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Netgear WGR614 Router Configuration

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Anonymous
December 14, 2004 11:36:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I'm having trouble with a Netgear WGR614 router. I installed it
yesterday and it's working fine for connecting to the Internet on a
wired connection and a wireless connection, but I can't connect to
the router to reconfigure the setup. I've performed a factory
setting reset twice, and each time I'm able to configure the router
initially, but when I save the settings and exit it, I am unable to
reconnect to the setup program to make configuration changes.

I didn't (at least not knowingly) change the default I.P. address for
the router.

I've tried to connect to it through I.E. using 192.168.0.1,
www.routerlogin.net/basicsetting.htm, or the Netgear support CD link
that came with the router. Every time, I get an error that the web
page cannot be located.

It's not practical to have to reset the router to the factory
settings every time I want to try a new configuration.

Any ideas?

Mike
Anonymous
December 14, 2004 2:19:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On 14 Dec 2004 08:36:51 -0800, "ToxicMarlin" <msemanso@yahoo.com>
wrote:

>I'm having trouble with a Netgear WGR614 router. I installed it
>yesterday and it's working fine for connecting to the Internet on a
>wired connection and a wireless connection, but I can't connect to
>the router to reconfigure the setup. I've performed a factory
>setting reset twice, and each time I'm able to configure the router
>initially, but when I save the settings and exit it, I am unable to
>reconnect to the setup program to make configuration changes.
>
>I didn't (at least not knowingly) change the default I.P. address for
>the router.
>
>I've tried to connect to it through I.E. using 192.168.0.1,
>www.routerlogin.net/basicsetting.htm, or the Netgear support CD link
>that came with the router. Every time, I get an error that the web
>page cannot be located.
>
>It's not practical to have to reset the router to the factory
>settings every time I want to try a new configuration.

Yes. For initial setup, use:
http://www.routerlogin.net
For everything after that, use:
http://www.routerlogin.com

http://kbserver.netgear.com/support_details.asp?dnldID=...
Note the "known issues" item #1.

Opinion: This is actually a very good idea by Netgear. Too bad they
made the two URL's sufficiently similar that almost everybody
(including me) fails to notice the difference.


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
December 14, 2004 8:04:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

ToxicMarlin <msemanso@yahoo.com> wrote:
> I've tried to connect to it through I.E. using 192.168.0.1,
> www.routerlogin.net/basicsetting.htm, or the Netgear support CD link
> that came with the router. Every time, I get an error that the web
> page cannot be located.

I think the www.routerlogin.net is only available while the router is at
factory defaults. It is handy that it is available as soon as you try to
connect to any web site, but there is a message on screen that it will go
away when configuration is performed.

I presume you are accepting DHCP from the router to your PC.
Have a look at the default gateway and DNS server settings to see what
address is set for the router.
Are you on the "Internet" side of the router, or the "LAN/Wireless" side of
the router?

From Windows CMD prompt, ipconfig /all will show both the default gateway
and the DNS server address, which should be the Netgear.
You should be able to open a web page to that address.

The only other thing I can think of is that you may some firewall or
filtering set on your PC. Have you tried a different PC?
When you successfully connect to the defaulted router, are you specifically
connecting to 192.168.0.1, or are you opening a browser and finding the
config page as the home page?


--
---
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
Related resources
Anonymous
December 14, 2004 11:09:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:

> Yes. For initial setup, use:
> http://www.routerlogin.net
> For everything after that, use:
> http://www.routerlogin.com

> http://kbserver.netgear.com/support_details.asp?dnldID=...
> Note the "known issues" item #1.

> Opinion: This is actually a very good idea by Netgear. Too bad they
> made the two URL's sufficiently similar that almost everybody
> (including me) fails to notice the difference.

I don't read that the same way that you do.
I read that the .net and .com are identical and interchangeable.

I think the initial redirection to this URL from any opening web browser is
a damn fine idea. Using some goofy name that is destined to be an industry
standard is not quite so good.

