HP inkjets for homemade business cards using Word->FM temp..

Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

I would like to make up calling cards at home using 8.5x11 sheets of
Avery precut cards. Templates are provided for Word & Word Perfect.

1. How well do people find the translation of the templates to
Framemaker? Is the positioning of the business cards correctly
preserved?

2. I'm using an HP inkjet to print (PSC 750). I haven't calibrated
the print heads because it requires that all the color cartridges be
working. I haven't replaced the depleted color cartridges because I
don't expect to use them. Does anyone have experience with how accurate
is the positioning of the printout without this calibration? This is
more critical when printing out on precut cards than when printing out
normally.
49 answers Last reply
More about inkjets homemade business cards word temp
  1. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote:
    > I would like to make up calling cards at home using 8.5x11 sheets of
    > Avery precut cards. Templates are provided for Word & Word Perfect.
    >
    > 1. How well do people find the translation of the templates to
    > Framemaker? Is the positioning of the business cards correctly
    > preserved?
    >
    > 2. I'm using an HP inkjet to print (PSC 750). I haven't calibrated
    > the print heads because it requires that all the color cartridges be
    > working. I haven't replaced the depleted color cartridges because I
    > don't expect to use them. Does anyone have experience with how accurate
    > is the positioning of the printout without this calibration? This is
    > more critical when printing out on precut cards than when printing out
    > normally.

    Burt wrote:
    > Just print a plain paper copy and see how it lines up. Business cards are
    > usually about 2" by 3.5", so you can calculate the margins outside the cards
    > and know how much to cut off before cutting the cards apart.

    I'm actually trying to determine if the positioning on the page is the
    same on the screen as it is in hard copy. There are no delineations of
    the card edges on a plain white sheet.

    > By calibration do you mean the print head alignment? That is a minute
    > adjustment to coordinate printing of the black and color output. If that is
    > the adjustment you are asking about it will not affect placement of the text
    > on the paper. I don't know if this printer has another alignment utility to
    > adjust the printed image on the paper additional to the usual print head
    > alignment utility I mentioned.

    I'm not sure if it is a fine alignment or a gross alignment. I just know
    that the printer use to print out a calibration page with full color, then
    I had to put the calibration page on the scanner for it to calibrate.

    > Why would you want to translate the templates to another program? They work
    > fine in both MS Word and Wordperfect. I print cards on Wausau 80 # cover
    > cardstock that I purchase at a commercial paper house that sells to printing
    > firms. Cut them up with a paper cutter after they are printed. Much
    > cheaper than the precut cards. I haven't tried this stock with an inkjet
    > printer, but black text should work just fine.

    I am much more proficient with Framemaker than Word.

    I have considered cutting my own calling cards, but I really have no place
    to put a paper cutter. As well, the paper cutters that I have used have
    the habit of forcing the paper to change position slightly while cutting, so
    the edges are rarely straight. Though it might be a result of cutting more
    than one sheet at once.

    Paper cutters are big beasts, and my space is small enough that having one
    is a nontrivial consideration. However, I will looking into the pricing
    of paper cutters.

    Thanks for the info about the the card sizes and margins. I actually
    scrutinized the postscript printout of the template from word and
    compared it to my own home-made template of ten 3.5"x2" cards in Framemaker.
    They are almost identical, with only a horizontal shift of 1 point (which
    I think is 1/72 inches). So the fact that I'm making my own template in
    Framemaker is not a problem. I will see if the positioning on a plain
    8.5"x11" sheet of paper is accurate.
  2. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Just print a plain paper copy and see how it lines up. Business cards are
    usually about 2" by 3.5", so you can calculate the margins outside the cards
    and know how much to cut off before cutting the cards apart.

    By calibration do you mean the print head alignment? That is a minute
    adjustment to coordinate printing of the black and color output. If that is
    the adjustment you are asking about it will not affect placement of the text
    on the paper. I don't know if this printer has another alignment utility to
    adjust the printed image on the paper additional to the usual print head
    alignment utility I mentioned.

    Why would you want to translate the templates to another program? They work
    fine in both MS Word and Wordperfect. I print cards on Wausau 80 # cover
    cardstock that I purchase at a commercial paper house that sells to printing
    firms. Cut them up with a paper cutter after they are printed. Much
    cheaper than the precut cards. I haven't tried this stock with an inkjet
    printer, but black text should work just fine.

    "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote in message
    news:42e5399e$1_1@x-privat.org...
    >I would like to make up calling cards at home using 8.5x11 sheets of
    > Avery precut cards. Templates are provided for Word & Word Perfect.
    >
    > 1. How well do people find the translation of the templates to
    > Framemaker? Is the positioning of the business cards correctly
    > preserved?
    >
    > 2. I'm using an HP inkjet to print (PSC 750). I haven't calibrated
    > the print heads because it requires that all the color cartridges be
    > working. I haven't replaced the depleted color cartridges because I
    > don't expect to use them. Does anyone have experience with how accurate
    > is the positioning of the printout without this calibration? This is
    > more critical when printing out on precut cards than when printing out
    > normally.
  3. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Always proof spacing on plain paper.
    Uncut sheets of stock are a LOT cheaper than microperf business card stock.
    A small paper cutter doesn't take a lot of space. Some designs have a wheel
    cutter instead of the heavy blade.

    "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote in message
    news:42e5399e$1_1@x-privat.org...
    >I would like to make up calling cards at home using 8.5x11 sheets of
    > Avery precut cards. Templates are provided for Word & Word Perfect.
    >
    > 1. How well do people find the translation of the templates to
    > Framemaker? Is the positioning of the business cards correctly
    > preserved?
    >
    > 2. I'm using an HP inkjet to print (PSC 750). I haven't calibrated
    > the print heads because it requires that all the color cartridges be
    > working. I haven't replaced the depleted color cartridges because I
    > don't expect to use them. Does anyone have experience with how accurate
    > is the positioning of the printout without this calibration? This is
    > more critical when printing out on precut cards than when printing out
    > normally.
  4. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 15:12:23 -0400, "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote:

    >I would like to make up calling cards at home using 8.5x11 sheets of
    >Avery precut cards. Templates are provided for Word & Word Perfect.

    (snip rest)

    I know it's not the type of answer you were seeking, but IMOE I'd rather buy
    cards ex Vista Print (www.vistaprint.com) than bother fiddling with printing my
    own. Check them out. (No affiliation other than a more-than-once user.)
  5. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    I print out my business cards on 28 lb stock, a dozen at a time, then slice them
    up with a paper cutter and a very steady hand. Because I don't hand out
    business cards a lot, this works for me. Why buy 500 or 1000 business cards
    with high odds of a phone number or email change in this day and age? Maybe
    tomorrow I'll go VOIP, sign up with another ISP, or do something else to make my
    business cards obsolete... Ben Myers

    On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 08:50:47 +0800, budgie <me@privacy.net> wrote:

    >On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 15:12:23 -0400, "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote:
    >
    >>I would like to make up calling cards at home using 8.5x11 sheets of
    >>Avery precut cards. Templates are provided for Word & Word Perfect.
    >
    >(snip rest)
    >
    >I know it's not the type of answer you were seeking, but IMOE I'd rather buy
    >cards ex Vista Print (www.vistaprint.com) than bother fiddling with printing my
    >own. Check them out. (No affiliation other than a more-than-once user.)
  6. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 01:33:39 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben
    Myers) wrote:
    >
    >On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 08:50:47 +0800, budgie <me@privacy.net> wrote:
    >
    >>On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 15:12:23 -0400, "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I would like to make up calling cards at home using 8.5x11 sheets of
    >>>Avery precut cards. Templates are provided for Word & Word Perfect.
    >>
    >>(snip rest)
    >>
    >>I know it's not the type of answer you were seeking, but IMOE I'd rather buy
    >>cards ex Vista Print (www.vistaprint.com) than bother fiddling with printing my
    >>own. Check them out. (No affiliation other than a more-than-once user.)
    >
    >I print out my business cards on 28 lb stock, a dozen at a time, then slice them
    >up with a paper cutter and a very steady hand. Because I don't hand out
    >business cards a lot, this works for me. Why buy 500 or 1000 business cards
    >with high odds of a phone number or email change in this day and age? Maybe
    >tomorrow I'll go VOIP, sign up with another ISP, or do something else to make my
    >business cards obsolete... Ben Myers

    At the price of the commercial product from Vista, I'm prepared to take the risk
    of content obsolescence. There are "free" standard layouts and 90% of the time
    their next tier is $US4 for 250 (both plus postage). Beats the hell out of home
    brew for anyone with an actual need for biz cards. But hey if it makes you feel
    good to do your own printing/cutting then I'm happy for you.
  7. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    You can't imagine the rush of happiness I get whenever I slice and dice my own
    business cards. Pity it happens so rarely, maybe once every 6 months. At that
    rate, a supply of 250 would last me 10 years... Ben Myers

    On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 17:50:25 +0800, budgie <me@privacy.net> wrote:

    <SNIP>
    >>I print out my business cards on 28 lb stock, a dozen at a time, then slice them
    >>up with a paper cutter and a very steady hand. Because I don't hand out
    >>business cards a lot, this works for me. Why buy 500 or 1000 business cards
    >>with high odds of a phone number or email change in this day and age? Maybe
    >>tomorrow I'll go VOIP, sign up with another ISP, or do something else to make my
    >>business cards obsolete... Ben Myers
    >
    >At the price of the commercial product from Vista, I'm prepared to take the risk
    >of content obsolescence. There are "free" standard layouts and 90% of the time
    >their next tier is $US4 for 250 (both plus postage). Beats the hell out of home
    >brew for anyone with an actual need for biz cards. But hey if it makes you feel
    >good to do your own printing/cutting then I'm happy for you.
  8. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote:
    > I would like to make up calling cards at home using 8.5x11 sheets of
    > Avery precut cards. Templates are provided for Word & Word Perfect.

    budgie <me@privacy.net> wrote:
    > I know it's not the type of answer you were seeking, but IMOE I'd
    > rather buy cards ex Vista Print (www.vistaprint.com) than bother
    > fiddling with printing my own. Check them out. (No affiliation
    > other than a more-than-once user.)

    ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote:
    > I print out my business cards on 28 lb stock, a dozen at a time,
    > then slice them up with a paper cutter and a very steady hand.
    > Because I don't hand out business cards a lot, this works for me.
    > Why buy 500 or 1000 business cards with high odds of a phone number
    > or email change in this day and age? Maybe tomorrow I'll go VOIP,
    > sign up with another ISP, or do something else to make my business
    > cards obsolete... Ben Myers

    budgie <me@privacy.net> wrote:
    > At the price of the commercial product from Vista, I'm prepared to
    > take the risk of content obsolescence. There are "free" standard
    > layouts and 90% of the time their next tier is $US4 for 250 (both
    > plus postage). Beats the hell out of home brew for anyone with an
    > actual need for biz cards. But hey if it makes you feel good to do
    > your own printing/cutting then I'm happy for you.

    I believe that there are other reasons besides a large backlog of
    business cards for not wanting to change one's contact information
    frequently. A major reason is that you would have to send new
    business cards to people who have your old one. Unless they replace
    your old one with your new one right away, it could become confusing
    for them. If they have you in the organizer, they would have to
    update that, too.

    Having said that, however, I have to admit that I could be changing my
    calling card somewhat frequently for the next little while. I am in
    the information gathering phase of planning a next career step; the
    details of how I want to present myself will become refined as I meet
    with more professional practitioners to get their view on the
    industry. Though my contact info remains the same, the content must
    be agile -- not only will I change content frequently, and thus need
    small quantities, it would be inconvenient to wait several days to get
    revised cards.

    I have done a cost comparison between printing & cutting my own cards,
    printing onto Avery pre-perforated cards, and having a PDF printed and
    cut by a local print shop. I am assuming 10 cards/page, though one
    can squeeze out 12 with landscape layout; this is not generally
    supported by professional print/cut shops.

    1. Print & cut myself
    ---------------------
    * 110 lb paper, pprox. $0.10/page
    * Injet printing (OK, not super) about $0.07/page
    * Assume cutter for 110 lb paper should be lever type, for clean
    edge (minimum $50, upto $100+)
    * Total: $0.17/page,
    plus $50~$100 for a cutter (and space to store it)

    2. Avery pre-perforated (clean edge)
    ------------------------------------
    * $1.33/page
    * Injet printing (OK, not super) about $0.07/page
    * Total: $1.40/page

    3. Print & cut by shop
    ----------------------
    * $1.25/page (laser printed)
    * $1.00 overhead to extract 10-up content from PDF file
    - This is understandable. I spent a while just fiddling around
    to find proper layout, which differed on the printed page
    versus on-screen PDF (turned out to be a printer setting)
    - Assuming 3 page/order, this adds 0.33/page
    * $1.00/page to cut
    * Total: $2.58/page, clean laser quality

    4. Local Campus print shop
    --------------------------
    * $1.25/page
    * $10 fixed cost on top of page charge
    * Assuming 3 page/order, this adds $3.33/page
    * Total: $4.58/page

    For *self-printing* ink-jet quality, #1 is a clear winner for the
    long-haul. For the immediate term, #2 is the clear winner. My
    ink-jet (PSC-750) is pretty good. There is some fuzziness (more like
    a softness) when the printed card is observed at regular viewing
    distance. It is not until one scrutinizes the print up close that it
    becomes clear that the outline of the letters are a bit "hairy".

    For laser quality, #3 is the clear winner, though #4 *might* be more
    likely to respond the same day rather then the next day.

    So the strategy moving forward is to use #3 for the laser quality
    (these things matter to the viewer at an unconscious level). If the
    volume seems to be getting excessive, I can revert to #2, with the
    associated drop in paper & print quality. For truely large volume or
    long-haul, I'll drop to #1. #4 is a contingency for emergencies (and
    it isn't even for sure that the turn-around time will be quicker than
    for #3 -- it will probably be situation-specific).

    Thanks for your thoughts on this.
  9. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Just a point I forgot to add: For shop-printed cards, glossy finish
    is an option that seems to add a touch of class or professionalism
    to the card, but if the recipient of the card writes nots on the card,
    the writing seems to smear more readily.

    Anonymous, Kinda wrote:
    > "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote:
    > > I would like to make up calling cards at home using 8.5x11 sheets of
    > > Avery precut cards. Templates are provided for Word & Word Perfect.
    >
    > budgie <me@privacy.net> wrote:
    > > I know it's not the type of answer you were seeking, but IMOE I'd
    > > rather buy cards ex Vista Print (www.vistaprint.com) than bother
    > > fiddling with printing my own. Check them out. (No affiliation
    > > other than a more-than-once user.)
    >
    > ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote:
    > > I print out my business cards on 28 lb stock, a dozen at a time,
    > > then slice them up with a paper cutter and a very steady hand.
    > > Because I don't hand out business cards a lot, this works for me.
    > > Why buy 500 or 1000 business cards with high odds of a phone number
    > > or email change in this day and age? Maybe tomorrow I'll go VOIP,
    > > sign up with another ISP, or do something else to make my business
    > > cards obsolete... Ben Myers
    >
    > budgie <me@privacy.net> wrote:
    > > At the price of the commercial product from Vista, I'm prepared to
    > > take the risk of content obsolescence. There are "free" standard
    > > layouts and 90% of the time their next tier is $US4 for 250 (both
    > > plus postage). Beats the hell out of home brew for anyone with an
    > > actual need for biz cards. But hey if it makes you feel good to do
    > > your own printing/cutting then I'm happy for you.
    >
    > I believe that there are other reasons besides a large backlog of
    > business cards for not wanting to change one's contact information
    > frequently. A major reason is that you would have to send new
    > business cards to people who have your old one. Unless they replace
    > your old one with your new one right away, it could become confusing
    > for them. If they have you in the organizer, they would have to
    > update that, too.
    >
    > Having said that, however, I have to admit that I could be changing my
    > calling card somewhat frequently for the next little while. I am in
    > the information gathering phase of planning a next career step; the
    > details of how I want to present myself will become refined as I meet
    > with more professional practitioners to get their view on the
    > industry. Though my contact info remains the same, the content must
    > be agile -- not only will I change content frequently, and thus need
    > small quantities, it would be inconvenient to wait several days to get
    > revised cards.
    >
    > I have done a cost comparison between printing & cutting my own cards,
    > printing onto Avery pre-perforated cards, and having a PDF printed and
    > cut by a local print shop. I am assuming 10 cards/page, though one
    > can squeeze out 12 with landscape layout; this is not generally
    > supported by professional print/cut shops.
    >
    > 1. Print & cut myself
    > ---------------------
    > * 110 lb paper, pprox. $0.10/page
    > * Injet printing (OK, not super) about $0.07/page
    > * Assume cutter for 110 lb paper should be lever type, for clean
    > edge (minimum $50, upto $100+)
    > * Total: $0.17/page,
    > plus $50~$100 for a cutter (and space to store it)
    >
    > 2. Avery pre-perforated (clean edge)
    > ------------------------------------
    > * $1.33/page
    > * Injet printing (OK, not super) about $0.07/page
    > * Total: $1.40/page
    >
    > 3. Print & cut by shop
    > ----------------------
    > * $1.25/page (laser printed)
    > * $1.00 overhead to extract 10-up content from PDF file
    > - This is understandable. I spent a while just fiddling around
    > to find proper layout, which differed on the printed page
    > versus on-screen PDF (turned out to be a printer setting)
    > - Assuming 3 page/order, this adds 0.33/page
    > * $1.00/page to cut
    > * Total: $2.58/page, clean laser quality
    >
    > 4. Local Campus print shop
    > --------------------------
    > * $1.25/page
    > * $10 fixed cost on top of page charge
    > * Assuming 3 page/order, this adds $3.33/page
    > * Total: $4.58/page
    >
    > For *self-printing* ink-jet quality, #1 is a clear winner for the
    > long-haul. For the immediate term, #2 is the clear winner. My
    > ink-jet (PSC-750) is pretty good. There is some fuzziness (more like
    > a softness) when the printed card is observed at regular viewing
    > distance. It is not until one scrutinizes the print up close that it
    > becomes clear that the outline of the letters are a bit "hairy".
    >
    > For laser quality, #3 is the clear winner, though #4 *might* be more
    > likely to respond the same day rather then the next day.
    >
    > So the strategy moving forward is to use #3 for the laser quality
    > (these things matter to the viewer at an unconscious level). If the
    > volume seems to be getting excessive, I can revert to #2, with the
    > associated drop in paper & print quality. For truely large volume or
    > long-haul, I'll drop to #1. #4 is a contingency for emergencies (and
    > it isn't even for sure that the turn-around time will be quicker than
    > for #3 -- it will probably be situation-specific).
    >
    > Thanks for your thoughts on this.
  10. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    In addition, being in a phase of career transition, you may want to present
    yourself differently for different professional and business opportunities.
    It's very easy to bang out 10 or 12 business cards customized for ones
    profession du jour.

