2nd Request: HP NetServer LC II and Windows XP Pro

Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

First request posted 7/20/05.

A client has acquired a used HP NetServer LC II and would like to run
Windows XP Professional on it. Will WinXP Pro run on this machine?

Tnx es 73!
7 answers Last reply
More about request netserver windows
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    I thought I responded to the first request, but I must have been imagining.

    The processor at either 266 or 300 MHz is a little slow for running Windows XP
    Pro. If you can find a 333MHz processor, that would improve things.

    You would need to replace the built-in graphics on the motherboard by installing
    a PCI graphics card supported by Windows. The built-in graphics probably has a
    Cirrus Logic chip and 1MB. There are no XP drivers for any Cirrus chips.

    Max memory is 512MB, consisting of pretty hard to find HP-branded EDO DIMMs, ECC
    I think. I would recommend the max.

    The other chipsets on the motherboard are pretty standard and should be
    supported by XP.

    Still, I think that the possibility of your client being satisfied with XP Pro
    running on the LC II is pretty slim. XP Pro is too much of a pig for older and
    slower computers. Windows 2000 might be a better choice. It is far less
    bloated... Ben Myers

    On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 20:16:02 -0700, Bob Felton <bob123.removethis@fieldtown.net>
    wrote:

    >First request posted 7/20/05.
    >
    >A client has acquired a used HP NetServer LC II and would like to run
    >Windows XP Professional on it. Will WinXP Pro run on this machine?
    >
    >Tnx es 73!
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Maybe you hit the wrong key previously, Ben, and your response went
    into the bit bucket. Anyway, thanks for the informative reply. I
    will do some soul searching with my client over the matter and see
    what he wants to do. Client is a small church. They only want to
    have a "server" to save files to for shared access by other members of
    the church administration. The NetServer was donated by a church
    member, but it came without an OS. I think I have a source of a PIII
    at 500MHz with WinXP that can be donated. That machine should fill
    the bill OK. Thanks, again, Ben.
    --
    Bob


    On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 03:48:23 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    (Ben Myers) wrote:

    >I thought I responded to the first request, but I must have been imagining.
    >
    >The processor at either 266 or 300 MHz is a little slow for running Windows XP
    >Pro. If you can find a 333MHz processor, that would improve things.
    >
    >You would need to replace the built-in graphics on the motherboard by installing
    >a PCI graphics card supported by Windows. The built-in graphics probably has a
    >Cirrus Logic chip and 1MB. There are no XP drivers for any Cirrus chips.
    >
    >Max memory is 512MB, consisting of pretty hard to find HP-branded EDO DIMMs, ECC
    >I think. I would recommend the max.
    >
    >The other chipsets on the motherboard are pretty standard and should be
    >supported by XP.
    >
    >Still, I think that the possibility of your client being satisfied with XP Pro
    >running on the LC II is pretty slim. XP Pro is too much of a pig for older and
    >slower computers. Windows 2000 might be a better choice. It is far less
    >bloated... Ben Myers
    >
    >On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 20:16:02 -0700, Bob Felton <bob123.removethis@fieldtown.net>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>First request posted 7/20/05.
    >>
    >>A client has acquired a used HP NetServer LC II and would like to run
    >>Windows XP Professional on it. Will WinXP Pro run on this machine?
    >>
    >>Tnx es 73!
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    The NetServer LC II would be perfect for saving files for shared access if you
    installed Linux on it. No compatibility problems at all. May even run
    acceptably with as little as 128MB of memory. There are lots of free or nearly
    free and up-to-date versions of Linux available: Red Hat, Mandrake, SUSE (now
    part of Novell), Debian, Ubuntu. Setting up a Linux file server for Windows
    clients is cheap and easy... Ben Myers

    On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 13:29:21 -0700, Bob Felton <bob123.removethis@fieldtown.net>
    wrote:

    >Maybe you hit the wrong key previously, Ben, and your response went
    >into the bit bucket. Anyway, thanks for the informative reply. I
    >will do some soul searching with my client over the matter and see
    >what he wants to do. Client is a small church. They only want to
    >have a "server" to save files to for shared access by other members of
    >the church administration. The NetServer was donated by a church
    >member, but it came without an OS. I think I have a source of a PIII
    >at 500MHz with WinXP that can be donated. That machine should fill
    >the bill OK. Thanks, again, Ben.
    >--
    >Bob
    >
    >
    >
    >On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 03:48:23 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    >(Ben Myers) wrote:
    >
    >>I thought I responded to the first request, but I must have been imagining.
    >>
    >>The processor at either 266 or 300 MHz is a little slow for running Windows XP
    >>Pro. If you can find a 333MHz processor, that would improve things.
    >>
    >>You would need to replace the built-in graphics on the motherboard by installing
    >>a PCI graphics card supported by Windows. The built-in graphics probably has a
    >>Cirrus Logic chip and 1MB. There are no XP drivers for any Cirrus chips.
    >>
    >>Max memory is 512MB, consisting of pretty hard to find HP-branded EDO DIMMs, ECC
    >>I think. I would recommend the max.
    >>
    >>The other chipsets on the motherboard are pretty standard and should be
    >>supported by XP.
    >>
    >>Still, I think that the possibility of your client being satisfied with XP Pro
    >>running on the LC II is pretty slim. XP Pro is too much of a pig for older and
    >>slower computers. Windows 2000 might be a better choice. It is far less
    >>bloated... Ben Myers
    >>
    >>On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 20:16:02 -0700, Bob Felton <bob123.removethis@fieldtown.net>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>First request posted 7/20/05.
    >>>
    >>>A client has acquired a used HP NetServer LC II and would like to run
    >>>Windows XP Professional on it. Will WinXP Pro run on this machine?
    >>>
    >>>Tnx es 73!
    >
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Thanks for the info, Ben. I might just look into that for them.
    --
    Bob


    On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 22:50:40 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    (Ben Myers) wrote:

    >The NetServer LC II would be perfect for saving files for shared access if you
    >installed Linux on it. No compatibility problems at all. May even run
    >acceptably with as little as 128MB of memory. There are lots of free or nearly
    >free and up-to-date versions of Linux available: Red Hat, Mandrake, SUSE (now
    >part of Novell), Debian, Ubuntu. Setting up a Linux file server for Windows
    >clients is cheap and easy... Ben Myers
    >
    >On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 13:29:21 -0700, Bob Felton <bob123.removethis@fieldtown.net>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Maybe you hit the wrong key previously, Ben, and your response went
    >>into the bit bucket. Anyway, thanks for the informative reply. I
    >>will do some soul searching with my client over the matter and see
    >>what he wants to do. Client is a small church. They only want to
    >>have a "server" to save files to for shared access by other members of
    >>the church administration. The NetServer was donated by a church
    >>member, but it came without an OS. I think I have a source of a PIII
    >>at 500MHz with WinXP that can be donated. That machine should fill
    >>the bill OK. Thanks, again, Ben.
    >>--
    >>Bob
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 03:48:23 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    >>(Ben Myers) wrote:
    >>
    >>>I thought I responded to the first request, but I must have been imagining.
    >>>
    >>>The processor at either 266 or 300 MHz is a little slow for running Windows XP
    >>>Pro. If you can find a 333MHz processor, that would improve things.
    >>>
    >>>You would need to replace the built-in graphics on the motherboard by installing
    >>>a PCI graphics card supported by Windows. The built-in graphics probably has a
    >>>Cirrus Logic chip and 1MB. There are no XP drivers for any Cirrus chips.
    >>>
    >>>Max memory is 512MB, consisting of pretty hard to find HP-branded EDO DIMMs, ECC
    >>>I think. I would recommend the max.
    >>>
    >>>The other chipsets on the motherboard are pretty standard and should be
    >>>supported by XP.
    >>>
    >>>Still, I think that the possibility of your client being satisfied with XP Pro
    >>>running on the LC II is pretty slim. XP Pro is too much of a pig for older and
    >>>slower computers. Windows 2000 might be a better choice. It is far less
    >>>bloated... Ben Myers
    >>>
    >>>On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 20:16:02 -0700, Bob Felton <bob123.removethis@fieldtown.net>
    >>>wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>First request posted 7/20/05.
    >>>>
    >>>>A client has acquired a used HP NetServer LC II and would like to run
    >>>>Windows XP Professional on it. Will WinXP Pro run on this machine?
    >>>>
    >>>>Tnx es 73!
    >>
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Good. I am no Linux expert, although I have many years experience in the
    business. I've done some Linux installs, with older Red Hat and current Suse
    (courtesy of Novell). Both were extremely easy. Only one reboot needed,
    compared to the usual Windows reboot-reboot-reboot as different drivers are
    installed. For a system with older hardware, availability of Linux drivers is a
    no-brainer, because the Linux distros carry forward the older drivers.
    Micro$oft is perpetually changing its driver API, rendering old drivers obsolete
    with newer versions of Windows. File and print servers are easy to set up under
    Linux. Exceptions might be some of the newer printer-scanner-copier
    shines-your-shoes kills-warts do-it-all devices, which have very specialized
    drivers and supporting software under Windows... Ben Myers

