How can I know Howmany connections my Wirless Router suppo..

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I have Netgear WLAN Router (connected to Broadband through DSL), how
can I know howmany laptops can be connected simultaneously to the
Router?. How I will know?. I wanted what will be the maximum supported
connections?.

Also I can see "Data Rate/Channels: 2-54Mbps/14 channels". What is
the Channels meaning here?. Is it Maximum of 14 laptops can be
connected simultaneously?.

Thanks in advance.
3 answers Last reply
More about howmany connections wirless router suppo
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    santa19992000@yahoo.com wrote:
    > I have Netgear WLAN Router (connected to Broadband through DSL), how
    > can I know howmany laptops can be connected simultaneously to the
    > Router?. How I will know?. I wanted what will be the maximum supported
    > connections?.
    The maximum supported connections does not really show you a great deal
    since things depend on the type of useage. My AP (DLink) supports 254
    simuntaneous connections, although I would not like any more than 10
    connections at any one time. RTFM or look on the manufacturer's website
    for the actual details.
    >
    > Also I can see "Data Rate/Channels: 2-54Mbps/14 channels". What is
    > the Channels meaning here?. Is it Maximum of 14 laptops can be
    > connected simultaneously?.
    >
    > Thanks in advance.
    >

    No, these are the channels available on the AP. Each channel operates on
    a different frequency within the 2.4GHz - 2.5GHz range. It means that if
    you have 2 or more APs within rage of each other, you can set the
    channel on each so as to minimise interference with each other.

    Hope this Helps

    Peter Phillips
    Kinetiq Networks Ltd (UK)
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    In article <cppn7i$mo3$1@titan.btinternet.com>,
    Peter Phillips <pphillips@_SPAMTRAP_kinetiqnetworks.com> wrote:
    >santa19992000@yahoo.com wrote:
    >> I have Netgear WLAN Router (connected to Broadband through DSL), how
    >> can I know howmany laptops can be connected simultaneously to the
    >> Router?. How I will know?. I wanted what will be the maximum supported
    >> connections?.
    >The maximum supported connections does not really show you a great deal
    >since things depend on the type of useage. My AP (DLink) supports 254
    >simuntaneous connections, although I would not like any more than 10
    >connections at any one time. RTFM or look on the manufacturer's website
    >for the actual details.
    >>
    >> Also I can see "Data Rate/Channels: 2-54Mbps/14 channels". What is
    >> the Channels meaning here?. Is it Maximum of 14 laptops can be
    >> connected simultaneously?.
    >>
    >> Thanks in advance.
    >>
    >
    >No, these are the channels available on the AP. Each channel operates on
    >a different frequency within the 2.4GHz - 2.5GHz range. It means that if
    >you have 2 or more APs within rage of each other, you can set the
    >channel on each so as to minimise interference with each other.
    >
    >Hope this Helps
    >
    >Peter Phillips
    >Kinetiq Networks Ltd (UK)

    FWIW, ask Netgear how many they commit to.

    A discussion in the Cisco usenet group mentioned that the cheap retail
    APs/dsl routers can have problems when installed in any situation
    other than those like the diagrams shown the manufacturer's literature
    and any use in a more complex network could trip up undocumented
    shortcommings in the software.

    Mentioned was the MAC address table being limited to as few as 16
    machines, and if said device is hooked up to a business LAN segment
    with more desktop machines than the AP's MAC could handle their would
    be problems. The details are very model-specific.

    I have a problem using cheapo equipment in business situations. For
    one thing, the manufacturer can change the guts of the box without
    changing the model #, and I have private conversations that tell me
    that the way one large WiFi manufacturer obtains it's imbedded
    software is very strange. This makes sparing a problem.

    In a low-budget business app, I say use try it. If it works, buy a
    second box and make sure it's identical hardware and software and put
    it on the shelf as a spare (after testing it.) Prepare the buyer that
    if he adds anything that complicates the network topology to be
    prepared to have some head scratching.

    As for WiFI APs. I like the Cisco models for about $400US. More
    powerful radio, PoE, nice cosmetics in an office environment, better
    documentation, and lots of support available for questions like this.

    As to the OP's specific question, I'd be upset if it don't work
    reliably with at least 15 machins, wifi and copper , in any
    combination. Above 16 machines you should have enough budget
    that a better broadband router and AP should be affordable.

    Consider the business outage issues if the internet connection
    is broken or, worse, flakey.

    (I'm not saying that the OP is looking to use it in a business ap. I'm
    just ranting.)
    --
    a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
    ----
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    In article <1103122718.816765.306610@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
    <santa19992000@yahoo.com> wrote:
    :I have Netgear WLAN Router (connected to Broadband through DSL), how
    :can I know howmany laptops can be connected simultaneously to the
    :Router?. How I will know?. I wanted what will be the maximum supported
    :connections?.

    :Also I can see "Data Rate/Channels: 2-54Mbps/14 channels". What is
    :the Channels meaning here?. Is it Maximum of 14 laptops can be
    :connected simultaneously?.

    I answered this for you already in comp.dcom.lans.ethernet.
    I explained what the channels meant in terms of frequency.
    I also pointed you to Netgear's documentation on the WG614
    that indicated a limit of 253 systems. But then, as now, I had
    to guess about which model you had: even though I pointed out
    before that you failed to tell us the model, you reposted the
    question as-is without telling us the model! :( :(

    I know you read the answers, because it was one of the replies
    to my reply that mentioned alt.internet.wireless .

    --
    I was very young in those days, but I was also rather dim.
    -- Christopher Priest
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