first question I have is, are there advantages I'm not seeing to
taking the package deals instead of making my own class up?

My first character concentrated on magic... but I wasn't clear on how to
actually use magic in a fight, so he pretty much relied on his blunt
instrument (a silver staff), and his lack of combat focus and poor
health and so on meant he didn't last too long in a real fight. I
figure I'll go back and play him a bit more once I get more of the game
figured out; my Orc actually managed to cast spells so now I have an
idea what I was doing wrong.

Leveling up. How does this work, really? I've killed quite a few
creatures but can't find any advancement going on; I did however manage
to get a couple skill ups, in Athletics (lots of jumping as I wander
around) and Mercantile (constantly trying to sell a little lower and buy
a little higher than the offered price). I can see with each skill the
progress towards a skill up, but I don't see any progress at all on
leveling up. Where does such progress come from, if not from killing
bad guys or doing quests or... well, ok, I haven't checked it since
doing anything but kill a few mud crab things, maybe its going up and I
haven't noticed.

Is there any way, other than experience, to tell how difficult something
is going to be before I try it? I've been up against some things that
are outlandishly easy, and others that kill me before I've done even a
tenth of their bar in damage.

Its dark out at night. Best plan to deal with this just to sleep till
daylight? Or is there some sort of magic or potion that will take care
of the problem, once I'm far enough along the way to get it.

Potions and spells lasting 7 seconds, 10 seconds... seem pretty
pointless. By the time I've activated them and started a fight or
something, they are about to wear off... is that right? Or does the
duration really mean till a chance of wearing off, or something, and the
average duration is really much longer? Or is it just that these are
very low level potions and spells, and as I get more experienced I'll
have stuff that lasts long enough to be worth using?

In general, I'm overwhelmed by the amount of stuff there is to learn;
thats fine, I'm playing around a bit, then I'll actually try and study
up once I have some basis for what I'm reading about. Looking thru the
manual the first time, I really couldn't get a handle on what I was
looking at.

Hmmm, here's a question. I installed all three discs, was that a
mistake? Should I have installed just Morrowind, played that, and only
then tribunal, and only after finishing that installed Bloodmoon?
Probably not, but it seemed someone earlier on this newsgroup was
suggesting something along those lines.

Is there a multiplayer version of this, where I can get together with
some friends to play in a group?

Plenty more questions later, as I think of them.

Lance

More about : starting morrowind

Anonymous
November 13, 2004 8:46:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.elder-scrolls (More info?)

In article <2_udnRAp3JIzbgncRVn-jg@dejazzd.com>,
Lance Berg <emporer@dejazzd.com> wrote:

> That seems funny, since I hardly know how the game works at all... but
> for example, taking both Medium and Heavy armor as major skills seems...
> silly.

It depends on what kind of armor you find.

But in this case, you're right. There is little reason to wear medium
armor, and very little high-quality medium armor in the game.

Also, different skills are linked to different physical
attributes. When you raise a skill through experience, you'll get the
chance to improve the corresponding attribute when you level up.

> This suggests to me that the only reason to prefer medium to heavy is
> for the weight. Well, if weight is an issue I'd think I'd always prefer
> medium

It is an issue, even late in the game when you are super strong.

> SO, first question I have is, are there advantages I'm not seeing to
> taking the package deals instead of making my own class up?

No.

> Leveling up. How does this work, really?

When you use a skill, it goes up a fraction of a point.

When you accumulate 10 points of increases in your Major or Minor
skill sets, you gain a level. You can get increases in other
non-Major/Minor skills, but they do not contribute to the 10 points
you need to level up.

When you level up, you are asked to pick three attributes you want to
improve. The attributes that govern the skills you learned will have a
multiplier; the multiplier goes up according to the amount of skill
increase associated with that attribute, up to x5. To gain a x5
multiplier you must gain a full 10 points in skills governed by that
attribute.

> I've killed quite a few
> creatures but can't find any advancement going on; I did however manage

It's going on, but the first 4-7 levels are painfully slow. It picks
up after that.

> Is there any way, other than experience, to tell how difficult something
> is going to be before I try it?