    I bought a nice sharp paper cutter from Quill a number of years ago. I can lay
    out 12 cards of 2"x3 1/2" dimensions in landscape on a single 8 1/2" x 11" piece
    of paper. Do the math and that leaves 1/4" to trim off all sides... Ben Myers

    On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 14:16:47 -0400, "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote:

    >Just a point I forgot to add: For shop-printed cards, glossy finish
    >is an option that seems to add a touch of class or professionalism
    >to the card, but if the recipient of the card writes nots on the card,
    >the writing seems to smear more readily.
    >
    >Anonymous, Kinda wrote:
    >> "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote:
    >> > I would like to make up calling cards at home using 8.5x11 sheets of
    >> > Avery precut cards. Templates are provided for Word & Word Perfect.
    >>
    >> budgie <me@privacy.net> wrote:
    >> > I know it's not the type of answer you were seeking, but IMOE I'd
    >> > rather buy cards ex Vista Print (www.vistaprint.com) than bother
    >> > fiddling with printing my own. Check them out. (No affiliation
    >> > other than a more-than-once user.)
    >>
    >> ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote:
    >> > I print out my business cards on 28 lb stock, a dozen at a time,
    >> > then slice them up with a paper cutter and a very steady hand.
    >> > Because I don't hand out business cards a lot, this works for me.
    >> > Why buy 500 or 1000 business cards with high odds of a phone number
    >> > or email change in this day and age? Maybe tomorrow I'll go VOIP,
    >> > sign up with another ISP, or do something else to make my business
    >> > cards obsolete... Ben Myers
    >>
    >> budgie <me@privacy.net> wrote:
    >> > At the price of the commercial product from Vista, I'm prepared to
    >> > take the risk of content obsolescence. There are "free" standard
    >> > layouts and 90% of the time their next tier is $US4 for 250 (both
    >> > plus postage). Beats the hell out of home brew for anyone with an
    >> > actual need for biz cards. But hey if it makes you feel good to do
    >> > your own printing/cutting then I'm happy for you.
    >>
    >> I believe that there are other reasons besides a large backlog of
    >> business cards for not wanting to change one's contact information
    >> frequently. A major reason is that you would have to send new
    >> business cards to people who have your old one. Unless they replace
    >> your old one with your new one right away, it could become confusing
    >> for them. If they have you in the organizer, they would have to
    >> update that, too.
    >>
    >> Having said that, however, I have to admit that I could be changing my
    >> calling card somewhat frequently for the next little while. I am in
    >> the information gathering phase of planning a next career step; the
    >> details of how I want to present myself will become refined as I meet
    >> with more professional practitioners to get their view on the
    >> industry. Though my contact info remains the same, the content must
    >> be agile -- not only will I change content frequently, and thus need
    >> small quantities, it would be inconvenient to wait several days to get
    >> revised cards.
    >>
    >> I have done a cost comparison between printing & cutting my own cards,
    >> printing onto Avery pre-perforated cards, and having a PDF printed and
    >> cut by a local print shop. I am assuming 10 cards/page, though one
    >> can squeeze out 12 with landscape layout; this is not generally
    >> supported by professional print/cut shops.
    >>
    >> 1. Print & cut myself
    >> ---------------------
    >> * 110 lb paper, pprox. $0.10/page
    >> * Injet printing (OK, not super) about $0.07/page
    >> * Assume cutter for 110 lb paper should be lever type, for clean
    >> edge (minimum $50, upto $100+)
    >> * Total: $0.17/page,
    >> plus $50~$100 for a cutter (and space to store it)
    >>
    >> 2. Avery pre-perforated (clean edge)
    >> ------------------------------------
    >> * $1.33/page
    >> * Injet printing (OK, not super) about $0.07/page
    >> * Total: $1.40/page
    >>
    >> 3. Print & cut by shop
    >> ----------------------
    >> * $1.25/page (laser printed)
    >> * $1.00 overhead to extract 10-up content from PDF file
    >> - This is understandable. I spent a while just fiddling around
    >> to find proper layout, which differed on the printed page
    >> versus on-screen PDF (turned out to be a printer setting)
    >> - Assuming 3 page/order, this adds 0.33/page
    >> * $1.00/page to cut
    >> * Total: $2.58/page, clean laser quality
    >>
    >> 4. Local Campus print shop
    >> --------------------------
    >> * $1.25/page
    >> * $10 fixed cost on top of page charge
    >> * Assuming 3 page/order, this adds $3.33/page
    >> * Total: $4.58/page
    >>
    >> For *self-printing* ink-jet quality, #1 is a clear winner for the
    >> long-haul. For the immediate term, #2 is the clear winner. My
    >> ink-jet (PSC-750) is pretty good. There is some fuzziness (more like
    >> a softness) when the printed card is observed at regular viewing
    >> distance. It is not until one scrutinizes the print up close that it
    >> becomes clear that the outline of the letters are a bit "hairy".
    >>
    >> For laser quality, #3 is the clear winner, though #4 *might* be more
    >> likely to respond the same day rather then the next day.
    >>
    >> So the strategy moving forward is to use #3 for the laser quality
    >> (these things matter to the viewer at an unconscious level). If the
    >> volume seems to be getting excessive, I can revert to #2, with the
    >> associated drop in paper & print quality. For truely large volume or
    >> long-haul, I'll drop to #1. #4 is a contingency for emergencies (and
    >> it isn't even for sure that the turn-around time will be quicker than
    >> for #3 -- it will probably be situation-specific).
    >>
    >> Thanks for your thoughts on this.
  11. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    In article <42e5399e$1_1@x-privat.org>,
    "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote:

    > I would like to make up calling cards at home using 8.5x11 sheets of
    > Avery precut cards. Templates are provided for Word & Word Perfect.

    Precut cards works well if you do not have any design elements near the
    border of an individual card.
    Otherwise (bleeding edges etc) use a full sheet with no precuts, mark
    cut lines in FrameMaker, and cut by hand. This is because the image in
    laser printers and such will not always end up in the same place on the
    page (up to a few millimeters tolerance because of the paper feed).

    > 1. How well do people find the translation of the templates to
    > Framemaker? Is the positioning of the business cards correctly
    > preserved?

    Why bother - create your own in Frame-Maker. What works best for me is
    to create a frame or rectangle (no border) with the exact dimensions of
    an ingdividual card, and place all the design elements in it.
    Then group and copy as many times as you need, aligning and distributing
    accordingly.
    If you need a template for the idea, send e-mail, I'll send you mine in
    FrameMaker.

    HTH

    Marc

    --
    Switzerland/Europe
    <http://www.heusser.com>
    remove CHEERS and from MERCIAL to get valid e-mail
  12. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    For cutting - try adding cut marks to your template and buying an Xacto #11
    Frisket Knife and a metal straight edge(S/B ~~ $10.00)

    For printing - I have made variations of my 'Business Card' on "Kirkland
    Photo Paper" (10 mil thickness, nice and stiff, bright glossy surface,
    Costco stock number 26352. $18.99 for 125 sheets ... or about 0.15 per
    sheet).

    Oh ... and if at all possible, use a VECTOR GRAPHICS program such as Corel
    Draw or Adobe Illustrator. You can easily duplicate the "template" with
    either of these programs, and they are *much* better for typesetting.
  13. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    RSD99 wrote:
    > For cutting - try adding cut marks to your template and buying an Xacto #11
    > Frisket Knife and a metal straight edge(S/B ~~ $10.00)

    Hmm, interesting. I can get a wooden board on which to cut the sheet.
    Sounds like a good idea to try out. I'm curious, is your suggestion
    from experience?

    > For printing - I have made variations of my 'Business Card' on "Kirkland
    > Photo Paper" (10 mil thickness, nice and stiff, bright glossy surface,
    > Costco stock number 26352. $18.99 for 125 sheets ... or about 0.15 per
    > sheet).

    OK, I've noted that as a good medium on which to make cards. I don't
    have a Costco membership, but something to keep in mind for if I do.
    It sounds similar to 110 lb paper. I'd probably go for matt as I found
    that writing on semigloss smears easily.

    > Oh ... and if at all possible, use a VECTOR GRAPHICS program such as Corel
    > Draw or Adobe Illustrator. You can easily duplicate the "template" with
    > either of these programs, and they are *much* better for typesetting.

    I use Framemaker without any pixelized content, which does a pretty
    good job. It was easy to come up with the template just by studying
    the Word template. The only trick was printing the resulting PDF.
    The printing options had to be set to *not* resize to fit page before
    it printed out properly. The default setting was to resize the
    content. It seemed that this shrunk the entire 8.5"x11" PDF to fit
    within the printable portion of the physical sheet, which probably
    excludes a margin area around the edges due to limitations in the
    physical design of the printer.

    Thanks for your suggestion.
  14. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    RSD99 wrote:
    > For cutting - try adding cut marks to your template and buying an Xacto #11
    > Frisket Knife and a metal straight edge(S/B ~~ $10.00)

    Hmm, interesting. I can get a wooden board on which to cut the sheet.
    Sounds like a good idea to try out. I'm curious, is your suggestion
    from experience?

    > For printing - I have made variations of my 'Business Card' on "Kirkland
    > Photo Paper" (10 mil thickness, nice and stiff, bright glossy surface,
    > Costco stock number 26352. $18.99 for 125 sheets ... or about 0.15 per
    > sheet).

    OK, I've noted that as a good medium on which to make cards. I don't
    have a Costco membership, but something to keep in mind for if I do.
    It sounds similar to 110 lb paper. I'd probably go for matt as I found
    that writing on semigloss smears easily.

    > Oh ... and if at all possible, use a VECTOR GRAPHICS program such as Corel
    > Draw or Adobe Illustrator. You can easily duplicate the "template" with
    > either of these programs, and they are *much* better for typesetting.

