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HP-ASUS Kelut 2.02 MB

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Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
July 27, 2005 4:22:33 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

Checked old posts. Didn't see this covered.

I purchased what I was told was an HP barebones unit,
completed by a retailer. Belarc IDs the motherboard as
a "ASUSTek Computer INC. Kelut 2.02." Questions:

1. Is HP still using this motherboard? If not, when did they
start/stop?
2. Is this motherboard similar to any standard ASUS board?

Belarc IDs the unit as:

HP Pavilion 061 PL308AA-ABA a735w 0nB1211RE101KELUT00

Is this a recent unit?

It also has a PHILIPS DVD8421 DVD/CD burner. Is this a current
HP device choice?

Thanks for any help.

knip@cox.net
knippe@gmail.com

More about : asus kelut

Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
July 28, 2005 12:16:34 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

The HP web site identifies the motherboard as ASUS name: A7V8Z-LA. The web
site also identifies the model as a Walmart holiday 2004 system, so it's fairly
new in computer years, where one calendar month equals one computer year, more
or less.

The board is similar to, but not identical to a generic Asus board. You'll need
to check its specs against the specs of boards on the Asus web site.

As to whether or not HP is still using the board and when HP began using it,
only HP can tell you for sure. You could also muck around with all the models
on the HP web site comparing specs, but that's a ton of work.

The Philips drive may have been supplanted by a newer and faster one. DVD
technology is changing rapidly lately... Ben Myers

On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 12:22:33 -0700, "ric" <nospam@home.com> wrote:

>Checked old posts. Didn't see this covered.
>
>I purchased what I was told was an HP barebones unit,
>completed by a retailer. Belarc IDs the motherboard as
>a "ASUSTek Computer INC. Kelut 2.02." Questions:
>
>1. Is HP still using this motherboard? If not, when did they
> start/stop?
>2. Is this motherboard similar to any standard ASUS board?
>
>Belarc IDs the unit as:
>
>HP Pavilion 061 PL308AA-ABA a735w 0nB1211RE101KELUT00
>
>Is this a recent unit?
>
>It also has a PHILIPS DVD8421 DVD/CD burner. Is this a current
>HP device choice?
>
>Thanks for any help.
>
>knip@cox.net
>knippe@gmail.com
>
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
July 28, 2005 4:41:51 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:42e7eaa7.23370186@nntp.charter.net...

> The HP web site identifies the motherboard as ASUS name: A7V8Z-LA.

And the ASUS website shows no -LA variation of the A7V8Z. Closest I
found was an archived model.

> The web
> site also identifies the model as a Walmart holiday 2004 system, so it's
> fairly
> new in computer years, where one calendar month equals one computer year,
> more
> or less.

The identification as "a735w" leads to numerous variations, none of which
match what I have. I guess it is a "barebones" unit that was built up.

Thanks for the reply.
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
July 29, 2005 12:27:40 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

There's not much you can do here. Asus tends not to make information available
on its web site for the exact models delivered to name brand companies like HP.
The information for Pavilions on HP's web site can best be described as
mediocre.

The closest you can come to board specs is to download the documents for another
A7V8Z motherboard, then compare chips soldered on the motherboard for both the
HP variant and generic Asus one. The board is somewhat recent if it was used in
a Walmart holiday 2004 special. Do not even attempt to update the BIOS with a
download from the Asus web site, because there is some chance that the BIOS
update will render the board useless.

Anyu specific technical info you need? ... Ben Myers

On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 12:41:51 -0700, "ric" <nospam@home.com> wrote:

><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
>news:42e7eaa7.23370186@nntp.charter.net...
>
>> The HP web site identifies the motherboard as ASUS name: A7V8Z-LA.
>
>And the ASUS website shows no -LA variation of the A7V8Z. Closest I
>found was an archived model.
>
>> The web
>> site also identifies the model as a Walmart holiday 2004 system, so it's
>> fairly
>> new in computer years, where one calendar month equals one computer year,
>> more
>> or less.
>
>The identification as "a735w" leads to numerous variations, none of which
>match what I have. I guess it is a "barebones" unit that was built up.
>
>Thanks for the reply.
>
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
July 29, 2005 3:24:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:42e93e7a.530129@nntp.charter.net...

> There's not much you can do here. Asus tends not to make information
> available
> on its web site for the exact models delivered to name brand companies
> like HP.
> The information for Pavilions on HP's web site can best be described as
> mediocre.