If it looks like it could kick your ass, it probably will.

> Its dark out at night. Best plan to deal with this just to sleep till
> daylight? Or is there some sort of magic or potion that will take care
> of the problem, once I'm far enough along the way to get it.

Yes. And torches and lamps, of course, but they burn out quickly.

> Potions and spells lasting 7 seconds, 10 seconds... seem pretty
> pointless. By the time I've activated them and started a fight or

I'll let the spellcasters answer that. I will say that there is a
general consensus that cast magic is underpowered, but it can
certainly pull your bacon out of the fire at an opportune moment.

> Hmmm, here's a question. I installed all three discs, was that a
> mistake? Should I have installed just Morrowind, played that, and only

Install them all, then apply the final Bloodmoon patch.

> Is there a multiplayer version of this, where I can get together with
> some friends to play in a group?

No.

Rick R.
Anonymous
November 13, 2004 11:11:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.elder-scrolls (More info?)

On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 12:32:29 -0500, Lance Berg <emporer@dejazzd.com>
wrote:

>Picked up the GOY edition of Morrowind, which comes with Tribunal and
>Bloodmoon, yesterday, and started playing around with it.
>
>So far I've started two characters, both adventurers, because it looks
>to me on the surface that the various classes are all oddly built, and I
>can do better.
>
>That seems funny, since I hardly know how the game works at all... but
>for example, taking both Medium and Heavy armor as major skills seems...
>silly. Even without leaving the first town I could easily get enough
>cash together to put Heavy armor everywhere but on my feet and arms...
>and the latter two only because there literally wasn't any for sale.
>This suggests to me that the only reason to prefer medium to heavy is
>for the weight. Well, if weight is an issue I'd think I'd always prefer
>medium, and if it isn't an issue I'd think I'd always prefer Heavy.
>Skill in both seems like a waste either way.

The main reason for having both skills is that it makes it easier to get
a high Endurance stat early in the game, which will result in a higher
Health than you could get otherwise.

>Or take my melee oriented orc; none of the classes major in axe, but
>orcs get an advantage with the axe, it seems silly to throw that away.
>
>SO, first question I have is, are there advantages I'm not seeing to
>taking the package deals instead of making my own class up?

Most of them are fairly focused, but it's quite manageable to just make
your own classes - just work out what you want to focus on to start
with.

>My first character concentrated on magic... but I wasn't clear on how to
>actually use magic in a fight, so he pretty much relied on his blunt
>instrument (a silver staff), and his lack of combat focus and poor
>health and so on meant he didn't last too long in a real fight. I
>figure I'll go back and play him a bit more once I get more of the game
>figured out; my Orc actually managed to cast spells so now I have an
>idea what I was doing wrong.

A magic-user who wishes to also use melee is best paid to use a lot of
Conjuration - the Bound item spells are invaluable in the early game.

>Leveling up. How does this work, really? I've killed quite a few
>creatures but can't find any advancement going on; I did however manage
>to get a couple skill ups, in Athletics (lots of jumping as I wander
>around) and Mercantile (constantly trying to sell a little lower and buy
>a little higher than the offered price). I can see with each skill the
>progress towards a skill up, but I don't see any progress at all on
>leveling up. Where does such progress come from, if not from killing
>bad guys or doing quests or... well, ok, I haven't checked it since
>doing anything but kill a few mud crab things, maybe its going up and I
>haven't noticed.

When you have 10 skill-ups in your major/minor skills, the next time you
rest you will rise a level and get a chance to increase your stats. The
stats that you can increase depend on which skills rose during that
level.

>Is there any way, other than experience, to tell how difficult something
>is going to be before I try it? I've been up against some things that
>are outlandishly easy, and others that kill me before I've done even a
>tenth of their bar in damage.

Nope, experience is the only teacher.

>Its dark out at night. Best plan to deal with this just to sleep till
>daylight? Or is there some sort of magic or potion that will take care
>of the problem, once I'm far enough along the way to get it.

Night Eye spells are the best way to deal with this.

