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Router on and off?

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Anonymous
December 12, 2004 8:51:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

My DSL modem and router both had instructions to leave them on for
at least a couple of weeks after initial set-up. After that period
passed, I started turning off my DSL modem when I'm asleep (it makes a
faint buzzing that annoys) or away from home. Can this cause any
problems?
Emanuel
--
1983 Porsche 911 Guards Red/Black
1983 Porsche 944 Guards Red/Black
1983 Porsche 928 Guards Red/Black

More about : router

Anonymous
December 12, 2004 8:51:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"E Brown" <epbrown01@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
news:cqvor0hklh4kjopn0f07q1cdtk72t2upul@4ax.com...
> My DSL modem and router both had instructions to leave them on for
> at least a couple of weeks after initial set-up. After that period
> passed, I started turning off my DSL modem when I'm asleep (it makes
a
> faint buzzing that annoys) or away from home. Can this cause any
> problems?
> Emanuel
> --
> 1983 Porsche 911 Guards Red/Black
> 1983 Porsche 944 Guards Red/Black
> 1983 Porsche 928 Guards Red/Black

Its probably OK to do that, but most electronic failures occur at the
point of powering up...
during the initial power surge.
I do the same with my AP when not using wireless. I wouldnt lose any
sleep over it
so I would turn it off.
Anonymous
December 12, 2004 8:51:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 17:51:28 GMT, E Brown <epbrown01@worldnet.att.net>
wrote:

> My DSL modem and router both had instructions to leave them on for
>at least a couple of weeks after initial set-up. After that period
>passed, I started turning off my DSL modem when I'm asleep (it makes a
>faint buzzing that annoys) or away from home. Can this cause any
>problems?
> Emanuel

No problems. You must have SBC/Ameritech/AT&T DSL. The reason they
want you to leave the modem on for 10 days is that they test the
performance and reliability of the line and modem during this period.
If there's a problem, they slow down the speed (throttle) the
connection speed until the error rate is reasonable. If you turn off
the modem during this test period, there's a good chance that the
software will decided that you have a flakey line and therefore
unworthy of getting the full speed that you're paying for. This why
SBC advertises a range of download speeds instead of a single speed.
After 10 days, do whatever you want as they don't retest.
Incidentally, the faint buzz from your unspecified DSL modem or
unspecified router is coming from the switching power supply coil or
transformer. This is a known problem with some models (I forgot
which).
http://www.practicallynetworked.com/support/hissing.htm

http://groups-beta.google.com/group/alt.internet.wirele...

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
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Anonymous
December 12, 2004 9:03:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

In news:cqvor0hklh4kjopn0f07q1cdtk72t2upul@4ax.com E Brown
<epbrown01@worldnet.att.net> wrote:

> My DSL modem and router both had instructions to leave them on for
> at least a couple of weeks after initial set-up.

Gee ... never heard of that before.

> After that period passed, I started turning off my DSL modem when I'm
> asleep (it makes a faint buzzing that annoys) or away from home. Can
> this cause any problems

I always turn mine off when I'm not using it. I did this with my old Cisco
675 & 678 and my current Actiontec GT701.

During the summer, I not only turn it off, I unplug it both from the
power supply and the phone jack to avoid damage from lightning.

--
Bert Hyman St. Paul, MN bert@visi.com
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 10:53:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 15:43:18 -0800, Jeff Liebermann
<jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:

>No problems. You must have SBC/Ameritech/AT&T DSL. The reason they
>want you to leave the modem on for 10 days is that they test the
>performance and reliability of the line and modem during this period.

Thanks, I do have SBC. I've got some old modem, from the look of
it, but don't recall the model. If I didn't already have the D-Link,
I'd buy a 2nd-hand wifi modem - I seem them around for $80 or so now.
My current set-up works and if it ain't broke...
Emanuel
--
1983 Porsche 911 Guards Red/Black
1983 Porsche 944 Guards Red/Black
1983 Porsche 928 Guards Red/Black
December 13, 2004 11:19:35 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 15:43:18 -0800, Jeff Liebermann
<jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:

>On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 17:51:28 GMT, E Brown <epbrown01@worldnet.att.net>
>wrote:
>
>> My DSL modem and router both had instructions to leave them on for
>>at least a couple of weeks after initial set-up. After that period
>>passed, I started turning off my DSL modem when I'm asleep (it makes a
>>faint buzzing that annoys) or away from home. Can this cause any
>>problems?
>> Emanuel
>
>No problems. You must have SBC/Ameritech/AT&T DSL. The reason they
>want you to leave the modem on for 10 days is that they test the
>performance and reliability of the line and modem during this period.
>If there's a problem, they slow down the speed (throttle) the
>connection speed until the error rate is reasonable. If you turn off
>the modem during this test period, there's a good chance that the
>software will decided that you have a flakey line and therefore
>unworthy of getting the full speed that you're paying for. This why
>SBC advertises a range of download speeds instead of a single speed.
>After 10 days, do whatever you want as they don't retest.
>Incidentally, the faint buzz from your unspecified DSL modem or
>unspecified router is coming from the switching power supply coil or
>transformer. This is a known problem with some models (I forgot
>which).
> http://www.practicallynetworked.com/support/hissing.htm
>
>http://groups-beta.google.com/group/alt.internet.wirele...

I love seeing guys who appear to know of what they speak. I'll keep
you in mind:) 
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 11:41:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 07:53:04 GMT, E Brown <epbrown01@worldnet.att.net>
wrote:

>On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 15:43:18 -0800, Jeff Liebermann
><jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
>>No problems. You must have SBC/Ameritech/AT&T DSL. The reason they
>>want you to leave the modem on for 10 days is that they test the
>>performance and reliability of the line and modem during this period.

> Thanks, I do have SBC. I've got some old modem, from the look of
>it, but don't recall the model. If I didn't already have the D-Link,
>I'd buy a 2nd-hand wifi modem - I seem them around for $80 or so now.
>My current set-up works and if it ain't broke...
> Emanuel

SBC didn't start using the messy red "10 day" sticker until about 2
years ago when they switched from Alcatel to Efficient modems. It's
probably an Efficient 5100B which is not ancient, works quite nicely,
but is somewhat crippled in diagnostics.

I would strongly suggest you *NOT* purchase an all in one box (DSL
modem, router, and wireless). Each box wants to be located somewhere
else. The DSL modem wants to live near the demarc (MPOE) to keep the
interior wiring to a minimum. The router wants to live on the floor
where all the CAT5 wires come together. The wireless wants to live up
high on a bookshelf for better coverage. Seperate boxes also allow
you some versatility in replacing parts and pieces, such as adding a
VPN terminating router, latest wireless standards (802.11i), or
switching from DSL to cable. Were it an all in one box, you would
need to toss everything and start over. Also, seperate boxes are
easier to troubleshoot by replacement when something goes wrong, goes
wrong, goes wrong, goes wrong, goes wrong...

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 11:47:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 08:19:35 GMT, avalanche
<bradleesnow@scratchyahoothis.com> wrote:

>I love seeing guys who appear to know of what they speak. I'll keep
>you in mind:) 

Please don't do that. That usually results in email where I get to
solve someones individual problems. To retain what's left of my
sanity and support my decadent and lavish lifestyle, I treat personal
email as consulting and charge for my guesswork. If you want it free,
post your questions or problems on usenet, where everyone can learn
from the exchange, and where others can catch my screwups and offer
better solutions. If you want it via email, be prepared to pay my
exhorbitant consulting rates.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 9:37:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Jeff Liebermann Wrote:
>
> I would strongly suggest you *NOT* purchase an all in one box (DSL
> modem, router, and wireless). Each box wants to be located somewhere
> else. The DSL modem wants to live near the demarc (MPOE) to keep the
> interior wiring to a minimum. The router wants to live on the floor
> where all the CAT5 wires come together. The wireless wants to live up
> high on a bookshelf for better coverage.
> -------------------------------
>
> Does anyone see his home or small office system in that description?
> Ok, some do, but far more likely your wireless router sits atop your
> DSL modem, and the two are within 6' of a telco jack.
>
> The manufacturers have been interested only in selling separate wifi
> routers and modems. That's just good business. But that may change.
> There aren't many low price wifi ADSL modem/router combos to be found
> through Google. There are a few available overseas (only), but now at
> least one is sold for use in the US.
>
> Buffalo Technology is making the WYR-G54 ADSL wireless modem/router.
> Don't know anything about it yet except what BT's web site says. Anyone
> had any experience with it? The specs suggest it's even compatible with
> an Apple Airport Extreme wifi card.
>
> I need to set up DSL in a vacation home later this month and this
> product, which discounts for $54 at an online store, appears to be the
> most economic answer. Compatibility with the DSL provider is another
> unknown.
>
> There's probably no way to avoid paying BellSouth or Speakeasy the
> required $99 for, typically, a reconditioned $40 modem, but that
> doesn't mean we have to use it.


--
Rey Barry
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