The original poster indicated that he had also tried 192.168.0.1, which
should have worked. It works for me, with a WGR614v4 Firmware Version
5.0_02. I didn't try the "name", .com or .net.

--
---
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 2:16:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Tue, 14 Dec 2004 20:09:06 +0000 (UTC),
dold@XReXXNetge.usenet.us.com wrote:

>Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
>
>> Yes. For initial setup, use:
>> http://www.routerlogin.net
>> For everything after that, use:
>> http://www.routerlogin.com
>
>> http://kbserver.netgear.com/support_details.asp?dnldID=...
>> Note the "known issues" item #1.

>> Opinion: This is actually a very good idea by Netgear. Too bad they
>> made the two URL's sufficiently similar that almost everybody
>> (including me) fails to notice the difference.
>
>I don't read that the same way that you do.
>I read that the .net and .com are identical and interchangeable.
>
>I think the initial redirection to this URL from any opening web browser is
>a damn fine idea. Using some goofy name that is destined to be an industry
>standard is not quite so good.
>
>The original poster indicated that he had also tried 192.168.0.1, which
>should have worked. It works for me, with a WGR614v4 Firmware Version
>5.0_02. I didn't try the "name", .com or .net.

The setup instructions at:
ftp://downloads.netgear.com/files/wgr614_v2_install_gui...
ftp://downloads.netgear.com/files/wgr614_ref_manual.pdf
both use http://192.168.0.1 instead of the routerlogin.whatever
stuff. I made a guess(tm) from my experience with the MR814, which
uses similar names. One name gets you to the initial setup wizard.
The other goes striaght to the config page. However, this might be a
bad guess(tm). In any case, 192.168.0.1 should work.

You may be right. Just ignore me.


--
# Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
# 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
# jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
# 831.421.6491 digital_pager jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 2:16:30 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Jeff Liebermann wrote:
>
> In any case, 192.168.0.1 should work.
>
It should work on the LAN side, assuming no configuration changes were made
that would prevent it from working. But on the WAN side, in addition to
entering whatever IP address it has, you have to add :8080 for port 8080.
For example, 111.222.333.444:8080. I have two routers, with the WAN port of
the WGR614 connected to a LAN port of my main router, and this allows me to
access the WGR614 from that LAN, which is on a different subnet.

But that raises the question: are two LANs involved? If the WGR614 is set
to automatically received a DHCP address from a router on a first subnet
(e.g., 192.168.0.1), then the WGR614 subnet might automatically be changed
to 192.168.1.1. I haven't tried this myself, since I set a static IP
address, but that is probably how it would work. (So in that case, he would
have to access the WGR614 on 192.168.1.1, or whatever).
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 4:46:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

ToxicMarlin wrote:
> I'm having trouble with a Netgear WGR614 router. I installed it
> yesterday and it's working fine for connecting to the Internet on a
> wired connection and a wireless connection, but I can't connect to
> the router to reconfigure the setup. I've performed a factory
> setting reset twice, and each time I'm able to configure the router
> initially, but when I save the settings and exit it, I am unable to
> reconnect to the setup program to make configuration changes.
>
> I didn't (at least not knowingly) change the default I.P. address for
> the router.
>
> I've tried to connect to it through I.E. using 192.168.0.1,
> www.routerlogin.net/basicsetting.htm, or the Netgear support CD link
> that came with the router. Every time, I get an error that the web
> page cannot be located.
>
> It's not practical to have to reset the router to the factory
> settings every time I want to try a new configuration.
>
> Any ideas?
>
> Mike

What exactly are you "configuring" when you save the changes and then can't
get back to the setup? There are options in there (other than the IP) that
will make the setup inaccessible. For instance, if you only go into the WAN
Setup and change the "Respond to Ping on the Internet Port" checkbox and
save that, can you no longer access the setup?
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 7:04:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Tue, 14 Dec 2004 22:36:34 -0500, "Jim Fox" <NO_foxjh_SPAM@rcn.com>
wrote:

>Jeff Liebermann wrote:
>> In any case, 192.168.0.1 should work.