>Potions and spells lasting 7 seconds, 10 seconds... seem pretty
>pointless. By the time I've activated them and started a fight or
>something, they are about to wear off... is that right? Or does the
>duration really mean till a chance of wearing off, or something, and the
>average duration is really much longer? Or is it just that these are
>very low level potions and spells, and as I get more experienced I'll
>have stuff that lasts long enough to be worth using?

Those are lower level potions, and eventually you can make much better
ones, but they aren't pointless. In many cases they can make a big
difference, since you can go to your inventory and use them in the
middle of a fight.

>Hmmm, here's a question. I installed all three discs, was that a
>mistake? Should I have installed just Morrowind, played that, and only
>then tribunal, and only after finishing that installed Bloodmoon?
>Probably not, but it seemed someone earlier on this newsgroup was
>suggesting something along those lines.

They should all be installed at once, or you'll lose out on some
patches. However, you might want to deselect the Tribunal addon from the
'Data Files' Screen until you're comfortable with the idea of being
attacked by assassins when you rest (Note that I don't think this
happens until you're level 5).

>Is there a multiplayer version of this, where I can get together with
>some friends to play in a group?

No multiplayer.
Related resources
Anonymous
November 13, 2004 11:11:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.elder-scrolls (More info?)

Greg Johnson wrote:

> On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 12:32:29 -0500, Lance Berg <emporer@dejazzd.com>
> wrote:
>
>
>>Picked up the GOY edition of Morrowind, which comes with Tribunal and
>>Bloodmoon, yesterday, and started playing around with it.
>>
>>So far I've started two characters, both adventurers, because it looks
>>to me on the surface that the various classes are all oddly built, and I
>>can do better.
>>
>>That seems funny, since I hardly know how the game works at all... but
>>for example, taking both Medium and Heavy armor as major skills seems...
>>silly. Even without leaving the first town I could easily get enough
>>cash together to put Heavy armor everywhere but on my feet and arms...
>>and the latter two only because there literally wasn't any for sale.
>>This suggests to me that the only reason to prefer medium to heavy is
>>for the weight. Well, if weight is an issue I'd think I'd always prefer
>>medium, and if it isn't an issue I'd think I'd always prefer Heavy.
>>Skill in both seems like a waste either way.
>
>
> The main reason for having both skills is that it makes it easier to get
> a high Endurance stat early in the game, which will result in a higher
> Health than you could get otherwise.
>
>
>>Or take my melee oriented orc; none of the classes major in axe, but
>>orcs get an advantage with the axe, it seems silly to throw that away.
>>
>>SO, first question I have is, are there advantages I'm not seeing to
>>taking the package deals instead of making my own class up?
>
>
> Most of them are fairly focused, but it's quite manageable to just make
> your own classes - just work out what you want to focus on to start
> with.
>
>
>>My first character concentrated on magic... but I wasn't clear on how to
>>actually use magic in a fight, so he pretty much relied on his blunt
>>instrument (a silver staff), and his lack of combat focus and poor
>>health and so on meant he didn't last too long in a real fight. I
>>figure I'll go back and play him a bit more once I get more of the game
>>figured out; my Orc actually managed to cast spells so now I have an
>>idea what I was doing wrong.
>
>
> A magic-user who wishes to also use melee is best paid to use a lot of
> Conjuration - the Bound item spells are invaluable in the early game.
>
>
>>Leveling up. How does this work, really? I've killed quite a few
>>creatures but can't find any advancement going on; I did however manage
>>to get a couple skill ups, in Athletics (lots of jumping as I wander
>>around) and Mercantile (constantly trying to sell a little lower and buy
>>a little higher than the offered price). I can see with each skill the
>>progress towards a skill up, but I don't see any progress at all on
>>leveling up. Where does such progress come from, if not from killing
>>bad guys or doing quests or... well, ok, I haven't checked it since
>>doing anything but kill a few mud crab things, maybe its going up and I
>>haven't noticed.
>
>
> When you have 10 skill-ups in your major/minor skills, the next time you
> rest you will rise a level and get a chance to increase your stats. The
> stats that you can increase depend on which skills rose during that
> level.
>
>
>>Is there any way, other than experience, to tell how difficult something
>>is going to be before I try it? I've been up against some things that
>>are outlandishly easy, and others that kill me before I've done even a
>>tenth of their bar in damage.
>
>
> Nope, experience is the only teacher.
>
>
>>Its dark out at night. Best plan to deal with this just to sleep till
>>daylight? Or is there some sort of magic or potion that will take care
>>of the problem, once I'm far enough along the way to get it.
>
>
> Night Eye spells are the best way to deal with this.
>
>
>>Potions and spells lasting 7 seconds, 10 seconds... seem pretty
>>pointless. By the time I've activated them and started a fight or
>>something, they are about to wear off... is that right? Or does the
>>duration really mean till a chance of wearing off, or something, and the
>>average duration is really much longer? Or is it just that these are
>>very low level potions and spells, and as I get more experienced I'll
>>have stuff that lasts long enough to be worth using?
>
>
> Those are lower level potions, and eventually you can make much better
> ones, but they aren't pointless. In many cases they can make a big
> difference, since you can go to your inventory and use them in the
> middle of a fight.
>
>
>>Hmmm, here's a question. I installed all three discs, was that a
>>mistake? Should I have installed just Morrowind, played that, and only
>>then tribunal, and only after finishing that installed Bloodmoon?
>>Probably not, but it seemed someone earlier on this newsgroup was
>>suggesting something along those lines.
>
>
> They should all be installed at once, or you'll lose out on some
> patches. However, you might want to deselect the Tribunal addon from the
> 'Data Files' Screen until you're comfortable with the idea of being
> attacked by assassins when you rest (Note that I don't think this
> happens until you're level 5).
>
>
The attacks start at level one. If you can defeat them it is a big
bonus. I found that a first level mage with a frost bite spell had a
better chance than a first level fighter with any sword usually available.