Well, I was told (by the seller) that it's NOT really a Pavillion. He said
he
gets "bare-bones" units from HP (just case, MB, powersupply) and adds
the CPU, memory, drives, etc.

> The closest you can come to board specs is to download the documents for
> another
> A7V8Z motherboard, then compare chips soldered on the motherboard for both
> the
> HP variant and generic Asus one. The board is somewhat recent if it was
> used in
> a Walmart holiday 2004 special. Do not even attempt to update the BIOS
> with a
> download from the Asus web site, because there is some chance that the
> BIOS
> update will render the board useless.

As I said, I found a similar board in ASUS's archives. But, it ran at a
333 MHz FSB, and this one is 400 MHz. And this one has Phoenix
BIOS. That one didn't.

> Anyu specific technical info you need? ... Ben Myers

Not really. Just trying to figure out exactly what this thing is. I'm
kinda anal that way. <g>
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
July 29, 2005 4:43:22 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

To me, it sounds like your seller misled you. The system IS an HP Pavilion if
it has an HP motherboard, chassis, and power supply. It is an HP Pavilion
because it is subject to the exact technical limitations as the factory original
Pavilion system. Where the rest of the guts come from is incidental.
Everything that the seller put inside are generic parts, same as the generic
ones used by HP's contracted system assembler.

FSB speed is a function of the CPU installed, assuming that the motherboard is
also capable of supporting the same FSB speed.

The comparable Asus board uses an Award BIOS? Award and Phoenix have been part
of the same company for a few years now. HP and just about all the other name
brand computers plus Intel-designed motherboards, all use Phoenix BIOSes. Award
(and AMI) BIOSes now find their way into the non-Intel retail generic
motherboards... Ben Myers

On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 23:24:00 -0700, "ric" <nospam@home.com> wrote:

><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
>news:42e93e7a.530129@nntp.charter.net...
>
>> There's not much you can do here. Asus tends not to make information
>> available
>> on its web site for the exact models delivered to name brand companies
>> like HP.
>> The information for Pavilions on HP's web site can best be described as
>> mediocre.
>
>Well, I was told (by the seller) that it's NOT really a Pavillion. He said
>he
>gets "bare-bones" units from HP (just case, MB, powersupply) and adds
>the CPU, memory, drives, etc.
>
>> The closest you can come to board specs is to download the documents for
>> another
>> A7V8Z motherboard, then compare chips soldered on the motherboard for both
>> the
>> HP variant and generic Asus one. The board is somewhat recent if it was
>> used in
>> a Walmart holiday 2004 special. Do not even attempt to update the BIOS
>> with a
>> download from the Asus web site, because there is some chance that the
>> BIOS
>> update will render the board useless.
>
>As I said, I found a similar board in ASUS's archives. But, it ran at a
>333 MHz FSB, and this one is 400 MHz. And this one has Phoenix
>BIOS. That one didn't.
>
>> Anyu specific technical info you need? ... Ben Myers
>
>Not really. Just trying to figure out exactly what this thing is. I'm
>kinda anal that way. <g>
>
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
July 29, 2005 4:43:23 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:42ea22fc.1452128@nntp.charter.net...

> To me, it sounds like your seller misled you. The system IS an HP
> Pavilion if
> it has an HP motherboard, chassis, and power supply. It is an HP
> Pavilion
> because it is subject to the exact technical limitations as the factory
> original
> Pavilion system. Where the rest of the guts come from is incidental.

I would tend to agree with you. The seller might argue "semantics."
He insisted that the warranty is through him, and *not* through HP.
At this point in time, I'm concerned that this may be a used or returned
system, or have used parts. No real way to tell, is there?

> Everything that the seller put inside are generic parts, same as the
> generic
> ones used by HP's contracted system assembler.

The HD, a WDC WD800BB, comes back as a WD Caviar 7500 RPM
80 GB HD at Western Digital's site.

http://www.westerndigital.com/en/products/Products.asp?...

The DVD/CD burner is listed as a Philips DVD8421.

> FSB speed is a function of the CPU installed, assuming that the
> motherboard is
> also capable of supporting the same FSB speed.

The CPU is a AMD Athlon XP 3000+ running at 2.1 GHz.

Again, the seller *said* that it is 400 MHz FSB. Belarc doesn't list FSB.
Is there a way to check this?