    I use Framemaker without any pixelized content, which does a pretty
    good job. It was easy to come up with the template just by studying
    the Word template. The only trick was printing the resulting PDF.
    The printing options had to be set to *not* resize to fit page before
    it printed out properly. The default setting was to resize the
    content. It seemed that this shrunk the entire 8.5"x11" PDF to fit
    within the printable portion of the physical sheet, which probably
    excludes a margin area around the edges due to limitations in the
    physical design of the printer.

    Thanks for your suggestion.
  15. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Chuck wrote:
    > Always proof spacing on plain paper.

    Yes, I found that this was necessary.

    > Uncut sheets of stock are a LOT cheaper than microperf business card stock.

    For sure.

    > A small paper cutter doesn't take a lot of space. Some designs have a wheel
    > cutter instead of the heavy blade.

    I saw some rather compact cutters at low prices ($30+), but the staff
    at the store suggested that for heavy paper, and considering that a
    clean cut is essential, to go with the bigger lever cutters. Have
    you found that the smaller cutters give a clean cut on heavy paper?
    Was durability an issue?

    > "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote in message
    > news:42e5399e$1_1@x-privat.org...
    >
    >>I would like to make up calling cards at home using 8.5x11 sheets of
    >>Avery precut cards. Templates are provided for Word & Word Perfect.
    >>
    >>1. How well do people find the translation of the templates to
    >>Framemaker? Is the positioning of the business cards correctly
    >>preserved?
    >>
    >>2. I'm using an HP inkjet to print (PSC 750). I haven't calibrated
    >>the print heads because it requires that all the color cartridges be
    >>working. I haven't replaced the depleted color cartridges because I
    >>don't expect to use them. Does anyone have experience with how accurate
    >>is the positioning of the printout without this calibration? This is
    >>more critical when printing out on precut cards than when printing out
    >>normally.
  16. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Marc Heusser wrote:
    >In article <42e5399e$1_1@x-privat.org>, "Anonymous, Kinda"
    ><Anon@nymous.net> wrote:
    >
    >>I would like to make up calling cards at home using 8.5x11 sheets of
    >>Avery precut cards. Templates are provided for Word & Word Perfect.
    >
    > Precut cards works well if you do not have any design elements near the
    > border of an individual card.
    > Otherwise (bleeding edges etc) use a full sheet with no precuts, mark
    > cut lines in FrameMaker, and cut by hand. This is because the image in
    > laser printers and such will not always end up in the same place on the
    > page (up to a few millimeters tolerance because of the paper feed).

    I found that the position on the printed image was slightly different
    from the position of the image on the virtual page on the screen, as
    measured from the page edge. So your idea of marking where to cut is
    certainly practical.

    >>1. How well do people find the translation of the templates to
    >>Framemaker? Is the positioning of the business cards correctly
    >>preserved?
    >
    > Why bother - create your own in Frame-Maker. What works best for me
    > is to create a frame or rectangle (no border) with the exact
    > dimensions of an ingdividual card, and place all the design elements
    > in it. Then group and copy as many times as you need, aligning and
    > distributing accordingly. If you need a template for the idea, send
    > e-mail, I'll send you mine in FrameMaker. HTH Marc

    Actually, I did create my own template in a manner similar to what
    you describe. Thanks for the offer, and your suggestions.
  17. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    RSD99 wrote:

    >For cutting - try adding cut marks to your template and buying an Xacto #11
    >Frisket Knife and a metal straight edge(S/B ~~ $10.00)
    >
    >For printing - I have made variations of my 'Business Card' on "Kirkland
    >Photo Paper" (10 mil thickness, nice and stiff, bright glossy surface,
    >Costco stock number 26352. $18.99 for 125 sheets ... or about 0.15 per
    >sheet).
    >
    >

    GREAT STUFF

    >Oh ... and if at all possible, use a VECTOR GRAPHICS program such as Corel
    >Draw or Adobe Illustrator. You can easily duplicate the "template" with
    >either of these programs, and they are *much* better for typesetting.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
  18. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Fiskars makes a branded rotary cutter that is sold at Costco for under
    $30.00/ It does a great job.

    Anonymous, Kinda wrote:

    > Chuck wrote:
    > > Always proof spacing on plain paper.
    >
    > Yes, I found that this was necessary.
    >
    > > Uncut sheets of stock are a LOT cheaper than microperf business
    > card stock.
    >
    > For sure.
    >
    > > A small paper cutter doesn't take a lot of space. Some designs have
    > a wheel
    > > cutter instead of the heavy blade.
    >
    > I saw some rather compact cutters at low prices ($30+), but the staff
    > at the store suggested that for heavy paper, and considering that a
    > clean cut is essential, to go with the bigger lever cutters. Have
    > you found that the smaller cutters give a clean cut on heavy paper?
    > Was durability an issue?
    >
    > > "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote in message
    > > news:42e5399e$1_1@x-privat.org...
    > >
    > >>I would like to make up calling cards at home using 8.5x11 sheets of
    > >>Avery precut cards. Templates are provided for Word & Word Perfect.
    > >>
    > >>1. How well do people find the translation of the templates to
    > >>Framemaker? Is the positioning of the business cards correctly
    > >>preserved?
    > >>
    > >>2. I'm using an HP inkjet to print (PSC 750). I haven't calibrated
    > >>the print heads because it requires that all the color cartridges be
    > >>working. I haven't replaced the depleted color cartridges because I
    > >>don't expect to use them. Does anyone have experience with how
    > accurate
    > >>is the positioning of the printout without this calibration? This is
    > >>more critical when printing out on precut cards than when printing out
    > >>normally.
  19. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    measekite wrote:
    > Fiskars makes a branded rotary cutter that is sold at Costco for under
    > $30.00/ It does a great job.

    Since I don't have a Costco membership, I searched for Fiskars at the
    website for our local office supplies store:
    http://www.staples.ca/ENG/Catalog/cat_results.asp?txtSearch=fiskars

    There are two 12" personal trimmers, a 12" rotary trimmer, and an 8.5"
    trimmer, ranging from $20 to $70. I mentioned in another post that
    home-cut cards may be a good option once I establish my usage pattern
    and the volume is adquately high. The trade-off is the inkjet print
    quality. Thanks for sharing your experience with cutters for
    home-cutting.
  20. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    I made a simle Word.doc file that prints tic marks on the sides (2 inches
    apart) and top edges (3.5 inches apart) on 8.5 x 11 card stock. Then print
    business cards using software of your choice (Word, Publisher, etc.). With
    a razor knife and a straight edge, I cut the cards out using the tic marks
    as a cutting guide.

    I can send you this simple file if you email me.

    Regards,

    --
    Dave C.

    c9ar9dar9elli@9c4.n9et

    Remove the five 9's (leave the 4) for email.


    "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote in message
    news:42e8635c_2@x-privat.org...
    > Marc Heusser wrote:
    > >In article <42e5399e$1_1@x-privat.org>, "Anonymous, Kinda"
    > ><Anon@nymous.net> wrote:
    > >
    > >>I would like to make up calling cards at home using 8.5x11 sheets of
    > >>Avery precut cards. Templates are provided for Word & Word Perfect.
    > >
    > > Precut cards works well if you do not have any design elements near the
    > > border of an individual card.
    > > Otherwise (bleeding edges etc) use a full sheet with no precuts, mark
    > > cut lines in FrameMaker, and cut by hand. This is because the image in
    > > laser printers and such will not always end up in the same place on the
    > > page (up to a few millimeters tolerance because of the paper feed).
    >
    > I found that the position on the printed image was slightly different
    > from the position of the image on the virtual page on the screen, as
    > measured from the page edge. So your idea of marking where to cut is
    > certainly practical.
    >
    > >>1. How well do people find the translation of the templates to
    > >>Framemaker? Is the positioning of the business cards correctly
    > >>preserved?
    > >
    > > Why bother - create your own in Frame-Maker. What works best for me
    > > is to create a frame or rectangle (no border) with the exact
    > > dimensions of an ingdividual card, and place all the design elements
    > > in it. Then group and copy as many times as you need, aligning and
    > > distributing accordingly. If you need a template for the idea, send
    > > e-mail, I'll send you mine in FrameMaker. HTH Marc
    >
    > Actually, I did create my own template in a manner similar to what
    > you describe. Thanks for the offer, and your suggestions.
  21. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Dave C. wrote:
    > I made a simle Word.doc file that prints tic marks on the sides (2
    > inches apart) and top edges (3.5 inches apart) on 8.5 x 11 card
    > stock. Then print business cards using software of your choice
    > (Word, Publisher, etc.). With a razor knife and a straight edge, I
    > cut the cards out using the tic marks as a cutting guide. I can
    > send you this simple file if you email me. Regards, -- Dave C.

    Dave,

    Thanks for the suggestion. I can do this in Framemaker, but I
    appreciate your offer.
  22. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    You're welcome

    --
    Dave C.

    c9ar9dar9elli@9c4.n9et

    Remove the five 9's (leave the 4) for email.


    "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote in message
    news:42e9b003_2@x-privat.org...
    > Dave C. wrote:
    > > I made a simle Word.doc file that prints tic marks on the sides (2
    > > inches apart) and top edges (3.5 inches apart) on 8.5 x 11 card
    > > stock. Then print business cards using software of your choice
    > > (Word, Publisher, etc.). With a razor knife and a straight edge, I
    > > cut the cards out using the tic marks as a cutting guide. I can
    > > send you this simple file if you email me. Regards, -- Dave C.
    >
    > Dave,
    >
    > Thanks for the suggestion. I can do this in Framemaker, but I
    > appreciate your offer.
  23. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Dave C. wrote:
    > I made a simle Word.doc file that prints tic marks on the sides (2
    > inches apart) and top edges (3.5 inches apart) on 8.5 x 11 card
    > stock. Then print business cards using software of your choice
    > (Word, Publisher, etc.). With a razor knife and a straight edge, I
    > cut the cards out using the tic marks as a cutting guide. I can
    > send you this simple file if you email me. Regards, -- Dave C.