>>Is there a multiplayer version of this, where I can get together with
>>some friends to play in a group?
>
>
> No multiplayer.
Anonymous
November 14, 2004 12:36:30 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.elder-scrolls (More info?)

On Sat, 13 Nov 2004 05:46:13 +0000 (UTC), rickr@is.rice.edu (Rick
Russell) wrote:

>In article <2_udnRAp3JIzbgncRVn-jg@dejazzd.com>,
>Lance Berg <emporer@dejazzd.com> wrote:

>> Potions and spells lasting 7 seconds, 10 seconds... seem pretty
>> pointless. By the time I've activated them and started a fight or
>
>I'll let the spellcasters answer that. I will say that there is a
>general consensus that cast magic is underpowered, but it can
>certainly pull your bacon out of the fire at an opportune moment.
>
I'd tend to disagree with this. Magic is certainly powerful enough, as
soon as you start using the spellmakers. The problem is that when you
use powerful magic, you run out of mana in no time at all. There are 3
ways to cope with this; use powerful spells and make your own mana
potions, use enchanted items rather than spells, or don't rely on magic.
I usually take the first option.
Anonymous
November 14, 2004 1:17:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.elder-scrolls (More info?)

Greg Johnson wrote:
> On Sat, 13 Nov 2004 05:46:13 +0000 (UTC), rickr@is.rice.edu (Rick
> Russell) wrote:
>
>
>>In article <2_udnRAp3JIzbgncRVn-jg@dejazzd.com>,
>>Lance Berg <emporer@dejazzd.com> wrote:
>
>
>>>Potions and spells lasting 7 seconds, 10 seconds... seem pretty
>>>pointless. By the time I've activated them and started a fight or
>>
>>I'll let the spellcasters answer that. I will say that there is a
>>general consensus that cast magic is underpowered, but it can
>>certainly pull your bacon out of the fire at an opportune moment.
>>
>
> I'd tend to disagree with this. Magic is certainly powerful enough, as
> soon as you start using the spellmakers. The problem is that when you
> use powerful magic, you run out of mana in no time at all. There are 3
> ways to cope with this; use powerful spells and make your own mana
> potions, use enchanted items rather than spells, or don't rely on magic.
> I usually take the first option.