>It should work on the LAN side, assuming no configuration changes were made
>that would prevent it from working. But on the WAN side, in addition to
>entering whatever IP address it has, you have to add :8080 for port 8080.
>For example, 111.222.333.444:8080. I have two routers, with the WAN port of
>the WGR614 connected to a LAN port of my main router, and this allows me to
>access the WGR614 from that LAN, which is on a different subnet.
>
>But that raises the question: are two LANs involved? If the WGR614 is set
>to automatically received a DHCP address from a router on a first subnet
>(e.g., 192.168.0.1), then the WGR614 subnet might automatically be changed
>to 192.168.1.1. I haven't tried this myself, since I set a static IP
>address, but that is probably how it would work. (So in that case, he would
>have to access the WGR614 on 192.168.1.1, or whatever).

You have all the right buzzwords, but are apparently lacking in how
they are glued together to make a router. Let me try from the
beginning:

A router is a box that is designed to connect two dissimilar networks.
In this case, one network is the greater internet, also known as the
WAN (wide area network). The other network is your own network, known
as the LAN (local area network). Additional networks can also be
connected using static or dynamic routes, but we won't go there.

The basic requirement is that the WAN and LAN networks do not overlap.
Therefore, the LAN side of the router is usually assigned a Class C IP
address block of 255 addresses, such as 192.168.1.xxx. RFC-1918
allegedly insures that nobody on the greater internet uses
192.168.xxx.xxx for their internet connection.

On the WAN side of the router, you have a connection to the internet.
Your favorite ISP assigns you an IP address for the router, and a
gateway through which all packets *NOT* destined for 192.168.1.xxx get
to the ISP and then to the internet. This is called the routeing
table. The routers purpose in life is to connect devices on the LAN
side of the router to the WAN side using rules in this router table.
This is not a great time to explain how to decode a router table.

Connecting to the internet from any device on the LAN is fairly
simplistic. EVERYTHING goes through the ISP's default gateway IP
address and then to the internet. It doesn't matter what IP addresses
(except 192.168.1.xxx) or which IP port numbers 1-65535), they all go
to the internet via the default gateway. Computers and devices are
seperated using NAT (network address translation) and PAT (port
address translation as Cisco calls it) which seperate different
streams using port numbers.

However, coming in from the internet, we have a problem. Your router
has only one WAN IP address. However, there can be as many as 253
computahs on your LAN side. There's no easy way to connect to a
specific computah. For this we have "port redirection" which I don't
wanna burn time on right now.

Coming into the router configuration from the internet, one connects
to the WAN IP address of the router as assigned by the ISP. Coming
into the router configuration from the LAN, one uses the LAN side IP
address (usually 192.168.1.1). Both these addresses are the same
router, just different sides of the router.

From the LAN side, port 80 is usually used. That's not a problem
because the IP address used refers to exactly one device (the router).
However, coming in from the WAN presents a problem. If port
forwarding is enabled and configured, one has to specifically select a
port number that isn't already being used. Port 80 is highly likely
to be used if port forwarding is configured to point to a web server
on the LAN. This is how you run your own web server, by redirecting
the WAN side port 80 to a specific computah on the LAN. So, a
different port is necessary. It can be any port number but for some
odd reason, the cheapo router manufactories limit the choice to 1 or
three port numbers. Usually 8080 is on top of the list, so it gets
selected. Normally WAN side configuration access is disabled to
prevent hackers like me from taking over your router.




--
# Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
# 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
# jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
# 831.421.6491 digital_pager jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 11:51:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Jeff Liebermann wrote:
>> You have all the right buzzwords, but are apparently lacking in how
> they are glued together to make a router. Let me try from the
> beginning:
>
I don't know what you think you added that is of relevance. But if it makes
you happy, OK.
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 12:06:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Wed, 15 Dec 2004 08:51:13 -0500, "Jim Fox" <NO_foxjh_SPAM@rcn.com>
wrote:

>Jeff Liebermann wrote:
>>> You have all the right buzzwords, but are apparently lacking in how
>> they are glued together to make a router. Let me try from the
>> beginning:

>I don't know what you think you added that is of relevance. But if it makes
>you happy, OK.