> The comparable Asus board uses an Award BIOS? Award and Phoenix have been
> part
> of the same company for a few years now. HP and just about all the other
> name
> brand computers plus Intel-designed motherboards, all use Phoenix BIOSes.
> Award
> (and AMI) BIOSes now find their way into the non-Intel retail generic
> motherboards... Ben Myers

Can't seem to locate the archive site on the Asus site today. But
I'll figure this out soon. <g>

Thanks again.
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
July 30, 2005 12:34:09 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

On Fri, 29 Jul 2005 12:36:40 -0700, "ric" <nospam@home.com> wrote:
<SNIP>
>I would tend to agree with you. The seller might argue "semantics."
>He insisted that the warranty is through him, and *not* through HP.
>At this point in time, I'm concerned that this may be a used or returned
>system, or have used parts. No real way to tell, is there?

The warranty jolly well better be through him. He sold it to you.

I have sold IBM and Dell systems similar to what you describe, but I tell the
buyer that they are refurbished, which is what they are. I also give my own
one-year warranty, and have had to service exactly one system (hard drive
failure within a week) since I began doing so recently. If the original
computer box is solid and the parts put inside are good quality, then the risk
of a hardware failure under warranty is small.

<SNIP>
>Again, the seller *said* that it is 400 MHz FSB. Belarc doesn't list FSB.
>Is there a way to check this?

Yes. AMD has a speed calibration utility available for download from its web
site. It runs only with AMD CPUs. (Intel has a similar one.) Or download and
run MEMTEST-86, a free memory diagnostic tool with accurate chipset and speed
detection built-in... Ben Myers
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
July 30, 2005 5:13:04 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:42ea9145.8242686@nntp.charter.net...

>>I would tend to agree with you. The seller might argue "semantics."
>>He insisted that the warranty is through him, and *not* through HP.
>>At this point in time, I'm concerned that this may be a used or returned
>>system, or have used parts. No real way to tell, is there?
>
> The warranty jolly well better be through him. He sold it to you.

That's the rub. His warranty is one year. Western Digital has a
three year warranty on their Caviar HDs, but entering my HD
serial number on their site - while correctly identifying the HD -
states that I have NO end user warranty through them. Other
components in the system have longer than one year warranty,
but aren't "end-user" covered in a system. So what happens if
the HD fails after two years? I pay for a new one, but the retailer
gets a free one under warranty from WD? Sweet deal!

> I have sold IBM and Dell systems similar to what you describe, but I tell
> the
> buyer that they are refurbished, which is what they are. I also give my
> own
> one-year warranty, and have had to service exactly one system (hard drive
> failure within a week) since I began doing so recently. If the original
> computer box is solid and the parts put inside are good quality, then the
> risk
> of a hardware failure under warranty is small.

Exactly. The seller gets away with selling "used" components in
a "new" system. Chances of any failures occurring during the one
year warranty period are slim. What a deal.

>>Again, the seller *said* that it is 400 MHz FSB. Belarc doesn't list FSB.
>>Is there a way to check this?
>
> Yes. AMD has a speed calibration utility available for download from its
> web
> site. It runs only with AMD CPUs. (Intel has a similar one.) Or
> download and
> run MEMTEST-86, a free memory diagnostic tool with accurate chipset and
> speed
> detection built-in... Ben Myers

The AMD "CPUinfo" program has no FSB speed info, only a "not
available" notation for system memory Bus speed, and gives BIOS
version KM400-42302e31 rev 3.10. The BIOS shows a 400 MHz
FSB, but that is just the CPU's capability, no?

AMD lists the ASUS A7N8X Deluxe as a 400 MHz FSB board,
and the A7V8X-X as a 333 MHz FSB board. The A7N8X has
the NVIDIA chipset, while the A7V8X has a VIA KT-400 chipset.
This makes me think that the A7V8Z-LA is just a 333 MHz FSB
motherboard, no?

Jeez...this is getting too complicated. <g>
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
July 31, 2005 12:47:06 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

If the BIOS shows that the current SETTING for FSB is 400MHz, then it is 400MHz.

MEMTEST-86 probably will give you a more definitive answer. It seems to be up
to speed on its ability to read out settings from chipsets.

Hey, at least you got a one-year warranty, altho it sounds like the system was
represented to you as new, rather than used. HP's warranty on Pavilion systems
is no more than one year. A dealer (since closed, I wonder why?) around here
would give only a 90-day warranty on any used system he sold.

WD and other drive manufacturers distinguish between retail and OEM drives in
their warranties. Is the WD drive retail or OEM? Think of it this way. If the
drive fails after one year, the replacement cost of a new drive will be less
than $50 by then, given the steady erosion of prices in the computer biz.

