Resolutions

If u have an hd monitor, but u cant run the game at the same hd res because ud rathet max out the graphical details, will running it at a lower res make it look terrible since the monitor isnt made for that res
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More about resolutions
  1. While graphics will not extremely sharp, there should not be much loss in quality as long as the lower resolution is not too low.

    Here are some close up shots of the game Anno 1404 on an Acer S243HLbmii.

    1920x1080



    1680x1050



    1440x900



    1280x720
  2. It depends on how much lower you are going, if you are going from 1080p 1920x1080 to 720p 1280x720, then the difference in clarity is pretty drastic. The other resolutions jaguar listed should be ok to run as long as you dont mind the different ratio. 1600x900 is perty popular to go to.
  3. FlintIronStagg said:
    It depends on how much lower you are going, if you are going from 1080p 1920x1080 to 720p 1280x720, then the difference in clarity is pretty drastic. The other resolutions jaguar listed should be ok to run as long as you dont mind the different ratio. 1600x900 is perty popular to go to.

    Well right now I dont have an hd monitor, so what should be my res?
  4. Do you mean you have a CRT monitor? If so, what aspect ratio is it. The aspect ratio plays a big part on what the best resolutions for you are.
  5. if its an lcd it will look pretty bad at anything other than the native resolution.

    especially since you most likely sitting close and playing games with lots of detail.
  6. bystander said:
    Do you mean you have a CRT monitor? If so, what aspect ratio is it. The aspect ratio plays a big part on what the best resolutions for you are.

    I have no clue what crt or aspect ratio is. Sorry.
  7. Does your monitor look like an old style TV, where it's about a foot (30 cm) or more deep? Also, what is it's native resolution, or recommended resolution?
  8. crt means cathod ray tube. like an old tv.. aspect ratio is the ratio between the horizontal and vertical size of the screen...
    if the screen is say 23inch wide screen and has a rezilution of 1600 by 900 it has an aspect ratio of 16/9 same as 1920/1080 a 1920/1200 has an aspect ratio of 16/10..
    if its a 1280x1024 then it has an aspect ratio of 5/4 which means the screen is exactly 1 5th larger horizontally than it is vertically,,,
    as a general rule its best to run lcd monitors at there native rez as it puts undue stress on the liquid crystals other wise. if you run a game at a lowe rez than the monitor recommend you can sometimes forgo anti-aliasing as some monitors upscale the image (stretch to fit the screen) which can blur the pixels slightly giving the effect of FSAA...
  9. nocturnal7x said:
    if its an lcd it will look pretty bad at anything other than the native resolution.

    especially since you most likely sitting close and playing games with lots of detail.



    The pictures I posted are close up shots from a 1920 x 1080 resolution monitor LCD monitor at varying resolutions. The graphics are not as bad as you say them to be which means you really do not know what you are talking about.
  10. jaguarskx said:
    The pictures I posted are close up shots from a 1920 x 1080 resolution monitor LCD monitor at varying resolutions. The graphics are not as bad as you say them to be which means you really do not know what you are talking about.


    To be fair, screenshots won't show any defects at all if you are viewing them on a monitor using it's native resolution. The picture and image is not the part that gets altered, it's the displaying of it on your monitor that does it.
  11. HEXiT said:
    crt means cathod ray tube. like an old tv.. aspect ratio is the ratio between the horizontal and vertical size of the screen...
    if the screen is say 23inch wide screen and has a rezilution of 1600 by 900 it has an aspect ratio of 16/9 same as 1920/1080 a 1920/1200 has an aspect ratio of 16/10..
    if its a 1280x1024 then it has an aspect ratio of 5/4 which means the screen is exactly 1 5th larger horizontally than it is vertically,,,
    as a general rule its best to run lcd monitors at there native rez as it puts undue stress on the liquid crystals other wise. if you run a game at a lowe rez than the monitor recommend you can sometimes forgo anti-aliasing as some monitors upscale the image (stretch to fit the screen) which can blur the pixels slightly giving the effect of FSAA...

    What he said
  12. bystander said:
    To be fair, screenshots won't show any defects at all if you are viewing them on a monitor using it's native resolution. The picture and image is not the part that gets altered, it's the displaying of it on your monitor that does it.

    I completely agree
  13. bystander said:
    Does your monitor look like an old style TV, where it's about a foot (30 cm) or more deep? Also, what is it's native resolution, or recommended resolution?

    Its a 2003 flatscreen, I think lcd, and its a little thicker than modern flatscreens. I'm pretty sure its lcd because when I run my hand on the screen it blobs. Not sure what res
  14. Right click your desktop background and choose your resolution settings. that will help you out in determining the max output for your monitor
  15. bystander said:
    To be fair, screenshots won't show any defects at all if you are viewing them on a monitor using it's native resolution. The picture and image is not the part that gets altered, it's the displaying of it on your monitor that does it.


    They are photos not screenshots.
  16. jaguarskx said:
    They are photos not screenshots.


    That's a bit better, though those images are not fullscreen and do not let us zoom on them. And from my understanding, different monitors handle the conversion better than others.
  17. As stated before, those are close up photos so they are already "zoomed in". Different model monitors can handle interpolation differently. However, the Acer S243HLbmii is your average cheap 2ms response time TN panel monitor with WLED backlight that most hardcore gamers would buy.
  18. jaguarskx said:
    As stated before, those are close up photos so they are already "zoomed in". Different model monitors can handle interpolation differently. However, the Acer S243HLbmii is your average cheap 2ms response time TN panel monitor with WLED backlight that most hardcore gamers would buy.


    guess you don't understand what he is saying... the images are TOO small to see "details" on them that you would see if you sat infront of the screen and going off resolution on a lcd(led is the same thing just different backlight) monitor usually lowers quality unless you are really lucky, some monitors handle it fairly well where others just look horribly and blurry. and when he wants to zoom in, then he wants to be able to look at the pictures in full size and go in on pixel level to see the detail changes, taking 10 pictures of the same thing in different resolution and then resizing them all to the small images above, then they will all look fairly similar...
  19. As he was said above, I see 0 difference between any of those images. I could not tell a single difference. Between them being small and the conversion of a jpeg, you lose the tiny details.

    Yes, I have a TN monitor, that is because you have no choice what so ever for 120hz. Currently, only TN monitors can do 120hz. It's not some cheap ass monitor, it's a monitor with a purpose.

    That said, it handles the conversion a lot better than previous monitors.
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