168.x.x.x IP address question

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Is there any reason that the default Windows IP when I can't connect to my
router is 168.x.x.x? Is this a perfectly usable Class B IP address set, ie
could I set a router with DHCP to use, say, 168.168.1.x as its addresses to
assign and still have a perfectly usable network?

Thanks,

Ryan
6 answers Last reply
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  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    : Is there any reason that the default Windows IP when I can't connect to my
    : router is 168.x.x.x? Is this a perfectly usable Class B IP address set, ie
    : could I set a router with DHCP to use, say, 168.168.1.x as its addresses to
    : assign and still have a perfectly usable network?

    Hi,

    There is nothing wrong with that IP address, unless you got a public IP from
    the same "class".
    Then you'll not be able to connect to that host, as routing for this class is
    set for you private network.
    So it's better to use class C 192.168.1.0/24 I guess..

    Martin


    --
    Marcin Lukasik
    Milea Wireless Communications, http://milea.pl
    phone/fax/mobile: (++48) 13 4480070 / 13 4481148 / 509 390 490

    ,,the only difference between men and boys is the price of their toys''
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    When a DHCP server does not respond, the DHCP client picks a random ip in
    the 169.254.x.x / mask 255.255.0.0 range.

    You can tell your DHCP server to use any IP addresses and range, I think.
    Except special addresses like 0.0.0.0 and 255.255.255.255 and 224.????????

    What is your real problem?

    Do you have connectivity/ Can you ping the machine/router/modem with the
    dhcp server on, from a dhcp client on it

    Even with DHCP enabled you can still manually override client IP addresses
    and be connected. This presents a problem when the DHCP server then tries to
    assign that IP to a newly connected client

    Unless it's a 'smart' DHCP server...
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "Coenraad Loubser" <c10u@ananzi.co.za> wrote in
    news:cpmq3q$dl4$1@ctb-nnrp2.saix.net:

    > When a DHCP server does not respond, the DHCP client picks a random ip
    > in the 169.254.x.x / mask 255.255.0.0 range.
    >
    > You can tell your DHCP server to use any IP addresses and range, I
    > think. Except special addresses like 0.0.0.0 and 255.255.255.255 and
    > 224.????????
    >
    > What is your real problem?
    >
    > Do you have connectivity/ Can you ping the machine/router/modem with
    > the dhcp server on, from a dhcp client on it
    >
    > Even with DHCP enabled you can still manually override client IP
    > addresses and be connected. This presents a problem when the DHCP
    > server then tries to assign that IP to a newly connected client
    >
    > Unless it's a 'smart' DHCP server...
    >
    >
    >

    Thanks for the reply. I have no problem whatsoever, I was just curious!
    Thanks.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 00:18:38 -0500, in alt.internet.wireless , Jim
    Patterson <jim-patterson@ncf.ca> wrote:

    >If it's actually a 169.254.xxx.yyy number,
    >this is a standard Windows "auto-configuration" range address, which is
    >used if Windows is set for DHCP but can't locate a DHCP server.

    Its NOTHING to do with windows, its what a DHCP client is /supposed/ to do
    it if can't find a server.

    >Apparently, MacOS does the same thing.

    And linux, and unix and openvms and..... :-)


    --
    Mark McIntyre
    CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
    CLC readme: <http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt>
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Mark McIntyre wrote:
    > On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 00:18:38 -0500, in alt.internet.wireless , Jim
    > Patterson <jim-patterson@ncf.ca> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>If it's actually a 169.254.xxx.yyy number,
    >>this is a standard Windows "auto-configuration" range address, which is
    >>used if Windows is set for DHCP but can't locate a DHCP server.
    >
    >
    > Its NOTHING to do with windows, its what a DHCP client is /supposed/ to do
    > it if can't find a server.

    I agree that it's not really Windows-specific, since any OS could
    implement the protocol. I guess I've only encountered it on Windows, not
    being a Mac user. I don't believe that it's what a DHCP client is
    "supposed" to do, though, as it's outside of the DHCP protocol. I don't
    find any mention of it in the DHCP RFC (2131). The Internet draft I
    quoted earlier is basically an add-on to DHCP.

    >>Apparently, MacOS does the same thing.
    >
    > And linux, and unix and openvms and..... :-)

    I've certainly never seen my Linux system do it (Slackware 10), but it
    does seem to be available on other distros. Maybe Slackware's just
    behind the times.

    Personally, I prefer not having it. I can see its utility if I wanted to
    run a workgroup of computers that only communicated with each other, but
    as soon as a gateway to the internet enters the picture, something mroe
    is needed. I've only ever used the 169.254... address as an indication
    that my router is down. Okay... I admit I did use it once to do a
    crossover link between two laptops (it saved me assigning some static IPs).

    --
    Jim Patterson
    Ottawa, Ont
    CANADA
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 21:17:09 -0500, in alt.internet.wireless , Jim
    Patterson <jim-patterson@ncf.ca> wrote:

    >I don't believe that it's what a DHCP client is
    >"supposed" to do, though, as it's outside of the DHCP protocol. I don't
    >find any mention of it in the DHCP RFC (2131). The Internet draft I
    >quoted earlier is basically an add-on to DHCP.

    Its defined by the IETF as the required behaviour if operable routable
    address can be determined. This includes when the host is configured to
    request an address via DHCP and no server responds within the timeout
    period. The block is reserved by IANA for 'linklocal'. I belive this is
    currently covered by
    http://ietfreport.isoc.org/ids/draft-ietf-zeroconf-ipv4-linklocal-17.txt

    >Personally, I prefer not having it. I can see its utility if I wanted to
    >run a workgroup of computers that only communicated with each other,

    There's quite a bit of s/w that won't work if your machine doesn't have a
    valid IP. It sounds obvious, but networking software often won't work, and
    this can stop your machine booting or otherwise starting properly.


    --
    Mark McIntyre
    CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
    CLC readme: <http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt>

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