.... Ben Myers

On Sat, 30 Jul 2005 13:13:04 -0700, "ric" <nospam@home.com> wrote:

><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
>news:42ea9145.8242686@nntp.charter.net...
>
>>>I would tend to agree with you. The seller might argue "semantics."
>>>He insisted that the warranty is through him, and *not* through HP.
>>>At this point in time, I'm concerned that this may be a used or returned
>>>system, or have used parts. No real way to tell, is there?
>>
>> The warranty jolly well better be through him. He sold it to you.
>
>That's the rub. His warranty is one year. Western Digital has a
>three year warranty on their Caviar HDs, but entering my HD
>serial number on their site - while correctly identifying the HD -
>states that I have NO end user warranty through them. Other
>components in the system have longer than one year warranty,
>but aren't "end-user" covered in a system. So what happens if
>the HD fails after two years? I pay for a new one, but the retailer
>gets a free one under warranty from WD? Sweet deal!
>
>> I have sold IBM and Dell systems similar to what you describe, but I tell
>> the
>> buyer that they are refurbished, which is what they are. I also give my
>> own
>> one-year warranty, and have had to service exactly one system (hard drive
>> failure within a week) since I began doing so recently. If the original
>> computer box is solid and the parts put inside are good quality, then the
>> risk
>> of a hardware failure under warranty is small.
>
>Exactly. The seller gets away with selling "used" components in
>a "new" system. Chances of any failures occurring during the one
>year warranty period are slim. What a deal.
>
>>>Again, the seller *said* that it is 400 MHz FSB. Belarc doesn't list FSB.
>>>Is there a way to check this?
>>
>> Yes. AMD has a speed calibration utility available for download from its
>> web
>> site. It runs only with AMD CPUs. (Intel has a similar one.) Or
>> download and
>> run MEMTEST-86, a free memory diagnostic tool with accurate chipset and
>> speed
>> detection built-in... Ben Myers
>
>The AMD "CPUinfo" program has no FSB speed info, only a "not
>available" notation for system memory Bus speed, and gives BIOS
>version KM400-42302e31 rev 3.10. The BIOS shows a 400 MHz
>FSB, but that is just the CPU's capability, no?
>
>AMD lists the ASUS A7N8X Deluxe as a 400 MHz FSB board,
>and the A7V8X-X as a 333 MHz FSB board. The A7N8X has
>the NVIDIA chipset, while the A7V8X has a VIA KT-400 chipset.
>This makes me think that the A7V8Z-LA is just a 333 MHz FSB
>motherboard, no?
>
>Jeez...this is getting too complicated. <g>
>
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
July 31, 2005 3:14:44 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:42ebe5ea.9483269@nntp.charter.net...

> If the BIOS shows that the current SETTING for FSB is 400MHz, then it is
> 400MHz.

I guess, but...

I ran the Memory Scan at Crucial.com. Very interesting.

1) It recommended DDR PC2700 non-ECC memory. I understand
PC2700 to be 333 MHz.

2) It said 512M of DDR PC3200 non-ECC RAM was installed.
I understand PC3200 to be 400 MHz.

3) Belarc said "Bus Clock" is 200 MHz. At Crucial they say "Many newer
computers use double data rate or "quad-pumped" front side busses.
While the actual front side bus frequency is 200MHz, the enhanced
capability of your computer's front side bus allows it to perform like
a 400MHz or 800MHz front side bus.

I can't get Memtest to download.

Does any of this *really* matter?

> Hey, at least you got a one-year warranty, altho it sounds like the system
> was
> represented to you as new, rather than used. HP's warranty on Pavilion
> systems
> is no more than one year.

Which returns me to the question, what happens when a 3-year warranty
part fails after 2 years in their 1-year warranty systems?

> WD and other drive manufacturers distinguish between retail and OEM drives
> in
> their warranties. Is the WD drive retail or OEM?

Beats me. I entered its S/N in the "end user" section of WD's warranty
wizard,
and it told me it had no end user warranty. I got the S/N from Belarc, not
off
of the drive itself.

Any other utilities I can run?
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
July 31, 2005 4:58:10 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

Read the instructions at the MEMTEST-86 web site. You need to download, then
use the download to prepare either a bootable floppy or bootable CD (depends on
which you download). Boot from the floppy and you will see MEMTEST-86 load up
and run. The top part of the screen shows the particulars of the hardware.

Belarc is fairly reliable. The reported 200MHz bus clock implies 400MHz FSB.