    On Mon, 01 Aug 2005 20:43:21 -0700, Bob Felton <bob123.removethis@fieldtown.net>
    wrote:

    >Thanks for the info, Ben. I might just look into that for them.
    >--
    >Bob
    >
    >
    >On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 22:50:40 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    >(Ben Myers) wrote:
    >
    >>The NetServer LC II would be perfect for saving files for shared access if you
    >>installed Linux on it. No compatibility problems at all. May even run
    >>acceptably with as little as 128MB of memory. There are lots of free or nearly
    >>free and up-to-date versions of Linux available: Red Hat, Mandrake, SUSE (now
    >>part of Novell), Debian, Ubuntu. Setting up a Linux file server for Windows
    >>clients is cheap and easy... Ben Myers
    >>
    >>On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 13:29:21 -0700, Bob Felton <bob123.removethis@fieldtown.net>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>Maybe you hit the wrong key previously, Ben, and your response went
    >>>into the bit bucket. Anyway, thanks for the informative reply. I
    >>>will do some soul searching with my client over the matter and see
    >>>what he wants to do. Client is a small church. They only want to
    >>>have a "server" to save files to for shared access by other members of
    >>>the church administration. The NetServer was donated by a church
    >>>member, but it came without an OS. I think I have a source of a PIII
    >>>at 500MHz with WinXP that can be donated. That machine should fill
    >>>the bill OK. Thanks, again, Ben.
    >>>--
    >>>Bob
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 03:48:23 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    >>>(Ben Myers) wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I thought I responded to the first request, but I must have been imagining.
    >>>>
    >>>>The processor at either 266 or 300 MHz is a little slow for running Windows XP
    >>>>Pro. If you can find a 333MHz processor, that would improve things.
    >>>>
    >>>>You would need to replace the built-in graphics on the motherboard by installing
    >>>>a PCI graphics card supported by Windows. The built-in graphics probably has a
    >>>>Cirrus Logic chip and 1MB. There are no XP drivers for any Cirrus chips.
    >>>>
    >>>>Max memory is 512MB, consisting of pretty hard to find HP-branded EDO DIMMs, ECC
    >>>>I think. I would recommend the max.
    >>>>
    >>>>The other chipsets on the motherboard are pretty standard and should be
    >>>>supported by XP.
    >>>>
    >>>>Still, I think that the possibility of your client being satisfied with XP Pro
    >>>>running on the LC II is pretty slim. XP Pro is too much of a pig for older and
    >>>>slower computers. Windows 2000 might be a better choice. It is far less
    >>>>bloated... Ben Myers
    >>>>
    >>>>On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 20:16:02 -0700, Bob Felton <bob123.removethis@fieldtown.net>
    >>>>wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>First request posted 7/20/05.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>A client has acquired a used HP NetServer LC II and would like to run
    >>>>>Windows XP Professional on it. Will WinXP Pro run on this machine?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Tnx es 73!
    >>>
    >
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Good description of the newer printers, Ben. Now, if they can add cut
    your toe and finger nails and trim your hair, I would like that.


