Recommended security setting

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I have my Linksys WAG54G set up and working very well, now. This
is a home network system that is connected to a DSL service. Thus
far I have left the Wireless Security Mode set for Disabled. I am
really not very apprehensive, since we live in a rather quite
locality and thus far I have not detected any other wireless
activity within range of my WAG54G. However, I do realize that
someone could drive down our street and find our signal, then do
some snooping. I don't have any critical files set up to be
shared, but I would still prefer that no intrusions were likely
to happen. What are the best security settings in a case like
mine?

Should I limit the number of stations that can access this
network? If so, how can I do this such that my laptop's slot
won't be available when the laptop is not turned on and logged
onto the network?
5 answers Last reply
More about recommended security setting
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Mon, 20 Dec 2004 01:00:49 GMT, Gordon <gordonlr@DELETEswbell.net>
    wrote:

    >I have my Linksys WAG54G set up and working very well, now. This
    >is a home network system that is connected to a DSL service. Thus
    >far I have left the Wireless Security Mode set for Disabled. I am
    >really not very apprehensive, since we live in a rather quite
    >locality and thus far I have not detected any other wireless
    >activity within range of my WAG54G. However, I do realize that
    >someone could drive down our street and find our signal, then do
    >some snooping. I don't have any critical files set up to be
    >shared, but I would still prefer that no intrusions were likely
    >to happen. What are the best security settings in a case like
    >mine?
    >
    >Should I limit the number of stations that can access this
    >network? If so, how can I do this such that my laptop's slot
    >won't be available when the laptop is not turned on and logged
    >onto the network?
    In my opinion, you should make every attempt to secure your wireless
    network. Even if you live in a quiet and remote area, your wireless
    signal, under the perfect circumstances, may travel far beyond your
    area. At the moment, you may not have any critical files on your pc,
    however, if you create and receive email, then you have critical
    information available to a would-be hacker and besides, you may
    inadvertently give out the names of all your email buddies as well as
    their email address. This could be a spammer's dream. Anyway, if you
    have WEP, WPA (radius) or WPA-PSK available to you, pick one and use
    it. It is preferred that you use WPA or WPA-PSK encryption. This
    will at least secure the traffic sent from your wireless device to the
    AP and vice-versa. MAC address filtering should also be available.
    It's not foolproof, but it is another layer of defense. I hope this
    information helps you. Take care.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Mon, 20 Dec 2004 21:23:00 GMT, Doug Jamal
    <bishiv6AT@yahooDOT.com> wrote:

    >On Mon, 20 Dec 2004 01:00:49 GMT, Gordon <gordonlr@DELETEswbell.net>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>I have my Linksys WAG54G set up and working very well, now. This
    >>is a home network system that is connected to a DSL service. Thus
    >>far I have left the Wireless Security Mode set for Disabled. I am
    >>really not very apprehensive, since we live in a rather quite
    >>locality and thus far I have not detected any other wireless
    >>activity within range of my WAG54G. However, I do realize that
    >>someone could drive down our street and find our signal, then do
    >>some snooping. I don't have any critical files set up to be
    >>shared, but I would still prefer that no intrusions were likely
    >>to happen. What are the best security settings in a case like
    >>mine?
    >>
    >>Should I limit the number of stations that can access this
    >>network? If so, how can I do this such that my laptop's slot
    >>won't be available when the laptop is not turned on and logged
    >>onto the network?
    >In my opinion, you should make every attempt to secure your wireless
    >network. Even if you live in a quiet and remote area, your wireless
    >signal, under the perfect circumstances, may travel far beyond your
    >area. At the moment, you may not have any critical files on your pc,
    >however, if you create and receive email, then you have critical
    >information available to a would-be hacker and besides, you may
    >inadvertently give out the names of all your email buddies as well as
    >their email address. This could be a spammer's dream. Anyway, if you
    >have WEP, WPA (radius) or WPA-PSK available to you, pick one and use
    >it. It is preferred that you use WPA or WPA-PSK encryption. This
    >will at least secure the traffic sent from your wireless device to the
    >AP and vice-versa. MAC address filtering should also be available.
    >It's not foolproof, but it is another layer of defense. I hope this
    >information helps you. Take care.
    >
    Thanks, Doug, this is the information I was looking for. My
    WAG54G setup has WPA Pre-Shared Key, WPA RADIUS, RADIUS and WEP.

    I assume a choice has to be made, then carefully set each
    computer to the same Wireless Security Mode. I tried this, but
    kept getting a total failure of the network. I guess I need to go
    back through the manual and re-read the setup instructions.

    I think part of my problem may stem from the fact that Microsoft
    automatically makes some settings on two of the computers, but
    for some reason does not have any control on my desktop system.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    This is what I just finished doing today on my Linksys Wireless B Router
    (BEFW11S4) using a DSL internet connection:

    1. Change the default router password (my default was 'admin') to your own
    personal one.
    2. Enable WEP (128 bit).
    3. Use MAC filtering.
    4. Change the default channel (usually 6) to something else....pick one! I
    switched to Channel 3.
    5. Change the default SSID (mine was 'linksys') to like 'GordNetwork' or
    something like that.

    The product support pages at http://www.linksys.com guide you on how to do
    these 5 things.