    "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote:
    > Dave, Thanks for the suggestion. I can do this in Framemaker, but I
    > appreciate your offer.

    Dave C. wrote:
    > You're welcome -- Dave C.

    Hi, Dave,

    I think I spoke too soon. I'm having trouble envisioning where you might
    put these cut marks so that they don't actually run along the edges of the
    cut (as in cutted) cards. The only way I can see that happening is if the
    cards are not abutted. Is that how you've done it? If so, I can come up
    with a pattern of cut marks, but it allows fewer cards per sheet then
    abutted cards. The waste paper surrounding each card will also be slim,
    but that might not be a problem.

    If the cards *are* abutted -- say 10-up, in 2 columns of 5 -- then one
    might leave cut marks at the margins surrounding the 10-card
    aggretate. But the moment you make a cut, some of the cut pieces will
    be missing cut marks either at the starting or ending points of the
    cut.

    For abutted cards, I can deal with the problem of missing cut marks in
    the margins by projecting the cut marks into the 10-card aggregate
    (along the edges of the individual cards), but this creates an erratic
    shadow along the edge of each card.

    Thanks for letting me know. If you have the template, could you
    please send it to me at gor4ba4san@ya4hoo.ca (Remove the three 4's)?
    Thanks!

    P.S. According to the specs for the printer (HP PSC750), it can print
    on 110 lb paper, but it seems to smear. Probably too close to the
    ink nozzels. I tried to buy a few sheets of next lighter paper from
    the local copy shop, and it works great, but the paper is *way*
    lighter than 110 lb. Even though they said it was 90 lb, I can't see
    that -- the Avery clean-edge cards have stiffness between the 110 lb
    and "90 lb", and there is noticable difference between them. I will
    contact them to see if they might have grabbed the wrong paper.
    Everything is closed down for today and tomorrow though (Canadian
    holiday).
  24. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Hammermill "Signs and Notices" 54 lb stock is plenty heavy for my use.

    .... Ben Myers

    On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 19:03:10 -0400, "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote:

    >Dave C. wrote:
    > > I made a simle Word.doc file that prints tic marks on the sides (2
    > > inches apart) and top edges (3.5 inches apart) on 8.5 x 11 card
    > > stock. Then print business cards using software of your choice
    > > (Word, Publisher, etc.). With a razor knife and a straight edge, I
    > > cut the cards out using the tic marks as a cutting guide. I can
    > > send you this simple file if you email me. Regards, -- Dave C.
    >
    >"Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote:
    > > Dave, Thanks for the suggestion. I can do this in Framemaker, but I
    > > appreciate your offer.
    >
    >Dave C. wrote:
    > > You're welcome -- Dave C.
    >
    >Hi, Dave,
    >
    >I think I spoke too soon. I'm having trouble envisioning where you might
    >put these cut marks so that they don't actually run along the edges of the
    >cut (as in cutted) cards. The only way I can see that happening is if the
    >cards are not abutted. Is that how you've done it? If so, I can come up
    >with a pattern of cut marks, but it allows fewer cards per sheet then
    >abutted cards. The waste paper surrounding each card will also be slim,
    >but that might not be a problem.
    >
    >If the cards *are* abutted -- say 10-up, in 2 columns of 5 -- then one
    >might leave cut marks at the margins surrounding the 10-card
    >aggretate. But the moment you make a cut, some of the cut pieces will
    >be missing cut marks either at the starting or ending points of the
    >cut.
    >
    >For abutted cards, I can deal with the problem of missing cut marks in
    >the margins by projecting the cut marks into the 10-card aggregate
    >(along the edges of the individual cards), but this creates an erratic
    >shadow along the edge of each card.
    >
    >Thanks for letting me know. If you have the template, could you
    >please send it to me at gor4ba4san@ya4hoo.ca (Remove the three 4's)?
    >Thanks!
    >
    >P.S. According to the specs for the printer (HP PSC750), it can print
    >on 110 lb paper, but it seems to smear. Probably too close to the
    >ink nozzels. I tried to buy a few sheets of next lighter paper from
    >the local copy shop, and it works great, but the paper is *way*
    >lighter than 110 lb. Even though they said it was 90 lb, I can't see
    >that -- the Avery clean-edge cards have stiffness between the 110 lb
    >and "90 lb", and there is noticable difference between them. I will
    >contact them to see if they might have grabbed the wrong paper.
    >Everything is closed down for today and tomorrow though (Canadian
    >holiday).
  25. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote in message
    news:42e5399e$1_1@x-privat.org...
    >I would like to make up calling cards at home using 8.5x11 sheets of
    > Avery precut cards. Templates are provided for Word & Word Perfect.
    >
    > 1. How well do people find the translation of the templates to
    > Framemaker? Is the positioning of the business cards correctly
    > preserved?
    >
    > 2. I'm using an HP inkjet to print (PSC 750). I haven't calibrated
    > the print heads because it requires that all the color cartridges be
    > working. I haven't replaced the depleted color cartridges because I
    > don't expect to use them. Does anyone have experience with how accurate
    > is the positioning of the printout without this calibration? This is
    > more critical when printing out on precut cards than when printing out
    > normally.

    I'm not sure what benefit you derive by reinventing the wheel. The MS word
    or Wordperfect avery business card templates have a know waste margin on all
    sides and are abutted with no waste between them. With any papercutter that
    has a decent measuring device or guide on it you don't need the cut marks.
    Simply use the ruler guide to cut off the waste all the way around and then
    use the guide to cut the cards apart. After you cut the first few sheets
    you will not even have to think the measurements through. If you are off by
    a hair it really doesn't matter. No one is going to hold one card next to
    the other to be certain that you cut them absolutely perfectly. Very, very,
    very close is good enough. You can incorporate graphics by importing them
    if you wish. If you want something other than straight text you can compose
    a file in photoshop or any other program that can manipulate text, save the
    file, and import it into the Word or WP page once the format is set to the
    avery business card template. It can be resized, moved, and copied mulitple
    times to fill out all the slots in the template. Very short learning curve
    in either program.

    I don't mean to appear mean-spirited when I say that by the time you have
    thought the problem through, communicated with several very well meaning
    and capable people on this NG, and gone back to the computer to put all this
    newfound knowledge to work, you could have printed and cut a few hundred
    cards, several times over! Of course, this discounts the intellectual
    challange to do it in a different manner with other software, and I do
    recognize the pleasure of figuring out something yourself rather than
    following a well-worn, beaten path. For many of us the journey is as
    important as reaching the destination.
  26. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Ben Myers wrote:
    > Hammermill "Signs and Notices" 54 lb stock is plenty heavy for my use.
    > ... Ben Myers


    The cardstock I got is 65 lb. Seems flimsy. Not that it necessarily
    matters. The only thing that matters is how it comes across to the
    person receiving it. I can only guess what what that may be based on
    my own impression. Now I have your impression as a "data point" too.
    Thanks.
  27. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Burt wrote:
    > "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote:
    >>I would like to make up calling cards at home using 8.5x11 sheets of
    >>Avery precut cards. Templates are provided for Word & Word Perfect.
    >>1. How well do people find the translation of the templates to
    >>Framemaker? Is the positioning of the business cards correctly
    >>preserved?
    >>2. I'm using an HP inkjet to print (PSC 750). I haven't calibrated
    >>the print heads because it requires that all the color cartridges be
    >>working. I haven't replaced the depleted color cartridges because I
    >>don't expect to use them. Does anyone have experience with how accurate
    >>is the positioning of the printout without this calibration? This is
    >>more critical when printing out on precut cards than when printing out
    >>normally.
    >
    > I'm not sure what benefit you derive by reinventing the wheel. The MS word
    > or Wordperfect avery business card templates have a know waste margin on all
    > sides and are abutted with no waste between them. With any papercutter that
    > has a decent measuring device or guide on it you don't need the cut marks.
    > Simply use the ruler guide to cut off the waste all the way around and then
    > use the guide to cut the cards apart. After you cut the first few sheets
    > you will not even have to think the measurements through. If you are off by
    > a hair it really doesn't matter. No one is going to hold one card next to
    > the other to be certain that you cut them absolutely perfectly. Very, very,
    > very close is good enough.

    I realize I'm reinventing the wheel, but from past experience, I know
    how much difference it makes for me to use FM versus Word. With FM, I
    don't have to think about how to do things, I just think about what
    visual effect I want to achieve. With Word, I'm spending all my time
    wrestling to achieve every single effect, and no energy left to
    contemplate how I might want to change the look. Besides, I've found
    that duplicating the margins and layout of the Word template is not
    hard.

    > You can incorporate graphics by importing them
    > if you wish. If you want something other than straight text you can compose
    > a file in photoshop or any other program that can manipulate text, save the
    > file, and import it into the Word or WP page once the format is set to the
    > avery business card template. It can be resized, moved, and copied mulitple
    > times to fill out all the slots in the template. Very short learning curve
    > in either program.

    It's just me. I've used FM too long. I've done huge technical reports with
    Word, with technical drawings, and incorporated huge sections from other
    authors (repairing all cross-references in doing so), but feel much more
    comfortable with FM. I'm glad to find that it's not really an issue, and
    didn't take an inordinant amount of time.