Sorry. I had a truely rotten day and was snarling at everyone and
everything. My appologies for being excessively offensive.


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 9:36:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Thanks to everyone for their responses. It turns out that the
suggestion to use "ipconfig /all" actually gave me the information
that I was looking for.

I'm not sure how it happened, because I didn't try to change the
router's default IP address, but the default IP address did change
from the documented 192.168.0.1 to 192.168.2.1. Unfortunately, the
link that Netgear provides on their setup CD tries to use the former
address, because it's supposed to be the default.

Only one question remains.

Why did the default IP address change without me explicitly telling it
to (all I was trying to configure was the type of wireless security
that was enabled)? There's only the one router on my local network,
so it's not like there should have been a conflict. In my opinion,
it should never change the default IP address automatically without
telling you that the change is necessary and why it's necessary.
Thanks to all for your input.

Mike
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 11:35:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On 16 Dec 2004 06:36:48 -0800, "ToxicMarlin" <msemanso@yahoo.com>
wrote:

>Why did the default IP address change without me explicitly telling it
>to (all I was trying to configure was the type of wireless security
>that was enabled)?

Can I guess? Perhaps it arrived that way from the dealer? Someone
had it before you, returned it, and it didn't get reset to defaults?
Try resetting the router and starting over.


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 12:28:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

That's all well in good, but if that's the case the documentation is
severly lacking. The only documented way of entering the router's
configuration utility is to use the web address www.routerconfig.net
(or .com, both are listed) or by using the "default" IP address. By
the way, both of these addresses actually worked until the router
finished it's initial configuration. There should be at least one
sure-fire way to enter the configuration utility in my opinion.
Either way, at least I know how to get into it now.
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 1:22:47 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

There was a yellow Quick Start guide that came with the router that
referenced that web address. They also had a copy of the Quick Start
guide in PDF form on the CD that came with the router.

When I tried the 192.168.0.1 IP address, the browser would eventually
return with the "Web page cannot be found" message. I tried the
address a couple of ways. I tried it with the ethernet cable plugged
directly into the cable modem and I tried it while plugged into the
router, but with cable disconnected between the router and the cable
modem. I got the same error message every time.
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 8:16:23 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
>>Why did the default IP address change without me explicitly telling it
>>to (all I was trying to configure was the type of wireless security
>>that was enabled)?

> Can I guess? Perhaps it arrived that way from the dealer? Someone
> had it before you, returned it, and it didn't get reset to defaults?
> Try resetting the router and starting over.

He has done a couple of factory default resets, so he could get back into
it to do his configs.

This router is so smart (?), I wouldn't be surprised if it changes the
default subnet if it detects the existence of the default. I don't think
we know what the internet connection is on the WAN side of the router in
this case.

--
---
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 8:54:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

ToxicMarlin <msemanso@yahoo.com> wrote:
> That's all well in good, but if that's the case the documentation is
> severly lacking. The only documented way of entering the router's
> configuration utility is to use the web address www.routerconfig.net

I didn't see that name listed anywhere, I just happened to see it in the
web browser page during the initial config. Is it in your docs? Not mine.
It is on the firmware update page, but I already had the latest firmware,
so I didn't visit that page until Jeff pointed it out.

I connected my router, opened a cmd window, ran ipconfig to see the default
gateway, and opened a browser to paste in the default gateway address to
start my config, and was quite surprised to see the config window opened up
instead of a failed attempt to open my home page. (I have to clone my MAC
address for my cable modem to allow access to the internet.)

That is a handy feature, and I expected it to go away altogether once the
router was taken away from the default config.