    On Tue, 02 Aug 2005 12:27:46 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    (Ben Myers) wrote:

    >Good. I am no Linux expert, although I have many years experience in the
    >business. I've done some Linux installs, with older Red Hat and current Suse
    >(courtesy of Novell). Both were extremely easy. Only one reboot needed,
    >compared to the usual Windows reboot-reboot-reboot as different drivers are
    >installed. For a system with older hardware, availability of Linux drivers is a
    >no-brainer, because the Linux distros carry forward the older drivers.
    >Micro$oft is perpetually changing its driver API, rendering old drivers obsolete
    >with newer versions of Windows. File and print servers are easy to set up under
    >Linux. Exceptions might be some of the newer printer-scanner-copier
    >shines-your-shoes kills-warts do-it-all devices, which have very specialized
    >drivers and supporting software under Windows... Ben Myers
    >
    >On Mon, 01 Aug 2005 20:43:21 -0700, Bob Felton <bob123.removethis@fieldtown.net>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Thanks for the info, Ben. I might just look into that for them.
    >>--
    >>Bob
    >>
    >>
    >>On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 22:50:40 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    >>(Ben Myers) wrote:
    >>
    >>>The NetServer LC II would be perfect for saving files for shared access if you
    >>>installed Linux on it. No compatibility problems at all. May even run
    >>>acceptably with as little as 128MB of memory. There are lots of free or nearly
    >>>free and up-to-date versions of Linux available: Red Hat, Mandrake, SUSE (now
    >>>part of Novell), Debian, Ubuntu. Setting up a Linux file server for Windows
    >>>clients is cheap and easy... Ben Myers
    >>>
    >>>On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 13:29:21 -0700, Bob Felton <bob123.removethis@fieldtown.net>
    >>>wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Maybe you hit the wrong key previously, Ben, and your response went
    >>>>into the bit bucket. Anyway, thanks for the informative reply. I
    >>>>will do some soul searching with my client over the matter and see
    >>>>what he wants to do. Client is a small church. They only want to
    >>>>have a "server" to save files to for shared access by other members of
    >>>>the church administration. The NetServer was donated by a church
    >>>>member, but it came without an OS. I think I have a source of a PIII
    >>>>at 500MHz with WinXP that can be donated. That machine should fill
    >>>>the bill OK. Thanks, again, Ben.
    >>>>--
    >>>>Bob
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 03:48:23 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    >>>>(Ben Myers) wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>I thought I responded to the first request, but I must have been imagining.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>The processor at either 266 or 300 MHz is a little slow for running Windows XP
    >>>>>Pro. If you can find a 333MHz processor, that would improve things.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>You would need to replace the built-in graphics on the motherboard by installing
    >>>>>a PCI graphics card supported by Windows. The built-in graphics probably has a
    >>>>>Cirrus Logic chip and 1MB. There are no XP drivers for any Cirrus chips.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Max memory is 512MB, consisting of pretty hard to find HP-branded EDO DIMMs, ECC
    >>>>>I think. I would recommend the max.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>The other chipsets on the motherboard are pretty standard and should be
    >>>>>supported by XP.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Still, I think that the possibility of your client being satisfied with XP Pro
    >>>>>running on the LC II is pretty slim. XP Pro is too much of a pig for older and
    >>>>>slower computers. Windows 2000 might be a better choice. It is far less
    >>>>>bloated... Ben Myers
    >>>>>
    >>>>>On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 20:16:02 -0700, Bob Felton <bob123.removethis@fieldtown.net>
    >>>>>wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>First request posted 7/20/05.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>A client has acquired a used HP NetServer LC II and would like to run
    >>>>>>Windows XP Professional on it. Will WinXP Pro run on this machine?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Tnx es 73!
    >>>>
    >>
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    That's the next release, called Windows Vista. Special Active-X controls for
    different type of manicures and pedicures. The in-grown toenail option may slip
    to the next releae... Ben