    > I don't mean to appear mean-spirited when I say that by the time you have
    > thought the problem through, communicated with several very well meaning
    > and capable people on this NG, and gone back to the computer to put all this
    > newfound knowledge to work, you could have printed and cut a few hundred
    > cards, several times over! Of course, this discounts the intellectual
    > challange to do it in a different manner with other software, and I do
    > recognize the pleasure of figuring out something yourself rather than
    > following a well-worn, beaten path. For many of us the journey is as
    > important as reaching the destination.

    You don't sound mean-spirited, though you are presuming my
    motivations. The original problem described at the top was resolved
    very quickly, and I am now resolving other issues which would
    certainly have gotten in the way of making a few hundred cards several
    times over. If I just wanted mass quantities, I could simply do it up
    in FM and send the PDF to the print shop. It's pretty cheap. Instead,
    I want to find a replacement for my current method, which is small
    batches of constantly evolving cards, done on expensive Avery precut
    cards by an outfit with access to a laser printer. It is too
    expensive to simply choose any old way and "just do it" to find out
    whether it works. Doing small batches at the local copy shop is
    prohibitively expensive and would not give me the quick turnaround
    time of doing it at home.

    Another example of expense is the paper cutter; in my town, they cost
    anywhere between $20 and $120. Which one to buy? Would the smaller
    ones break down after a few weeks of thick paper? Are they so flimsy
    that they leave unsharp edges? The size is also important, as I will
    have a hard time finding space to store the bigger leaver-based
    cutters in my apartment, even though they look like they are heftier.
    Will the leaver design cause the paper to move as you cut, like the
    big ones at school? Even assuming the store takes back an unsuitable
    cutter, it takes time to constantly commute to the retail outlet to
    try different models until I get the right one (and I'm sure it
    wouldn't make them happy). Contrary to the impression I get from your
    reply, the suggestions presented in this newsgroup represent valuable,
    much-needed information e.g. cutter manufacturer and clues to its
    model, as well as the alternative of using a sharp exacto-knife and
    steel straight edge. Experimentation shows that it works like a
    charm, circumvents uncertainties with the cutters. The whole point of
    asking for this information was to *not* reinvent the wheel -- others
    have been down this road before.

    Aside from the cutter, I'm still answering the question of whether my
    inkjet can print good enough. If it isn't good enough, I still have
    to use Avery cards. The inkjet prints fine on 20 lb paper, but smears
    on 110 lb paper. Good thing I didn't "just do it" by buying an entire
    batch of that paper. As an alternative, I was given "card stock" to
    try, which was described as approximately 90 lb -- it is actually 65
    lb, and seems flimsy. How much does it matter? Subjectively, it
    seems to make a difference to me. Do they have intermediate weights
    that they can sell me several sheets of so that I can try them before
    purchasing a whole package? More commuting, but if they have other
    weights, I will purchase several sheets of each weight to avoid having
    to go back so often. The goal is to get the heaviest weight that
    won't smear.

    As you can see, when one does this at home for the first time, it is
    not just a matter of belting out large quantities on the first try.
    I've done that using the local print shop, before realizing that my
    needs were different. I now have a backlog of various drafts of my
    calling card, which I no longer wish to use since the format and
    content has evolved significantly with greater knowledge. Once I get
    a method which works for my circumstance, though, I certainly will
    belt them out without too much thought. And I will have no qualms
    about saving people some trouble by sharing what I've learned. Since
    this thread has been captured by google forever, however, there is
    probably no need to worry about that.
  28. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Burt wrote:
    > The MS word
    > or Wordperfect avery business card templates have a know waste margin on all
    > sides and are abutted with no waste between them. With any papercutter that
    > has a decent measuring device or guide on it you don't need the cut marks.
    > Simply use the ruler guide to cut off the waste all the way around and then
    > use the guide to cut the cards apart. After you cut the first few sheets
    > you will not even have to think the measurements through. If you are off by
    > a hair it really doesn't matter.

    Oh, yeah, thanks for this. The reason why I like cut marks is that I have an
    inherent distrust of the repeatability of absolute print positioning. Not sure
    where it comes from, though it was mentioned a bit earlier in this group that
    some printers can vary in positioning by (one? several?) millimeters. Even if
    this is the variation between different printers of the same model, it means
    you have to fine tune the positioning on the soft copy to tailor it for a specific
    printer. But if I do end up using cut lines, I will be keeping an eye out to see
    the accuracy of absolute positioning on the hard copy. If it is good, then I will
    use your idea of forgoing the cut lines and simply rely on measuring the cut for
    the hard copy.
  29. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Ben Myers wrote:
    > I bought a nice sharp paper cutter from Quill a number of years ago. I can lay
    > out 12 cards of 2"x3 1/2" dimensions in landscape on a single 8 1/2" x 11" piece
    > of paper. Do the math and that leaves 1/4" to trim off all sides... Ben Myers

    Thanks for the info, Ben. Our local major office equipment &
    stationary store is Stapes/Business Depot. They seem to cater to
    Fiskars and X-Acto. If I go this route, probably better to choose
    from the store rather than trying to track down another brand name
    in town.

    "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote:
    >
    > 3. Print & cut by shop
    > ----------------------
    > * $1.25/page (laser printed)
    > * $1.00 overhead to extract 10-up content from PDF file
    > - This is understandable. I spent a while just fiddling around
    > to find proper layout, which differed on the printed page
    > versus on-screen PDF (turned out to be a printer setting)
    > - Assuming 3 page/order, this adds 0.33/page
    > * $1.00/page to cut
    > * Total: $2.58/page, clean laser quality

    I just spoke to a copy shop staff member, who corrected some of the
    above figures I got earlier this week. The cutting charge is not $1/page.
    It is $1/cut. In a 10-up layout, this would be 6 horizontal cuts and 3
    vertical cuts. Basically, $9 to cut up a 10-up layout. However, this
    $9 includes as many sheets of the 10-up business card per layout. For
    small batches such as mine, that doesn't amortize well, so the $2.58/page
    cost goes up to about $4.58/page (exactly the same as doing it at the
    on-campus printing shop). All the more reason to do it at home.
  30. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote in message
    news:42eda62b$1_3@x-privat.org...
    > Ben Myers wrote:
    >> Hammermill "Signs and Notices" 54 lb stock is plenty heavy for my use.
    >> ... Ben Myers
    >
    >
    > The cardstock I got is 65 lb. Seems flimsy. Not that it necessarily
    > matters. The only thing that matters is how it comes across to the
    > person receiving it. I can only guess what what that may be based on
    > my own impression. Now I have your impression as a "data point" too.
    > Thanks.

    Have you tried Wasau 80# cover? works fine in my printers.
  31. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Burt wrote:
    > "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote in message
    > news:42eda62b$1_3@x-privat.org...
    >
    >>Ben Myers wrote:
    >>
    >>>Hammermill "Signs and Notices" 54 lb stock is plenty heavy for my use.
    >>>... Ben Myers
    >>
    >>
    >>The cardstock I got is 65 lb. Seems flimsy. Not that it necessarily
    >>matters. The only thing that matters is how it comes across to the
    >>person receiving it. I can only guess what what that may be based on
    >>my own impression. Now I have your impression as a "data point" too.
    >>Thanks.
    >
    > Have you tried Wasau 80# cover? works fine in my printers.

    Mines is an HP PSC 750 inkjet. I will see if the copy shop have other
    weights that they can sell sample quantities of. I thought the sheets
    of "card stock" they sold me today was 90 lb (that's what they said).
    But it was so flimsy, even as a 3.5"x2" card, that I googled "card stock";
    I found that it is actually 65 lb. If necessary, I'll phone around to
    various copy shops to see if they have demo cards of various weight so
    that I can just drop by see which one that seems reasonably sturdy.
    Many stores are closed tomorrow, though, due to the holiday.
  32. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Burt wrote:

    >"Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote in message
    >news:42e5399e$1_1@x-privat.org...
    >
    >
    >>I would like to make up calling cards at home using 8.5x11 sheets of
    >>Avery precut cards. Templates are provided for Word & Word Perfect.
    >>
    >>1. How well do people find the translation of the templates to
    >>Framemaker? Is the positioning of the business cards correctly
    >>preserved?
    >>
    >>2. I'm using an HP inkjet to print (PSC 750). I haven't calibrated
    >>the print heads because it requires that all the color cartridges be
    >>working. I haven't replaced the depleted color cartridges because I
    >>don't expect to use them. Does anyone have experience with how accurate
    >>is the positioning of the printout without this calibration? This is
    >>more critical when printing out on precut cards than when printing out
    >>normally.
    >>
    >>
    >
    >I'm not sure what benefit you derive by reinventing the wheel. The MS word
    >or Wordperfect avery business card templates have a know waste margin on all
    >sides and are abutted with no waste between them. With any papercutter that
    >has a decent measuring device or guide on it you don't need the cut marks.
    >Simply use the ruler guide to cut off the waste all the way around and then
    >use the guide to cut the cards apart. After you cut the first few sheets
    >you will not even have to think the measurements through. If you are off by
    >a hair it really doesn't matter. No one is going to hold one card next to
    >the other to be certain that you cut them absolutely perfectly. Very, very,
    >very close is good enough. You can incorporate graphics by importing them
    >if you wish. If you want something other than straight text you can compose
    >a file in photoshop or any other program that can manipulate text, save the
    >file, and import it into the Word or WP page once the format is set to the
    >avery business card template. It can be resized, moved, and copied mulitple
    >times to fill out all the slots in the template. Very short learning curve
    >in either program.
    >
    >I don't mean to appear mean-spirited
    >

    Why don't you recognize what you are.