If the three-year warranty part (usually a hard drive) failes after two years,
you are on your own to obtain a replacement. That is the standard industry
practice. The wrinkle in all this has to do with whether or not the part was
purchased as retail or OEM. Replacement of OEM parts under warranty are
typically handled through the system manufacturer, who, of course, will refuse
to service due to the one-year warranty. Buyers of retail parts can contact the
manufacturer direct for warranty replacement. Parts manufactured for use on one
continent will not have their warranties honored from a different continent.

Remove the drive and write down the serial number on the drive itself. Belarc
may or may not have erred. Or else downlaod and run WD's hard drive
diagnostics... Ben Myers

On Sat, 30 Jul 2005 23:14:44 -0700, "ric" <nospam@home.com> wrote:

><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
>news:42ebe5ea.9483269@nntp.charter.net...
>
>> If the BIOS shows that the current SETTING for FSB is 400MHz, then it is
>> 400MHz.
>
>I guess, but...
>
>I ran the Memory Scan at Crucial.com. Very interesting.
>
>1) It recommended DDR PC2700 non-ECC memory. I understand
> PC2700 to be 333 MHz.
>
>2) It said 512M of DDR PC3200 non-ECC RAM was installed.
> I understand PC3200 to be 400 MHz.
>
>3) Belarc said "Bus Clock" is 200 MHz. At Crucial they say "Many newer
> computers use double data rate or "quad-pumped" front side busses.
> While the actual front side bus frequency is 200MHz, the enhanced
> capability of your computer's front side bus allows it to perform like
> a 400MHz or 800MHz front side bus.
>
>I can't get Memtest to download.
>
>Does any of this *really* matter?
>
>> Hey, at least you got a one-year warranty, altho it sounds like the system
>> was
>> represented to you as new, rather than used. HP's warranty on Pavilion
>> systems
>> is no more than one year.
>
>Which returns me to the question, what happens when a 3-year warranty
>part fails after 2 years in their 1-year warranty systems?
>
>> WD and other drive manufacturers distinguish between retail and OEM drives
>> in
>> their warranties. Is the WD drive retail or OEM?
>
>Beats me. I entered its S/N in the "end user" section of WD's warranty
>wizard,
>and it told me it had no end user warranty. I got the S/N from Belarc, not
>off
>of the drive itself.
>
>Any other utilities I can run?
>
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
a b V Motherboard
July 31, 2005 5:29:32 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:42ecc907.2128903@nntp.charter.net...

> Read the instructions at the MEMTEST-86 web site. You need to download,
> then
> use the download to prepare either a bootable floppy or bootable CD
> (depends on
> which you download). Boot from the floppy and you will see MEMTEST-86
> load up
> and run. The top part of the screen shows the particulars of the
> hardware.

Problem was/is that I could not download. I have no blank CD-Rs on
hand now anyway, so it will have to wait.

> Belarc is fairly reliable. The reported 200MHz bus clock implies 400MHz
> FSB.

Yeah, but that leads me to ask why Crucial was recommending
DDR PC2700 RAM. Isn't that 333 MHz?

> If the three-year warranty part (usually a hard drive) failes after two
> years,
> you are on your own to obtain a replacement. That is the standard
> industry
> practice. The wrinkle in all this has to do with whether or not the part
> was
> purchased as retail or OEM. Replacement of OEM parts under warranty are
> typically handled through the system manufacturer, who, of course, will
> refuse
> to service due to the one-year warranty. Buyers of retail parts can
> contact the
> manufacturer direct for warranty replacement. Parts manufactured for use
> on one
> continent will not have their warranties honored from a different
> continent.

When it comes as part of a system, I have to assume it was OEM. That
was my point. The system builder charges for the "non-warranty" (over
one year) replacement, but gets a free drive from WD under the 3-year
HD warranty. Nice setup!

> Remove the drive and write down the serial number on the drive itself.
> Belarc
> may or may not have erred.

Entering the Belar supplied S/N into WD's "warranty wizard" yielded a
correct product description (an 80 GIG Caviar HD) followed by the "no
warranty" news. I am presently in a wheelchair and don't wish to try to
figure out how to open the case. I'm assuming that it is an OEM drive
purchased by either HP or the builder.

On another subject, the DVD/CD burner/player will not read the standard
CD layer of the hybrid SACD I tried. Not unexpected. I wish to make a
copy of the CD layer of this SACD. I have been successful in getting my
home CD player hooked up to the front "audio in" of the computer, and
the SACD now plays through my computer's speakers. But, I can't figure
out if it is possible to get this audio to my computer's CD burner to make
a copy. Ideas??
!