    On Tue, 02 Aug 2005 10:06:50 -0700, Bob Felton <bob123.removethis@fieldtown.net>
    wrote:

    >Good description of the newer printers, Ben. Now, if they can add cut
    >your toe and finger nails and trim your hair, I would like that.
    >
    >
    >
    >On Tue, 02 Aug 2005 12:27:46 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    >(Ben Myers) wrote:
    >
    >>Good. I am no Linux expert, although I have many years experience in the
    >>business. I've done some Linux installs, with older Red Hat and current Suse
    >>(courtesy of Novell). Both were extremely easy. Only one reboot needed,
    >>compared to the usual Windows reboot-reboot-reboot as different drivers are
    >>installed. For a system with older hardware, availability of Linux drivers is a
    >>no-brainer, because the Linux distros carry forward the older drivers.
    >>Micro$oft is perpetually changing its driver API, rendering old drivers obsolete
    >>with newer versions of Windows. File and print servers are easy to set up under
    >>Linux. Exceptions might be some of the newer printer-scanner-copier
    >>shines-your-shoes kills-warts do-it-all devices, which have very specialized
    >>drivers and supporting software under Windows... Ben Myers
    >>
    >>On Mon, 01 Aug 2005 20:43:21 -0700, Bob Felton <bob123.removethis@fieldtown.net>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>Thanks for the info, Ben. I might just look into that for them.
    >>>--
    >>>Bob
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 22:50:40 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    >>>(Ben Myers) wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>The NetServer LC II would be perfect for saving files for shared access if you
    >>>>installed Linux on it. No compatibility problems at all. May even run
    >>>>acceptably with as little as 128MB of memory. There are lots of free or nearly
    >>>>free and up-to-date versions of Linux available: Red Hat, Mandrake, SUSE (now
    >>>>part of Novell), Debian, Ubuntu. Setting up a Linux file server for Windows
    >>>>clients is cheap and easy... Ben Myers
    >>>>
    >>>>On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 13:29:21 -0700, Bob Felton <bob123.removethis@fieldtown.net>
    >>>>wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>Maybe you hit the wrong key previously, Ben, and your response went
    >>>>>into the bit bucket. Anyway, thanks for the informative reply. I
    >>>>>will do some soul searching with my client over the matter and see
    >>>>>what he wants to do. Client is a small church. They only want to
    >>>>>have a "server" to save files to for shared access by other members of
    >>>>>the church administration. The NetServer was donated by a church
    >>>>>member, but it came without an OS. I think I have a source of a PIII
    >>>>>at 500MHz with WinXP that can be donated. That machine should fill
    >>>>>the bill OK. Thanks, again, Ben.
    >>>>>--
    >>>>>Bob
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 03:48:23 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    >>>>>(Ben Myers) wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>I thought I responded to the first request, but I must have been imagining.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>The processor at either 266 or 300 MHz is a little slow for running Windows XP
    >>>>>>Pro. If you can find a 333MHz processor, that would improve things.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>You would need to replace the built-in graphics on the motherboard by installing
    >>>>>>a PCI graphics card supported by Windows. The built-in graphics probably has a
    >>>>>>Cirrus Logic chip and 1MB. There are no XP drivers for any Cirrus chips.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Max memory is 512MB, consisting of pretty hard to find HP-branded EDO DIMMs, ECC
    >>>>>>I think. I would recommend the max.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>The other chipsets on the motherboard are pretty standard and should be
    >>>>>>supported by XP.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Still, I think that the possibility of your client being satisfied with XP Pro
    >>>>>>running on the LC II is pretty slim. XP Pro is too much of a pig for older and
    >>>>>>slower computers. Windows 2000 might be a better choice. It is far less
    >>>>>>bloated... Ben Myers
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 20:16:02 -0700, Bob Felton <bob123.removethis@fieldtown.net>
    >>>>>>wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>First request posted 7/20/05.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>A client has acquired a used HP NetServer LC II and would like to run
    >>>>>>>Windows XP Professional on it. Will WinXP Pro run on this machine?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Tnx es 73!
    >>>>>
    >>>
    >
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