There is a robe you get from one of the misc bloodmoon quests, the
"Mantle of Woe", my Magicka increases to 800 when I wear it, but it does
have it's downsides, like sun damage.

~Cameron
November 29, 2004 5:06:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.elder-scrolls (More info?)

"Greg Johnson" <greg.gsj@gmail.com> skrev i en meddelelse
news:r69ap09dea3eo8e357n8ujha8uj7dgqkoc@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 12:32:29 -0500, Lance Berg <emporer@dejazzd.com>
> wrote:
>
> >Picked up the GOY edition of Morrowind, which comes with Tribunal and
> >Bloodmoon, yesterday, and started playing around with it.
> >
> >So far I've started two characters, both adventurers, because it looks
> >to me on the surface that the various classes are all oddly built, and
I
> >can do better.
> >
> >That seems funny, since I hardly know how the game works at all... but
> >for example, taking both Medium and Heavy armor as major skills
seems...
> >silly. Even without leaving the first town I could easily get enough
> >cash together to put Heavy armor everywhere but on my feet and arms...
> >and the latter two only because there literally wasn't any for sale.
> >This suggests to me that the only reason to prefer medium to heavy is
> >for the weight. Well, if weight is an issue I'd think I'd always
prefer
> >medium, and if it isn't an issue I'd think I'd always prefer Heavy.
> >Skill in both seems like a waste either way.
>
> The main reason for having both skills is that it makes it easier to get
> a high Endurance stat early in the game, which will result in a higher
> Health than you could get otherwise.
>
> >Or take my melee oriented orc; none of the classes major in axe, but
> >orcs get an advantage with the axe, it seems silly to throw that away.
> >
> >SO, first question I have is, are there advantages I'm not seeing to
> >taking the package deals instead of making my own class up?
>
> Most of them are fairly focused, but it's quite manageable to just make
> your own classes - just work out what you want to focus on to start
> with.
>
> >My first character concentrated on magic... but I wasn't clear on how
to
> >actually use magic in a fight, so he pretty much relied on his blunt
> >instrument (a silver staff), and his lack of combat focus and poor
> >health and so on meant he didn't last too long in a real fight. I
> >figure I'll go back and play him a bit more once I get more of the game
> >figured out; my Orc actually managed to cast spells so now I have an
> >idea what I was doing wrong.
>
> A magic-user who wishes to also use melee is best paid to use a lot of
> Conjuration - the Bound item spells are invaluable in the early game.
>
> >Leveling up. How does this work, really? I've killed quite a few
> >creatures but can't find any advancement going on; I did however manage
> >to get a couple skill ups, in Athletics (lots of jumping as I wander
> >around) and Mercantile (constantly trying to sell a little lower and
buy
> >a little higher than the offered price). I can see with each skill the
> >progress towards a skill up, but I don't see any progress at all on
> >leveling up. Where does such progress come from, if not from killing
> >bad guys or doing quests or... well, ok, I haven't checked it since
> >doing anything but kill a few mud crab things, maybe its going up and I
> >haven't noticed.
>
> When you have 10 skill-ups in your major/minor skills, the next time you
> rest you will rise a level and get a chance to increase your stats. The
> stats that you can increase depend on which skills rose during that
> level.
>
> >Is there any way, other than experience, to tell how difficult
something
> >is going to be before I try it? I've been up against some things that
> >are outlandishly easy, and others that kill me before I've done even a
> >tenth of their bar in damage.
>
> Nope, experience is the only teacher.
>
> >Its dark out at night. Best plan to deal with this just to sleep till
> >daylight? Or is there some sort of magic or potion that will take care
> >of the problem, once I'm far enough along the way to get it.
>
> Night Eye spells are the best way to deal with this.
>
> >Potions and spells lasting 7 seconds, 10 seconds... seem pretty
> >pointless. By the time I've activated them and started a fight or
> >something, they are about to wear off... is that right? Or does the
> >duration really mean till a chance of wearing off, or something, and
the
> >average duration is really much longer? Or is it just that these are
> >very low level potions and spells, and as I get more experienced I'll
> >have stuff that lasts long enough to be worth using?
>
> Those are lower level potions, and eventually you can make much better
> ones, but they aren't pointless. In many cases they can make a big
> difference, since you can go to your inventory and use them in the
> middle of a fight.
>
> >Hmmm, here's a question. I installed all three discs, was that a
> >mistake? Should I have installed just Morrowind, played that, and only
> >then tribunal, and only after finishing that installed Bloodmoon?
> >Probably not, but it seemed someone earlier on this newsgroup was
> >suggesting something along those lines.
>
> They should all be installed at once, or you'll lose out on some
> patches. However, you might want to deselect the Tribunal addon from the
> 'Data Files' Screen until you're comfortable with the idea of being
> attacked by assassins when you rest (Note that I don't think this
> happens until you're level 5).
>
> >Is there a multiplayer version of this, where I can get together with
> >some friends to play in a group?
>
> No multiplayer.