    Regards,

    Kevin


    "Gordon" <gordonlr@DELETEswbell.net> wrote in message
    news:9n8cs0lknoboee1e1rn1tia895r7ec2gfr@4ax.com...
    >I have my Linksys WAG54G set up and working very well, now. This
    > is a home network system that is connected to a DSL service. Thus
    > far I have left the Wireless Security Mode set for Disabled. I am
    > really not very apprehensive, since we live in a rather quite
    > locality and thus far I have not detected any other wireless
    > activity within range of my WAG54G. However, I do realize that
    > someone could drive down our street and find our signal, then do
    > some snooping. I don't have any critical files set up to be
    > shared, but I would still prefer that no intrusions were likely
    > to happen. What are the best security settings in a case like
    > mine?
    >
    > Should I limit the number of stations that can access this
    > network? If so, how can I do this such that my laptop's slot
    > won't be available when the laptop is not turned on and logged
    > onto the network?
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Tue, 21 Dec 2004 00:47:13 GMT, Gordon <gordonlr@DELETEswbell.net>
    wrote:

    >On Mon, 20 Dec 2004 21:23:00 GMT, Doug Jamal
    ><bishiv6AT@yahooDOT.com> wrote:
    >
    >>On Mon, 20 Dec 2004 01:00:49 GMT, Gordon <gordonlr@DELETEswbell.net>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>I have my Linksys WAG54G set up and working very well, now. This
    >>>is a home network system that is connected to a DSL service. Thus
    >>>far I have left the Wireless Security Mode set for Disabled. I am
    >>>really not very apprehensive, since we live in a rather quite
    >>>locality and thus far I have not detected any other wireless
    >>>activity within range of my WAG54G. However, I do realize that
    >>>someone could drive down our street and find our signal, then do
    >>>some snooping. I don't have any critical files set up to be
    >>>shared, but I would still prefer that no intrusions were likely
    >>>to happen. What are the best security settings in a case like
    >>>mine?
    >>>
    >>>Should I limit the number of stations that can access this
    >>>network? If so, how can I do this such that my laptop's slot
    >>>won't be available when the laptop is not turned on and logged
    >>>onto the network?
    >>In my opinion, you should make every attempt to secure your wireless
    >>network. Even if you live in a quiet and remote area, your wireless
    >>signal, under the perfect circumstances, may travel far beyond your
    >>area. At the moment, you may not have any critical files on your pc,
    >>however, if you create and receive email, then you have critical
    >>information available to a would-be hacker and besides, you may
    >>inadvertently give out the names of all your email buddies as well as
    >>their email address. This could be a spammer's dream. Anyway, if you
    >>have WEP, WPA (radius) or WPA-PSK available to you, pick one and use
    >>it. It is preferred that you use WPA or WPA-PSK encryption. This
    >>will at least secure the traffic sent from your wireless device to the
    >>AP and vice-versa. MAC address filtering should also be available.
    >>It's not foolproof, but it is another layer of defense. I hope this
    >>information helps you. Take care.
    >>
    >Thanks, Doug, this is the information I was looking for. My
    >WAG54G setup has WPA Pre-Shared Key, WPA RADIUS, RADIUS and WEP.
    >
    >I assume a choice has to be made, then carefully set each
    >computer to the same Wireless Security Mode. I tried this, but
    >kept getting a total failure of the network. I guess I need to go
    >back through the manual and re-read the setup instructions.
    >
    >I think part of my problem may stem from the fact that Microsoft
    >automatically makes some settings on two of the computers, but
    >for some reason does not have any control on my desktop system.
    >
    Hi Gordon. What OS are you using? Unless otherwise stated, I will
    assume it is windows xp. If I am correct, I suggest that you update
    xp to SP-2
    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=049c9dbe-3b8e-4f30-8245-9e368d3cdb5a&DisplayLang=en
    and then install the update to SP-2
    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=36dd19df-bc5e-44b7-a339-6794d97994a2&DisplayLang=en

    The SP-2 update makes wireless networking with WPA and WPA-PSK
    encryption, using the windows wireless zero configuration utility, a
    breeze. Anyway, go to your router's configuration menu and locate the
    security settings. If you do not have a radius server to communicate
    with, then choose the WPA-PSK. The wording may be different. For
    instance, some router indicate WPA (radius) and WPA (non-radius).
    After selecting WPA-PSK, you might see TKIP and/or AES. These are
    ciphers. If you see AES, choose it because it is the most secure at
    this time. If not, TKIP will definitely suffice. Now create a long
    nonsense passphrase and type it where indicated.. For example:

    bQ2hrTqo CjyOTYRUegSdKEl9QVmeKhZm4Ma0B2jwaGIRq1goarKxNPxjpmeru7.

    Copy the passphrase because when you finish, you will have to enter it
    into your card's configuration menu or the windows zero configuration
    menu under WPA-PSK. Click apply or okay then exit the utility. Now
    pull up the card's utility or the windows wireless zero configuration
    utility. Basically, do the same as above. By the way, update the
    firmware of the card and router, if available prior to starting this
    procedure. Let me know how it turn out. Take care.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Tue, 21 Dec 2004 15:16:17 -0500, "Kevin Long"
    <supermax120@hotmail.com.NOSPAM> wrote:
    >2. Enable WEP (128 bit).

    All good advice, but, if possible, use Wi-Fi Protected Access with a
    pre-shared key (WPA-PSK) instead of WEP. Check out this article on
    the latest WEP cracking tools for more information:

    http://securityfocus.com/infocus/1814

    I just added a wireless network to my home network last night as well,
    and while my DI-524 wireless router and Windows XP SP2 on the laptop
    support WPA-PSK, the GemTek WL-350 mini PCI WLAN adapter *in* the
    laptop does not. So I'm using WEP too. Add to that that version 1.05
    of the firmware on the DI-524 has mucked up MAC filtering (drops all
    wireless connections once it's turned on, no matter the MACs in the
    list), and I'm feeling a little exposed.
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