    >when I say that by the time you have
    >thought the problem through, communicated with several very well meaning
    >and capable people on this NG, and gone back to the computer to put all this
    >newfound knowledge to work, you could have printed and cut a few hundred
    >cards, several times over! Of course, this discounts the intellectual
    >challange to do it in a different manner with other software, and I do
    >recognize the pleasure of figuring out something yourself rather than
    >following a well-worn, beaten path. For many of us the journey is as
    >important as reaching the destination.
    >
    >
    >
    >
  33. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    measekite wrote:

    > Why don't you recognize what you are.

    You stupid fool! People have been asking that very question of you for
    months now.
    Frank
  34. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Frank wrote:

    > measekite wrote:
    >
    >> Why don't you recognize what you are.
    >
    >
    > You stupid fool! People have been asking that very question of you for
    > months now.
    > Frank
  35. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    In article <42edbdcb_2@x-privat.org>,
    "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote:

    > Not sure
    > where it comes from, though it was mentioned a bit earlier in this group that
    > some printers can vary in positioning by (one? several?) millimeters. Even if
    > this is the variation between different printers of the same model ...

    It is even worse, it can vary by millimeters from sheet to sheet on the
    same printer - because of the paper feed that is not precise (even in
    more expensive printers).

    This is the reason why you'll find registration marks (features that
    match from the front and the backside) on bank notes - matching to 0.01
    mm - this is something difficult to replicate on ordinary printine
    machines even.

    HTH

    Marc

    --
    Switzerland/Europe
    <http://www.heusser.com>
    remove CHEERS and from MERCIAL to get valid e-mail
  36. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Marc Heusser wrote:
    > In article <42edbdcb_2@x-privat.org>,
    > "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote:
    >>...it was mentioned a bit earlier in this group that
    >>some printers can vary in positioning by (one? several?) millimeters. Even if
    >>this is the variation between different printers of the same model ...
    >
    > It is even worse, it can vary by millimeters from sheet to sheet on the
    > same printer - because of the paper feed that is not precise (even in
    > more expensive printers).
    > This is the reason why you'll find registration marks (features that
    > match from the front and the backside) on bank notes - matching to 0.01
    > mm - this is something difficult to replicate on ordinary printine
    > machines even. HTH Marc

    Thanks for clarifying. If it varies that much from sheet to sheet on the same
    printer, I certainly won't be able to use the idea of registration marks on the
    back side, since I have to feed the paper in again to print on the back side.
    I just printed out 3 copies of a page of orthonormal crosses ("+" symbols drawn
    at the corners and the center). 2 of them match perfectly, the 3rd one is offset
    both vertically and horizontally by the better part of a millimeter. I'm sure that
    if one were to make a study of this (and HP probably already has the data), there
    would be a normal distribution where a standard deviations would be in the order of
    a millimeter. Or more -- remember that the "measurement" I made above is with the
    copies made one after another. With time, physical "calibration" of the position
    probably varies (maybe as parts expand/shrink with temperature, etc.).
  37. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Marc Heusser wrote:
    > [print positioning] can vary by millimeters from sheet to sheet on
    > the same printer - because of the paper feed that is not precise
    > (even in more expensive printers). This is the reason why you'll
    > find registration marks (features that match from the front and the
    > backside) on bank notes - matching to 0.01 mm - this is something
    > difficult to replicate on ordinary printine machines even.

    Anonymous, Kinda wrote:
    > Thanks for clarifying. If it varies that much from sheet to sheet
    > on the same printer, I certainly won't be able to use the idea of
    > registration marks on the back side, since I have to feed the paper
    > in again to print on the back side. I just printed out 3 copies of
    > a page of orthonormal crosses ("+" symbols drawn at the corners and
    > the center). 2 of them match perfectly, the 3rd one is offset both
    > vertically and horizontally by the better part of a millimeter. I'm
    > sure that if one were to make a study of this (and HP probably
    > already has the data), there would be a normal distribution where a
    > standard deviations would be in the order of a millimeter. Or more
    > -- remember that the "measurement" I made above is with the copies
    > made one after another. With time, physical "calibration" of the
    > position probably varies (maybe as parts expand/shrink with
    > temperature, etc.).

    By the way, would you have any idea on how to print cut marks to cut
    abutted 10-up cards? (I realize that 12-up is possible, but that's
    the next step). From elsewhere in this thread:

    > I'm having trouble envisioning where you might put these cut marks
    > so that they don't actually run along the edges of the cut...cards.
    > The only way I can see that happening is if the cards are not
    > abutted...If so, I can come up with a pattern of cut marks, but it
    > allows fewer cards per sheet then abutted cards. The waste paper
    > surrounding each card will also be slim, but that might not be a
    > problem.
    >
    > If the cards *are* abutted -- say 10-up, in 2 columns of 5 -- then
    > one might leave cut marks at the margins surrounding the 10-card
    > aggretate. But the moment you make a cut, some of the cut pieces
    > will be missing cut marks either at the starting or ending points of
    > the cut.
    >
    > For abutted cards, I can deal with the problem of missing cut marks
    > in the margins by projecting the cut marks into the 10-card
    > aggregate (along the edges of the individual cards), but this
    > creates an erratic shadow along the edge of each card.
  38. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote in message
    news:42edbabc_2@x-privat.org...
    > Burt wrote:
    >> "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote in message
    >> news:42eda62b$1_3@x-privat.org...
    >>
    >>>Ben Myers wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Hammermill "Signs and Notices" 54 lb stock is plenty heavy for my use.
    >>>>... Ben Myers
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>The cardstock I got is 65 lb. Seems flimsy. Not that it necessarily
    >>>matters. The only thing that matters is how it comes across to the
    >>>person receiving it. I can only guess what what that may be based on
    >>>my own impression. Now I have your impression as a "data point" too.
    >>>Thanks.
    >>
    >> Have you tried Wasau 80# cover? works fine in my printers.
    >
    > Mines is an HP PSC 750 inkjet. I will see if the copy shop have other
    > weights that they can sell sample quantities of. I thought the sheets
    > of "card stock" they sold me today was 90 lb (that's what they said).
    > But it was so flimsy, even as a 3.5"x2" card, that I googled "card stock";
    > I found that it is actually 65 lb. If necessary, I'll phone around to
    > various copy shops to see if they have demo cards of various weight so
    > that I can just drop by see which one that seems reasonably sturdy.
    > Many stores are closed tomorrow, though, due to the holiday.

    What I've found, being a novice in the paper area, is that different types
    of stock have a different level of stiffness and feel for equivalent
    "weight" - i.e. 80 lb. The Wasau 80# COVER was a decent weight for cards in
    my estimation. In San Francisco you can go to Kelly paper company, a firm
    that sells primarily to printers, and buy a few sheets of any paper they
    have as samples to try. I don't know what firms there are in your area, but
    generally speaking, stores like office depot and some of the copy shops have
    a fairly limited selection. The printing industry and the companies that
    cater to them have a very broad selection.
  39. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote in message
    news:42edb86c_1@x-privat.org...
    > Burt wrote:
    (snip)

    > As you can see, when one does this at home for the first time, it is
    > not just a matter of belting out large quantities on the first try.
    > I've done that using the local print shop, before realizing that my
    > needs were different. I now have a backlog of various drafts of my
    > calling card, which I no longer wish to use since the format and
    > content has evolved significantly with greater knowledge. Once I get
    > a method which works for my circumstance, though, I certainly will
    > belt them out without too much thought. And I will have no qualms
    > about saving people some trouble by sharing what I've learned. Since
    > this thread has been captured by google forever, however, there is
    > probably no need to worry about that.

    I do appreciate the problem solving issues you have noted. I also do very
    small quantities of business cards at a time so they can be changed as
    needed. I do them on an old HP5p laser and, because of the thickness of the
    card stock, I have to feed it through one sheet at a time and slightly force
    it into the feed pickup, but it works great. This printer has a nearly
    straight paper path when using the drop-down paper feed area and opening a
    rear paper exit tray. I'm blessed with more space than you apparently have.
    My paper cutter is an 11 inch guillotine model that I've had for 40 years
    from working in my darkroom. I've found that it cuts straight as long as I
    hold the paper stock down firmly. It has been used extensively but still
    has a very sharp blade that makes a clean cut. The blade is spring loaded
    and can be adjusted. It was not an expensive unit when I bought it at a
    photo supply firm, but I don't have a clue as to what it would cost now.
  40. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Burt wrote:

    >"Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote in message
    >news:42edbabc_2@x-privat.org...
    >
    >
    >>Burt wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>"Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote in message
    >>>news:42eda62b$1_3@x-privat.org...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Ben Myers wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>Hammermill "Signs and Notices" 54 lb stock is plenty heavy for my use.
    >>>>>... Ben Myers
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>The cardstock I got is 65 lb. Seems flimsy. Not that it necessarily
    >>>>matters. The only thing that matters is how it comes across to the
    >>>>person receiving it. I can only guess what what that may be based on
    >>>>my own impression. Now I have your impression as a "data point" too.
    >>>>Thanks.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>Have you tried Wasau 80# cover? works fine in my printers.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>Mines is an HP PSC 750 inkjet. I will see if the copy shop have other
    >>weights that they can sell sample quantities of. I thought the sheets
    >>of "card stock" they sold me today was 90 lb (that's what they said).
    >>But it was so flimsy, even as a 3.5"x2" card, that I googled "card stock";
    >>I found that it is actually 65 lb. If necessary, I'll phone around to
    >>various copy shops to see if they have demo cards of various weight so
    >>that I can just drop by see which one that seems reasonably sturdy.
    >>Many stores are closed tomorrow, though, due to the holiday.
    >>
    >>
    >
    >What I've found, being a novice in the paper area,
    >

    You are also a novice in the ink area

    >is that different types
    >of stock have a different level of stiffness and feel for equivalent
    >"weight" - i.e. 80 lb. The Wasau 80# COVER was a decent weight for cards in
    >my estimation. In San Francisco you can go to Kelly paper company, a firm
    >that sells primarily to printers, and buy a few sheets of any paper they
    >have as samples to try. I don't know what firms there are in your area, but
    >generally speaking, stores like office depot
    >

    where you can buy OEM ink for your printer

    >and some of the copy shops have
    >a fairly limited selection. The printing industry and the companies that
    >cater to them have a very broad selection.
    >
    >
    >
    >
  41. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    In article <42ee3739_1@x-privat.org>,
    "Anonymous, Kinda" <Anon@nymous.net> wrote:

    > If it varies that much from sheet to sheet on the same
    > printer, I certainly won't be able to use the idea of registration marks on
    > the
    > back side, since I have to feed the paper in again to print on the back side.
    > I just printed out 3 copies of a page of orthonormal crosses ("+" symbols
    > drawn
    > at the corners and the center). 2 of them match perfectly, the 3rd one is
    > offset
    > both vertically and horizontally by the better part of a millimeter.