the assassins attack you from the start no matter what level - if tribunal
is activated.
Even if you use the sleeping mat in the census and exise office before you
have
given your release papers to the officer in the front room. They are,
however, always
matched to your own level, and their weapons are simple and crude in the
beginning.

I would recommend follow the advice, given by many, not to disable
tribunal, and
not to speak to the officer in ebonheart which will stop them from coming.
Theý are
useful for combat practise, and their armor is light and valuable - a
good source for
cash

merlin
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 5:06:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.elder-scrolls (More info?)

Merlin wrote:
> I would recommend follow the advice, given by many, not to disable
> tribunal, and
> not to speak to the officer in ebonheart which will stop them from coming.
> Theý are
> useful for combat practise, and their armor is light and valuable - a
> good source for
> cash
>
> merlin

If they're causing you real grief, install the DMAttacks mod which stops
them appearing, and just de-activate the mod when you're ready for them.
This works pretty well as, as Merlin says, the assassins level according
to your char level so if you don't turn them on until you're 30th level
or whatever you're in for a big fight!
November 29, 2004 11:17:17 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.elder-scrolls (More info?)

"Merlin" <bech_dokNOSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote in
news:41ab1eed$0$20514$edfadb0f@dread15.news.tele.dk:

> the assassins attack you from the start no matter what level - if
> tribunal
> is activated.
> Even if you use the sleeping mat in the census and exise office
> before you
> have
> given your release papers to the officer in the front room. They
> are,
> however, always
> matched to your own level, and their weapons are simple and crude
> in the
> beginning.

In my game, the sleeping mat is the only place that is exempt from
assassin attacks (the script used to spawn assassins specifically exempts
that cell from attacks). It is possible this was a change introduced in
Bloodmoon, or in a patch however.
Anonymous
December 1, 2004 5:52:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.elder-scrolls (More info?)

Greg Johnson <greg.gsj@gmail.com> wrote in message news:<4oobp0hvtqoa3084em31ndeft3501mbr3k@4ax.com>...
> On Sat, 13 Nov 2004 05:46:13 +0000 (UTC), rickr@is.rice.edu (Rick
> Russell) wrote:
>
> >In article <2_udnRAp3JIzbgncRVn-jg@dejazzd.com>,
> >Lance Berg <emporer@dejazzd.com> wrote:
>
> >> Potions and spells lasting 7 seconds, 10 seconds... seem pretty
> >> pointless. By the time I've activated them and started a fight or
> >
> >I'll let the spellcasters answer that. I will say that there is a
> >general consensus that cast magic is underpowered, but it can
> >certainly pull your bacon out of the fire at an opportune moment.
> >
> I'd tend to disagree with this. Magic is certainly powerful enough, as
> soon as you start using the spellmakers. The problem is that when you
> use powerful magic, you run out of mana in no time at all. There are 3
> ways to cope with this; use powerful spells and make your own mana
> potions, use enchanted items rather than spells, or don't rely on magic.
> I usually take the first option.


I find alchemy helps a lot. A high level fortify intelligence plus a
high restore magika really boosts your spell casting ability.
!