What do you get when you try to connect to 192.168.0.1? Anything?
I wonder if that's a cable modem or dsl modem address that is available to
you. What if you plug your PC directly into the WAN link where you are
connecting the router. Can you get to it then? Do you get an IP address
assigned if you are connected that way? What are you plugging the router
into?

--
---
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 8:54:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Thu, 16 Dec 2004 17:54:39 +0000 (UTC),
dold@XReXXNetge.usenet.us.com wrote:

>That is a handy feature, and I expected it to go away altogether once the
>router was taken away from the default config.

The routerlogin.net stuff appeared only in the last firmware update
for the WGR614. Perhaps the documentation (online and printed) hasn't
caught up to the firmware updates. The release notes show both the
name and the wrong IP:
http://kbserver.netgear.com/support_details.asp?dnldID=...
http://kbserver.netgear.com/products_automatic/wgr614v4...
However, they make no mention of using a different Class C IP block.

This isn't the only router that uses different Class C IP blocks on
initial setup. Some Belkin router I played with came stock with
192.168.2.xxx. I couldn't tell if the "2" was pre-assigned or
randomized. I can see a good reason for doing this on VPN routers,
but not for common wireless. Chances of running into a conflicting
network (not conflicting device) is close to zilch.

Sorry about my reset guess. I didn't catch that it had already been
tried.


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 11:19:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

ToxicMarlin <msemanso@yahoo.com> wrote:
> There was a yellow Quick Start guide that came with the router that
> referenced that web address. They also had a copy of the Quick Start
> guide in PDF form on the CD that came with the router.

I'll have to have a look at the stuff that came with the router.
I bought the WGR814 router and WG511 PC Card at the same time.
The WG511 came with old firmware and drivers that didn't work with
WinXP-SP2, so I downloaded all new stuff for the card. While I was there,
I looked for new stuff for the router. The install guide and reference
manual from the Web both refer to the 192 address, and don't mention the
router name, although firmware page does.

It didn't occur to me that the docs in the box might be newer.
Or do you have the white "v5" router?

Bad:
Netgear has a zillion different products, and then, as if that weren't
enough, the "version" number will roll on an existing product name, giving
you an altogether different, firmware incompatible, revision.


Good:
The WG511 card is more sensitive than my Orinoco. Sitting in my office at
work, I can connect to WAPs that I couldn't even see before.

--
---
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 10:48:56 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

dold@xrexxnetge.usenet.us.com wrote:
> ToxicMarlin <msemanso@yahoo.com> wrote:
>> There was a yellow Quick Start guide that came with the router that
>> referenced that web address. They also had a copy of the Quick Start
>> guide in PDF form on the CD that came with the router.

> I'll have to have a look at the stuff that came with the router.


Even if you change the address, the internal DNS in the NetGear ought to
keep up. That works for me. My Netgear is not at the default address, but
both routerlogin.net and routerlogin.com will pull up the admin page.
Something is doubly odd with the ToxicMarlin's router.

The yellow card that came in the box does point to the routerlogin.net as
the way to configure the router, in addition to the smart wizard
automatically coming up in any browser window if the router has not been
configured.

What is odd is that the yellow card, as well as the install.pdf and and the
FullManual.pdf on the CDROM are newer than what is on the Netgear web site
by six months. Looking at pdf properties:

From the CDROM
May 11 2004 FullManual.pdf
May 11 2004 InstallGuide.pdf

From the website
http://kbserver.netgear.com/products_automatic/wgr614v4...
Dec 10 2003 wgr614v4_install_guide.pdf
Nov 30 2003 wgr614v4_ref_manual.pdf

I submitted a comment on the web pages.

--
---
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
November 13, 2009 3:59:31 AM

hey mike! still checkin this out?

don't connect you netgear router to the net first, just the router and your computer first should be connected to try if your router is still working or not. after you've done that, open an explorer(internet or firefox) whatever you use, then just go to routerlogin.com. dont add any. if it opens,that's it,router still working,if not, better buy a new one. heehee :sol: 
!