    If your card is similar to mine, it needs to be cut precisely on one
    side only, ie only on one side the design is sufficiently close to the
    border so you'll notice the misregistration. On the other side there is
    sufficient clearance. So just put your cutting marks on the critical
    side and you'll be fine.
    BTW: It does not work to cut a bunch of sheets together therefore.

    Marc

    --
    Switzerland/Europe
    <http://www.heusser.com>
    remove CHEERS and from MERCIAL to get valid e-mail
  42. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    "Burt" <sfbjgNOSPAM@pacbell.net> wrote in message
    news:TisHe.8919$_%4.3023@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...
    >
    >
    > What I've found, being a novice in the paper area, is that different
    types
    > of stock have a different level of stiffness and feel for equivalent
    > "weight" - i.e. 80 lb. The Wasau 80# COVER was a decent weight for cards
    in
    > my estimation. In San Francisco you can go to Kelly paper company, a
    firm
    > that sells primarily to printers, and buy a few sheets of any paper they
    > have as samples to try. I don't know what firms there are in your area,
    but
    > generally speaking, stores like office depot and some of the copy shops
    have
    > a fairly limited selection. The printing industry and the companies that
    > cater to them have a very broad selection.
    >
    >

    True ... very true. Your best bet in the USofA would be either Kelly Paper
    Company or Xpedx. Both have local outlets in most major cities, and a
    *much* better selection than any stationary store. Think 100,000 square
    foot warehouse ... full of all kinds of paper products!

    Kelly Paper Company
    http://www.kellypaper.com/

    Xpedx
    http://www.xpedx.com/paper/default.asp
  43. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    RSD99 wrote on Jul 27, 8:24pm
    > For cutting - try adding cut marks to your template and buying an
    > Xacto #11 Frisket Knife and a metal straight edge(S/B ~~ $10.00)
    >
    > For printing - I have made variations of my 'Business Card' on
    > "Kirkland Photo Paper" (10 mil thickness, nice and stiff, bright
    > glossy surface, Costco stock number 26352. $18.99 for 125 sheets ...
    > or about 0.15 per sheet).


    Hi, RSD99,

    I find that using a blade & a straight edge works well with Dave C.'s
    cut marks. I'm cutting on a wooden chopping board. When you do it,
    is there a better surface to use besides wood? That tends to dull the
    blade quickly, which really needs to be sharp to have clean edges.
    Thanks.
  44. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    RSD99 wrote on Jul 27, 8:24pm
    > For cutting - try adding cut marks to your template and buying an
    > Xacto #11 Frisket Knife and a metal straight edge(S/B ~~ $10.00) For
    > printing - I have made variations of my 'Business Card' on "Kirkland
    > Photo Paper" (10 mil thickness, nice and stiff, bright glossy
    > surface, Costco stock number 26352. $18.99 for 125 sheets ... or
    > about 0.15 per sheet).

    gore_butch_...@yahoo.com wrote on Aug 14, 12:17pm:
    > I find that using a blade & a straight edge works well with Dave
    > C.'s cut marks. I'm cutting on a wooden chopping board. When you
    > do it, is there a better surface to use besides wood? That tends to
    > dull the blade quickly, which really needs to be sharp to have clean
    > edges.

    Ben Myers wrote on Aug 14, 1:23pm:
    > I still favor a good solid paper cutter with finely done marking for
    > inches and fractioons plus a rock-steady hand. The paper cutter
    > never needs sharpening and I strengthen my hand lifting cans of
    > beer... Ben Myers

    Solid paper cutter is still an option. I'm just trying this
    lower-cost method first. Seems to work OK. Just wondering if there's
    a better surface to cut on.

    Whenever I try to strengthen my hand by lifting cans of beer, I get a
    beer gut.
  45. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    gore_butch_off@yahoo.com wrote:
    > RSD99 wrote on Jul 27, 8:24pm
    >
    >>For cutting - try adding cut marks to your template and buying an
    >>Xacto #11 Frisket Knife and a metal straight edge(S/B ~~ $10.00) For
    >>printing - I have made variations of my 'Business Card' on "Kirkland
    >>Photo Paper" (10 mil thickness, nice and stiff, bright glossy
    >>surface, Costco stock number 26352. $18.99 for 125 sheets ... or
    >>about 0.15 per sheet).
    >
    >
    > gore_butch_...@yahoo.com wrote on Aug 14, 12:17pm:
    >
    >>I find that using a blade & a straight edge works well with Dave
    >>C.'s cut marks. I'm cutting on a wooden chopping board. When you
    >>do it, is there a better surface to use besides wood? That tends to
    >>dull the blade quickly, which really needs to be sharp to have clean
    >>edges.
    >
    >
    > Ben Myers wrote on Aug 14, 1:23pm:
    >
    >>I still favor a good solid paper cutter with finely done marking for
    >>inches and fractioons plus a rock-steady hand. The paper cutter
    >>never needs sharpening and I strengthen my hand lifting cans of
    >>beer... Ben Myers
    >
    >
    > Solid paper cutter is still an option. I'm just trying this
    > lower-cost method first. Seems to work OK. Just wondering if there's
    > a better surface to cut on.
    >
    > Whenever I try to strengthen my hand by lifting cans of beer, I get a
    > beer gut.
    >
    A rotary matt board may be your best choice for low-cost method. You can
    get them at most craft/hobby stores. They're mostly designed to work
    with rotary cutters, but I think you use a regular straight edge blade.
  46. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    I still favor a good solid paper cutter with finely done marking for inches and
    fractioons plus a rock-steady hand. The paper cutter never needs sharpening
    and I strengthen my hand lifting cans of beer... Ben Myers

    On 14 Aug 2005 09:17:53 -0700, gore_butch_off@yahoo.com wrote:

    >RSD99 wrote on Jul 27, 8:24pm
    >> For cutting - try adding cut marks to your template and buying an
    >> Xacto #11 Frisket Knife and a metal straight edge(S/B ~~ $10.00)
    >>
    >> For printing - I have made variations of my 'Business Card' on
    >> "Kirkland Photo Paper" (10 mil thickness, nice and stiff, bright
    >> glossy surface, Costco stock number 26352. $18.99 for 125 sheets ...
    >> or about 0.15 per sheet).
    >
    >
    >Hi, RSD99,
    >
    >I find that using a blade & a straight edge works well with Dave C.'s
    >cut marks. I'm cutting on a wooden chopping board. When you do it,
    >is there a better surface to use besides wood? That tends to dull the
    >blade quickly, which really needs to be sharp to have clean edges.
    >Thanks.
    >
  47. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    On 14 Aug 2005 09:17:53 -0700, gore_butch_off@yahoo.com wrote:

    >I find that using a blade & a straight edge works well with Dave C.'s
    >cut marks. I'm cutting on a wooden chopping board. When you do it,
    >is there a better surface to use besides wood? That tends to dull the
    >blade quickly, which really needs to be sharp to have clean edges.
    >Thanks.

    A plastic cutting board from stationery or art supply shops is
    designed for this exactly.
  48. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    "Alan" <none@none.com> wrote in message
    news:1124045825.b68cef508e268ff45667540103712ebe@teranews...
    > On 14 Aug 2005 09:17:53 -0700, gore_butch_off@yahoo.com wrote:
    >
    > >I find that using a blade & a straight edge works well with Dave C.'s
    > >cut marks. I'm cutting on a wooden chopping board. When you do it,
    > >is there a better surface to use besides wood? That tends to dull the
    > >blade quickly, which really needs to be sharp to have clean edges.
    > >Thanks.
    >
    > A plastic cutting board from stationery or art supply shops is
    > designed for this exactly.
    >

    Bingo ... I've got several of them ... they're less than US$10 each.
  49. Archived from groups: comp.text.frame,comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Elizabeth wrote:
    > gore_butch_off@yahoo.com wrote:
    > >I find that using a blade & a straight edge works well with Dave
    > >C.'s cut marks. I'm cutting on a wooden chopping board. When you
    > >do it, is there a better surface to use besides wood? That tends to
    > >dull the blade quickly, which really needs to be sharp to have clean
    > >edges.
    >
    > A rotary matt board may be your best choice for low-cost method. You can
    > get them at most craft/hobby stores. They're mostly designed to work
    > with rotary cutters, but I think you use a regular straight edge blade.

    Yes, I talked to an arts supply store, and they recommended The
    Cutting Mat, imported by Selectum. "A semi-hard rubber -like surface
    which allows the cutter to bite into it; yet the cut will miraculously
    heal, almost as soon as it is made."

    Thanks.
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